Today's Opinions

  • Good customer service is business no-brainer

    Mistakes happen, but good customer service is one way to set a business apart.
    Owners need to build and maintain a stellar perception of their companies so that conversation about it is always positive.
    This is especially important for startup companies, which are more likely to experience stiff competition from entrenched organizations already in the marketplace.
    A savvy owner of a startup business will do research to make sure there is a market for any product before launching it; what customers want from it; and how to price it.

  • Semiautomatic up for state firearm

    New Mexico has 20 official state symbols and may have a 21st before this legislative session is over.
    Senate Bill 109, introduced by Sen. George Munoz of Gallup designates the squash blossom necklace as New Mexico’s official state necklace.
    Before you get upset about lawmakers wasting time with such trivia, let me say that bills such as this consume very little time and effort of legislators. They are indicative of a state’s culture and provide help in advertising.

  • If it ain’t broke people

    If my tax dollars paid for someone to come up with the lame brained idea of reducing Trinity Drive to two lanes, I want my money back.
    I have lived in Los Alamos for almost 31 one years. I’ve driven Trinity Drive tens of thousands of times at all times of day and night. I’ve never had a problem.
    Sure, traffic slows and all lanes are used at peak times but it’s to be expected and isn’t a problem (except for the “Type A”s that think they have to be in such a hurry).

  • Lack of sidewalks on Trinity is concerning

    In regard to the NM502/Trinity Corridor, citizens who live on Arroyo Lane/Verde Ridge would like to address issues/concerns regarding the lack of sidewalks and the ability to cross Trinity Drive/East Gate Road with out going a half mile, or more, to get to a crosswalk safely in order to go to the grocery store or Atomic City Transit stops.

  • Keeping secrets while raising working funds

    Entrepreneurs with an idea for a product or startup company are often concerned about revealing information until they are far enough along that others can’t copy them. The concern is reasonable; the economy is globally competitive and entrepreneurs are looking to protect any edge they have.

  • Madness of mental illness

    My friend’s life was dominated by her mentally ill son.
    He was schizophrenic and had dangerous delusions. He would be committed to the New Mexico State Hospital in Las Vegas for six months at a time, but could not be kept longer than that due to laws intended to safeguard the freedoms of the mentally ill.
    She worried about him in the hospital because of the living conditions, but she worried about him much more when he was free.

  • The downside of a good fortune

    The rates of China’s economic growth are often reported in a wide variety of sectors. But China is experiencing another bonanza, too. It doesn’t get the headlines commanded by economic figures, but it catches the attention of geologists and anyone with an interest in the history of life on Earth.
    What’s at issue is the absolute tsunami of fossil specimens that are dug up in China and make their way around the world.

  • Faster for less money

    We are a nation of laws. By nature most of us resent laws that restrict what we do. At the same time, I hear no one singing the praises of lawlessness.
    The burning interest in laws misses a third option that is freer of pitfalls than either rules or lawlessness. The creative path has gained some notable ground on pollution problems.  
    The approach can be described as “voluntary,” “pursuing ideas” or “jawboning,” if you would call it that. They all mean achieving better pollution control than the law demands.