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Today's Opinions

  • Sweet and sour science

    I remember the first time I had sweet and sour pork.  It was New York City and the meat was soaked in that sugary vinegar sauce, guaranteed to hide the flavor of pretty much anything you wanted to cook.  
    My friends and I were delighted with an endless variety of food names we had never seen before; Moo shu, bean curd, chicken cooked by some military dude named Tso, and of course the sweet and sour.  It was all very delicious, but I’m not really sure what the meats were.

  • Civility still greases the wheels

    Here’s a word legislative Democrats and Republicans use for each other quite often, one you won’t see often in the press: collegial.
    You might think a legislative session is only one step above Jello wrestling, but you’d be wrong. The language is civil, even courtly: “Gentle lady from Chavez… Gentleman from Cibola…”

  • Cancer survivor lives life

    I’ve tried to be normal for more than two years now and I just can’t do it. To you, I may look normal, sound normal, smile when I should and argue when I shouldn’t, but behind the facade is a person who’s acting out a role.
    Why? Because cancer changes your life. Normal went out the window.
    If you’ve ever been in an oncology clinic, you probably have seen that poem, taped to the wall, about what cancer cannot do: “It cannot rob you of your smile, it cannot steal your hope …,” and it’s very true.

  • Time to pull that trigger

    There have been so many “defining moments” in our nation’s history – every election today, for example, is proclaimed such – the term is more cliche than truth.
    Our war for independence was obviously a defining moment – not solely for our country, but for the world, as it turned out. The Civil War – the election of Lincoln and the anti-slavery voice countering the growing power of the South.
    Two world wars. The civil rights movement. We send a man to the moon. Those were genuinely defining moments.

  • State budget ripples through economies and communities

    We complain that they aren’t competent. But now we have reason to worry that there aren’t enough of them.
    Government employees, that is ­— specifically, the front-line regulators who are charged with keeping us safe and keeping our institutions honest. This is an effect of the looming cuts in the state budget.

  • Co-op market earns kudos

    I would like to express my thanks to the audacious individuals who have made it possible to buy bulk food, unique organic produce, and local meat in town any day or night of the week! You deserve to be applauded for having the guts, will and foresight to bring this modern, healthy alternative here.
    I sincerely hope we embrace new community opportunities like this and in the future ask ourselves why it took so long to do so.

  • Research altered votes

    John Pawlak has gone over the edge. Without participating in the process, he has called the volunteers who make up the transportation board stupid.
    I throw his statement back at him; stupid is as stupid does.
    When I was on the Transportation Board, we started 7-0 against roundabouts. After studying the engineering, reviewing simulations, reviewing the experience of other communities, reviewing the safety statistics and meeting with representatives of the community, we changed our minds, and voted 6-1 in favor of roundabouts.

  • Trinity needs taming

    There is no doubt about it: Trinity Drive is a most unattractive and dangerous major thoroughfare. It is an intimidating barrier for pedestrians to cross and a racecourse for bicyclists to avoid. I, too, would like to see it tamed and made more inviting.