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Today's Opinions

  • Earth's fragile surface

    My friend Sharon Rogers lives in suburban Virginia.
    On Tuesday she and her husband were leaving their house to go to a late lunch when she felt something like thunder sweeping over the neighborhood.
    “I thought it was a military jet going over too low,” she told me on the telephone. “I said to myself, ‘It’s another damn general being buried in Arlington.’”
     It was no jet, but a Richter 5.9 earthquake that struck near Mineral, VA.
    Why, you may ask, should there have been an earthquake in what is supposed to be the seismically placid East Coast?
    Allow me to answer by way of an analogy.

  • Find your voice

    I would like to recount for you my most recent medical circumstances that prompted me to write this letter, so here goes ... I started feeling like I was coming down with something on Sunday, Aug. 7 … nothing dramatic, just tired, and headachy. I came to work on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday still felling a little puny.
    Wednesday just before 5 p.m. I really started to feel bad, added to my already feeling of puny, I developed a severe pain going from my chest to my back — straight through.
    Thursday morning I awoke to pain from the top of my head to soles of my feet. I decided to take my temperature and it registered 101.7.

  • Tourism secretary had a plan

    In July as the state’s forests, along with its tourism season, seemed to be going up in smoke, the industry anxiously awaited a move from Santa Fe to counter bad publicity.
    They wondered aloud if Tourism Secretary Monique Jacobson had a game plan.
    She did. Rather than calling more attention to the fires, she took another approach – the “Catch the Kid” campaign.
    Don’t expect the same old thing from Jacobson, a home-grown marketer hired away from Quaker Oats to breathe life into tourism promotion. She grew up in the business – her father’s a hotelier in Taos Ski Valley – and honed her skills out of state. Now she’s back with energy, ideas and infectious enthusiasm.

  • Texas continues to bully New Mexico

    Texas has done it to us again. The state has enjoyed bullying us ever since it came into existence. This time it involves playing by different rules for the collection on drought insurance.
    Last year, as the effects of drought became very obvious, the U.S. Department of Agriculture began touting a new drought insurance policy. Ranchers in New Mexico and Texas jumped at the opportunity.
    Sure enough, both states are experiencing the worst droughts in recorded history. Texas ranchers have received $65 million in payments. New Mexico ranchers have received $2,000 for the $1.5 million they paid in premiums.

  • Put safety above all else

    Recently I read in the Los Alamos Monitor where the county is spending even more money than it already has on the issue of studying the “need” of narrowing Trinity Drive and adding roundabouts.  
    Recently, I also read in the Los Alamos Monitor an article about human stupidity by John Pawlak. In the past 11 years, Los Alamos has had to evacuate twice because of forest fires. The  fire of 2000 started because of lack of logic/common sense. What happens if another disaster should hit Los Alamos and the need for evacuation.  Right now Trinity Drive is the only town street that has four lanes leading directly out of Los Alamos.  

  • Abandon the plan to tear up Trinity Drive

    Roundabouts or not, the tearing up and rebuilding of Trinity Drive for a multi-year project will destroy those few small businesses, which still exist downtown, because the lab traffic will migrate to the truck route and Pajarito Road, bypassing the downtown business district altogether.   
    Choking Trinity to two lanes to make room for a bicycle lane may be politically correct, but it will be the economic death for the struggling Los Alamos retail community. We’ve already lost one of our favorite local stores, Cook’n in Style, and several other small businesses are on the ropes.

  • Stop sensationalizing family tragedy

    Freedom of the press is very important. Freedom of the press used to sensationalize a family tragedy to sell papers cannot be prevented, but I strongly object.
    The front-page headline and story in Wednesday’s Los Alamos Monitor compels me to object for these good people, friends, whose families have been in Los Alamos for generations, object in compassion for the mentally ill, object over endless rehashing of the story.
    Others feel the same, as well they should. Enough already.  

    Sue King
    Los Alamos

     

  • Some colorful governors

    Who were New Mexico’s most off-beat governors?  My choices are Dave Cargo, Gary Johnson and Clyde Tingley.
    It isn’t difficult for most New Mexicans to remember Gary Johnson. He was governor back just the other side of Bill Richardson.  It often seemed as though Johnson was more interested in his athletic feats than in being governor.
    But Johnson did attend to business, keeping New Mexico’s budget under firm control while pushing his libertarian views of restraining government from interfering in people’s business or private lives.