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Today's Opinions

  • Letters 11-03-11

    As you roll your 48-gallon trash roll cart down the driveway to deposit it at the curb, do you ever wonder why you are being charged the same fee per month as your neighbor who has a 96-gallon cart overflowing with trash?  
    There is another option, and it is known as a Pay-as-you-throw (PAYT) solid waste rate structure.  
    With a PAYT rate system residents are charged for trash services based on how much waste they put out every week for disposal.  
    By charging for trash services based on roll cart size, a more equitable rate structure is created.  Also, residents are given a financial incentive to reduce trash.  

  • Crisis in rural America

    The U.S. Postal Service study on closing some 3,700 post offices in the nation poses a real crisis for rural America.
    The problem is an $8 billion budget deficit. New Mexico has 54 of those target post offices. Hearings currently are being held to determine which offices should be cut.
    Rural post offices are more than just a place to pick up mail. They are locations to congregate and see your neighbors at the appointed time when the mail truck is scheduled to arrive.
    Driving to the nearest open post office can take hours and be impossible in the winter.
    The only thing worse is losing a school house. School closings began in New Mexico in the late 1940s.

  • Sitting on our historical assets

    In Texas for work and play, we see the scorched mesquite remaining from their wildfires.
    Hundreds of miles of dead trees guarantee more fires to come. But the icy fingers of the recession haven’t chilled Texas as they have New Mexico.
    As usual, I can’t resist studying how Texas does things – in this case, tourism.
    I’m here to see Fort Griffin, or what’s left of it, perched above the Clear Fork of the Brazos.
    The grounds are spacious and even include a small herd of Texas longhorns.
    “They’re just big puppy dogs,” says the visitor center staffer, who assures us we can just walk around them.
    Every fort has a story to tell, but they’re not just a history lesson.

  • Expert advocates new pool

    The leisure pool addition to the Aquatic Center is a true multi-generational facility.
    As a Red Cross Water Safety instructor/trainer for 25 years in Los Alamos, I have some considerable experience in the teaching of basic swimming techniques through life saving, to the very young as well as the senior citizenry.  
    Too many times have I heard “it is too cold — I am going to leave.”  
    All ages will have the warm temperature to water-walk or swim and take a swim class with relaxed, pliant muscles in water temperature conducive to learning.  
    Therefore I am asking that all residents to seriously consider this election and vote YES for this leisure pool addition.

    Rosemary O’Connor

  • Bad timing for a pool

    Why would the county want to bring forth a bond issue, especially a property tax (general obligation) bond in the middle of a recession? Property taxes are a real burden since they never go down but always up.
    As a landlord, I have seen the taxes go up in the face of falling property values. Once upon a time, capital gains were a source of retirement income but now they are no longer a prime source.
    The prospect of federal increases in capital gains really socks it to the landlords and increases rent. Any new tax now is a negative influence on the economy — the leisure pool can wait.

    Vernon Kerr
    White Rock

     

  • Lujan's silence sparks voter remorse

    As an independent conservative, I voted for Ben Ray Lujan because I thought he represented the greatest chance that something would actually be done in Washington. It is hard for me to admit it, but I was wrong.
    If we as a species ever hope to  become civilized, we must learn to solve all of our problems without the use of force. For every problem we face, from the smallest family to the largest government, we must learn to talk openly about the problem with those with whom we disagree, find a reasonable solution where all win, make an agreement, and then keep our word.  I would suggest that when we won’t even talk to each other, there is no further chance to become civilized.

  • ISO: A bridge to modern self regulation

     Rainfall is like regulation. Too little or too much of either is bad news for the economy.
    The flood of bad news these days begs for new paths to take.
    One prospect is self-regulation with a modern twist. The task is for an industry to regulate itself and self-enforce effective rules on all of its members. Experience says the task fights against human nature.
    More human nature says that camps fight against anything from outside their camp that restricts how things are done.
    Human nature will never change, so how can regulation be made effective and efficient?
    One way is by changes that make different use of human nature. How might industry really self-enforce its own regulations and why might it work for a large problem?

  • Live up to your ideals

    Dear Occupy Los Alamos Skate Park Movement, PLEASE CLEAN UP AFTER YOURSELVES!
    My family just spent an hour removing 20 gallons of trash from the skate park parking lot.
    While I appreciate the opportunity you afforded me to demonstrate true concern for the environment, please live up to the ideals your movement expounds.

    James J. Kuropatwinski (and Family)
    Los Alamos