Today's Opinions

  • Book demand is only partially predictable

    Inventory management is always the trickiest challenge for any business. You want to have enough of an item on hand to meet the demand, but you don’t want to have more on hand that is needed to meet the demand.  The problem is that demand is only partially predictable; you can, after some time, get a good sense of average demand and seasonal demand, but there will be times when there are unusual spikes and there you are with a customer wanting something you normally carry but you are out of stock. The only solution is to order the extra required to fill the spike.

  • This town needs a strong mayor

    So, the Charter Review Committee has deemed that the county and a strong mayor type government are not a good fit. We are after all a city/county government. What is wrong with having a strong mayor where there is a true separation of powers?
    What is wrong with having a mayor who makes decisions without having to pass everything before a seven-person council?
    If, as the Charter Review Committee deems, we might have a weak mayor, which would appear to look like a council with eight members.

  • This ain't no scam sister

    Consultants to the Public Education Department have been in the news the past few weeks.
    Use of the consultants has been called everything from a waste of money to insulting to a scam, the latter epithet coming from an Albuquerque Journal columnist.
    Before addressing the charges, consider public education in New Mexico. In general, we spend more money and get less than nearly every state.
    According to the National Education Association, during 2009 we spent $10,999 for each student in our public K-12 schools.

  • Much of corridor broken

    I would like to provide some corrections and clarifications to comments that are being made by opponents of the proposed changes to NM502/Trinity Drive, as it seems to me that the opponents have not followed the public information sessions nor are they providing correct commentary on many aspects of the design or reasons for change.

  • Accessing federal funds

    The next-best thing to free money is available through two federal programs for small businesses involved in technology and innovation.
    The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program – the larger of the two – grants money to small and startup businesses to develop products, technology or services that solve pressing problems in agriculture, defense, education, energy, transportation, the environment, space exploration, health and other areas.

  • Pull plug on water bill, appoint state engineer

    Water hasn’t gotten much legislative attention this year. Maybe that’s why one bill with far reaching consequences has passed its first committee.
    HB 109 would allow water permit applicants who disagree with the state engineer’s initial decisions to appeal directly to district court. In other words, a dissatisfied applicant could bypass practice and precedent and see if the courts would hand down a more favorable decision.

  • PRC needs to get a grip

    At the height of the bitter cold that left tens of thousands of New Mexicans without heat in their homes and workplaces last month, the Village of Taos sent out a plaintive news release updating the gravity of the situation.
    “With temperatures again dropping, and communications from Taos’ community constituents becoming ever more urgent,” the release said, “Taosons are advised to take care of themselves…”
    Translated: Folks, you’re on your own.

  • Knowing which type of insurance is best

    When it comes to insurance, many people face the Goldilocks dilemma: Am I buying too much coverage, not enough, or just the right amount?
    How do you determine your proper insurance levels while ensuring you don’t waste money on unneeded coverage – or worse, leave your family exposed?