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Today's Opinions

  • Population is a long, long line

                                                             

    Picture every part of the environment having a string tied to it. The strings lead to concerns spaced in time and distance.

    At one end the strings all meet in a tangle of knots.

    That mighty tangle is world population.

  • Life can be very taxng

    It would be very entertaining to resurrect the Founding Fathers – the guys who fought to build a nation that would not suffer taxation without representation – and see the expressions on their faces when they see what that ideology has spawned.  Taxation “with” representation is our credo and we certainly do have representation.  Boy, do we have representation!  

     

    More so than most people realize.

     

  • Conserve now, renewables for the long term

     The authors of the “Think twice ….” op-ed (Monitor, July 16, 2009) were correct in stating that at the current human consumption rate today’s scale of renewable energy production is devastatingly bleak.

    Sharon Begley (Newsweek, March 23) summarized the outlook in scientific and engineering terms: “We cannot get there from here.”

  • Women: Are we there yet?

     Each year, on Aug. 26, we celebrate Women’s Equality Day to pay tribute to those brave suffragists, like Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Alice Paul and Ida B. Wells Barnett, who led the struggle for American women to win the most critical tool of democracy ­­- the right to vote.

    Women today not only have the right to vote, but we’ve made significant advances in the world of work, in education, in business and in many other arenas.

    Still, Women’s Equality Day 2009 offers the chance for a temperature check.

  • A thousand thanks

    The credit roll for a typical feature film is several hundred names long.

    Even a television documentary is often at least a hundred people or organizations. In fact the collaborative efforts and acts of generosity and kindness for a typical educational or cultural video can be so long that the credit roll, in order not to take up half the show, has to be accelerated to the point that thanks and credits whiz by in an unreadable blur.

    There is almost never a power point at the national laboratory that doesn’t include a dozen names and sponsors.

  • Definitely opposed to retail development at Trinity Site

    Why do we need the Trinity Project? Does the county need it or want it, or does the school board need money?

    If the schools need money, there are most likely better ways to obtain it than at the expense of the future of Los Alamos’ downtown.

    If the council wants it, you would have to do a lot of explaining to the voters why and for what purpose we, the voters, still need it after we have experienced a significant economic downturn.

  • A vision of Trinity Site with a few requirements

    I believe that there are some essential requirements and considerations that must be addressed before any other requirements for the Trinity Site.

    1. The Trinity Site must permanently increase our tax base. Without this increase, we will never be able to enhance the amenities in this community.

    2. The Trinity Site should have a core store that provides the missing essential shopping needs of Los Alamos. Unless this core store covers these shopping needs, our citizens will continue to shop off the Hill to the detriment of the entire retail community.

  • A diet that worked for me

    OK, the cat’s out of the bag. I drink a tea made from Slippery Elm Bark, Burdock Root, Sheep Sorrel and Blessed Thistle. It tastes like dirt. I eat a handful of pumpkin seeds, take multi-supplements and drink a glass of wine each day.

    Why do I do this? I did it because it could cure my cancer and because it meant the difference between being able to stay on a clinical trial or not.

    I bet my doctor is groaning as she reads this: “She thinks tea and wine are going to cure her. She’s a fruit loop! And I thought she was so sensible.”