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Today's Opinions

  • Abandon the plan to tear up Trinity Drive

    Roundabouts or not, the tearing up and rebuilding of Trinity Drive for a multi-year project will destroy those few small businesses, which still exist downtown, because the lab traffic will migrate to the truck route and Pajarito Road, bypassing the downtown business district altogether.   
    Choking Trinity to two lanes to make room for a bicycle lane may be politically correct, but it will be the economic death for the struggling Los Alamos retail community. We’ve already lost one of our favorite local stores, Cook’n in Style, and several other small businesses are on the ropes.

  • Stop sensationalizing family tragedy

    Freedom of the press is very important. Freedom of the press used to sensationalize a family tragedy to sell papers cannot be prevented, but I strongly object.
    The front-page headline and story in Wednesday’s Los Alamos Monitor compels me to object for these good people, friends, whose families have been in Los Alamos for generations, object in compassion for the mentally ill, object over endless rehashing of the story.
    Others feel the same, as well they should. Enough already.  

    Sue King
    Los Alamos

     

  • Some colorful governors

    Who were New Mexico’s most off-beat governors?  My choices are Dave Cargo, Gary Johnson and Clyde Tingley.
    It isn’t difficult for most New Mexicans to remember Gary Johnson. He was governor back just the other side of Bill Richardson.  It often seemed as though Johnson was more interested in his athletic feats than in being governor.
    But Johnson did attend to business, keeping New Mexico’s budget under firm control while pushing his libertarian views of restraining government from interfering in people’s business or private lives.

  • Just A Wag 08-19-11

    Smile for the camera

    Some angry parents are telling us that they are fed up with students smoking around Los Alamos High School, despite posted no smoking signs, and intend to snap photos of the smokers for Facebook.

    Send us your wags

    “Just a wag” features initial snippets of news heard around town.  The wags may grow to larger stories or simply remain snippets, either way this is meant to spark interest and provide food for thought.
    E-mail wags to lanews@lamonitor.com.

  • Expect redistricting fireworks

    New Mexico’s 2011 legislative redistricting of state political boundaries promises to be unique in terms of timing, content and politics.
    September special sessions are not unusual in New Mexico but a special session beginning this early in the month is rare.
    Redistricting special sessions normally are confined to that topic plus a few non-controversial items of a truly emergency nature. Not so this year.
    Until 10 years ago, New Mexico’s decennial redistricting sessions were fairly devoid of politics. The 2001 session shows us what likely will happen this year.

  • The more things change

    It’s human nature to cling to the familiar. We look at the way things are and we are comforted by the fact that things have always been this way and they’ll always stay this way.  
    Things that cost more are always better than things that cost less. Chicken soup will always cure any illness. The Earth has always revolved around the Sun.  
    And men have always been smarter than women (just don’t tell my wife I said that.)
    Life just seems to make more sense when we ignore the simple fact that things do change.
    One of my favorite subjects of change is standard units of measure. Take the inch for example. What could be more firmly rooted in history than the common inch?

  • New food emerges

    This summer has been filled with acrimony about the federal budget, with red versus blue politicians squaring off to hurl criticisms at each other.
    For a lot of us, turning on the news has felt like an exercise in masochism.
    Imagine my pleasure, then, at going to a recent meeting where Americans from quite different walks of life were gathered to learn together about something we all need – a nutritious food supply.
    On a recent and beautiful summer morn’ without even a breath of wind, a diverse group of citizens gathered on land belonging to Washington State University.

  • PRC drowning in perpetual angst

    The current Public Regulation Commission difficulties involving Jerome Block, Jr. aren’t the first time that five-member body has been in turmoil.
    In its dozen years of existence, it has been in almost constant disorder. The PRC was created in 1998 to replace a three-member state Corporation Commission that was always in havoc.
    The solution created by the New Mexico Legislature and passed by voters was to replace the Corporation Commission and the appointed Public Utilities Commission with one elected body that would be reined in by various popular “good government” features such as public financing and a ban on campaign donations or other favors from utilities they regulate.