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Today's Opinions

  • Elementary economics for Legislators

    We should have a mandatory economics class for legislators – not the inputs and outputs I slogged through at UNM but a nuts-and-bolts class on how local and state economies work.  

    This legislative session I tried to call attention to economic engines – golden geese – because when revenues drop and budget cutters look for targets, they can hinder economic recovery if they’re not careful or stoke those engines that create the jobs we need.

  • Tsunamis coming and the drinks are free

    SANTA FE — Ever since I was a kid, I have wanted to experience an earthquake, a tornado and a hurricane. My mother always was embarrassed when I would mention it in polite company. My wife just ignores me. There are other things that bother her more.

  • A gem of a compliment

    A scientific friend I work with paid me a compliment last summer that still rings in my little head. She said the garnet earrings I had on that day looked good. It was true (I modestly admit), but that’s not what impressed me. She next asked if I had found the garnets myself.

    Now that’s the way to make geologists really appreciate you as a human being.  Give ’em credit for a good find!

  • Have a spot of tea

    Both the Democrats and Republicans would do well to listen to what the Tea Partiers are saying. They might seem like a group of angry people, but they have real issues. They are concerned about jobs, income, wars and sense that Washington doesn’t care about them.  They are also concerned about same sex marriage, abortion and that man in the White House.

  • Petitions were rightly rejected

    I would like to respond to a long list of complaints (Monitor, Feb. 17) by one of the sponsors of two petitions that were rejected by the county council.  

    The petitions were appropriately rejected because they did not conform with a well-known principle of law governing the way questions are to be presented to voters on a ballot – i.e., no “logrolling:” Each question presented must be a single issue.

  • Atomic history: debating what’s kept

    The question is not whether history will be debated. If history is kept, the debate may be one of substance. If history fades out, the debate will be “sound and fury.”

    Keeping history strong and healthy is the goal of the proposed Manhattan Project National Historical Park, or some form of one.

  • N.M. enters the supercomputer age

    Until recently supercomputers were only available to scientists and high-end companies. The ability to simulate complex systems, such as new commercial aircraft, is of the utmost importance to large businesses. However, small-to-medium size businesses have been disadvantaged since they have not had access to supercomputers. And while the work done with the world’s fastest government computers was critical to our national defense, the public did not have the opportunity to access these computers to do non-defense work.

  • Lawmakers should finish their leftovers

    SANTA FE — Legislative leaders put up a fuss when Gov. Bill Richardson announced on the final day of the 2010 session that he would call them back into session six days later.

    The governor now has given them an additional six days to work out their differences before calling them back into session. March 1 is the new date.

    Several senators had said they thought a quick return was a bad idea. And they really won’t have any more information with a second six-day extension than they had at the close of the regular session.