.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • Standing against AT&T and Mobile merger

    Access to sufficient and affordable communication choices shape our ability to share and connect to information, resources and culture.
    At Young Women United, we have been incredibly concerned about the negative impacts an AT&T/T-Mobile merger would have on young women of color and all our communities.
    We applaud the Department of Justice for filing a lawsuit to halt this takeover, and calling the potential merger out for what it really is: an anti-competitive move that would raise prices and lessen quality of services for U.S. consumers, while putting more money in the pockets of gigantic corporations.

  • Snapshots of NM news

    Ours is a big state. Few others can boast population centers 492 miles apart, the distance between Farmington and Hobbs.
    Life being life, it’s easy to forget that the other corners of the state exist, much less take the time to pay attention to them.
    A few years ago, when doing Capitol Report New Mexico, I would survey community newspaper websites, taking a snapshot of local events. Recently I did the same survey. Sunday is the best day.
    In Columbus, businessman Philip Skinner wants a separate economic development group for the village.
    Southern Luna County gets too little attention from the group in Deming, Skinner says. (Deming Headlight, Sept. 16.)

  • Education's agonizing 'Catch 22'

    Education has made a big difference in the lives of many of us in Los Alamos. Funding reductions have forced our school district to make serious cuts in their operational budget, the portion that pays teachers’ salaries and other day to day costs.  
    State law does not allow us to tax ourselves to fund operational costs.  
    Over the past few years the amount available for professional development has shrunk by over $150,000.  Our teachers have not had a pay raise for four years.  
    These cuts will affect our children’s education and their future and the ability of Los Alamos National Laboratory to attract the best and brightest.

  • Plea to Demo Garden thieves

    An open letter to the people picking the vegetables from the downtown Demo Garden:
    All spring and summer, several dedicated children, led by Marion Goode and sponsored by 4H, took an empty piece of the Demo Garden, on the corner of  Oppenheimer and Central Avenue, and turned it into a vibrant vegetable garden.  
    In  doing this project, they learned a lot, beautified the town, and earned their level 1 certificate from the National Junior Master Gardener Program.
    Now as their vegetables are coming ripe — someone is stealing their produce. In early September, they found so many prized and nurtured items stolen, that it was difficult for them to pick sufficient produce to enter into the New Mexico State Fair.  

  • Landmarks threatened

    One of the most dangerous attacks on New Mexico’s wilderness and cultural legacy is currently underway. Bills working their way through the United States Congress right now could reverse regulations that have protected our treasured national landmarks for more than a century.
    By voting for an amendment that would debunk the president’s authority on designating sites as monuments, New Mexico’s own Rep. Steve Pearce has  positioned himself on the wrong side of a congressional battlefield with millions of acres of our public lands at stake.

  • Rethinking redistricting process

    In all the bombast and posturing of the recently concluded special legislative session for redistricting, there were moments of clarity.
    One of the best was an exchange between two of the house’s most effective representatives, who also happen to be the majority and minority floor leaders – Reps. Ken Martinez, D-Grants, and Tom Taylor, R-Farmington.
    Martinez, rarely ruffled, possesses a fine analytical mind. Taylor, smart and personable, possesses an extra measure of common sense, which can be a rare quality in the Roundhouse.
    Both try to see the other’s side of things.
    Redistricting is the painful, once-a-decade exercise of redistributing political districts to match the redistributed population.

  • Slow traffic to ascertain need for sound barrier

    There has been a great deal of discussion regarding MIG’s proposed roundabout design for NM 502/Trinity Drive. However, another project related to NM 502 that MIG has also been involved in has received very little coverage.
    Residents of the Eastern Area have drawn the county’s attention to the increased traffic noise in their neighborhood by asking for the construction of a sound barrier – a wall – to muffle the traffic noise.  

  • Fighting the law and saving money

     The laws of physical science teach us we can neither  create nor destroy energy. But it’s also a simple fact that we can surely waste it.
    And that raises the possibility of saving money by refusing to let energy slip through our fingers.  
    Typical families in the U.S. spend about $1,900 each year on home utility bills. That’s $160 per month. Your bills may be higher if your household consumes a lot of energy, if you heat with oil or if you live where the cost of electrical power is high.