Today's Opinions

  • NADG’s plan isn’t new

    OMG! Did you see the front page of the Jan. 3 Los Alamos Monitor?  I guess I just don’t get it. Am I the only one who thinks the North American Development Group (NADG) proposal for Trinity Site is exactly what we already have?  
    Just look at the drawing, come on folks, I could have come up with that for a lot less $$$. If this drawing depicts what “we” are looking for then gosh darn it plant a bunch of trees in the current Smith’s parking lot and have Smith’s expand into the property they already own.   

  • The more things change ... the more they stay the same

    On the state’s 75th anniversary of statehood, historian Richard Melzer asked how New Mexico’s economy – in 1987 and the previous 75 years – could be described in the same terms: alternately sunny and gloomy.
    We’re still asking that question this year on the statehood centennial.
    Melzer observed that the state’s successes resulted from a happy combination of resources and demand.
    Coal was discovered near Gallup and Raton just as railroads and smelters needed a source in the Southwest.
    World War II and the Cold War gave us the labs, which, in turn, launched or helped attract high-tech industry.
    After World War II, when the nation needed oil and natural gas, New Mexico had both in abundance.

  • Good luck grappling with legacy issues

    It is good to read in the Los Alamos Monitor (Nov.  22-23) that environmental remediation at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is starting to shift its emphasis.  
    A bias for action is starting to replace the New Mexico Environment Department’s (NMED) need to study things to death.
    In the first six years of the compliance order on consent, studies NMED required LANL to perform cost about $900 million and consumed more than 90 percent of the total budget for those years.   
    LANL already had 35 years of study and research before the order. NMED Secretary F. David Martin and the Martinez administration have a real challenge to reverse the NMED “bring me another rock” syndrome.

  • And so it begins...

    The sun rises in the morning. Breakfasts are scarfed down and drivers crowd the roads battling their way to work.  
    Shoppers hunt for bargains as food prices rise and paychecks are cut. Tired and frustrated workers on their way home curse as they sit in traffic jams.  
    Overcooked dinners are eaten while watching  reruns of “Housewives of Bayonne.”  
    Kids play video games as their homework collects dust. The sun shrugs and sinks out of sight, and the day comes to a close.
    A new year greets us with pretty much the same old same old, routines we’ve learned to master without having to exert any thought.  
    A new year, a new beginning, and the same old garbage we’re fed each day.

  • Historic Homestead Tour left off list

    Thank you for the story on upcoming New Mexico Centennial events in the Dec. 29 “Diversions,” however you missed an important one.   
    The Los Alamos County Council enthusiastically supported the creation of a Historic Homestead Tour in Los Alamos, outside of Department of Energy land.  
    In seven locations, 17 signs describing the history and extent of pre-Manhattan Project homesteads will be installed.
    This tour was selected as a New Mexico Centennial project, appropriately so as homesteading was the principal activity during 1912 in the location we think of as Los Alamos.

  • Humans can coexist with predators

    Who doesn’t love to watch birds around a feeder as you drink your coffee on a snowy winter morning?  
    After getting through the long dry winter of last year and the fires of summertime, I did.
    I waited to put our birdfeeder out until I was sure the bears were away.  
    The Las Conchas Fire destroyed habitat for the large predators in the county.
    If you watch black bears and mountain lions closely, you can tell when they are in flux. After the fire, these animals were forced to find new ranges.

  • Reverse engineering

    Two recent columns assured there is no worry about Iranian scientists reverse engineering the U.S. drone that mysteriously landed in Iran.
    But Santa Fe reader Mike Patel reminds that although Iranian scientists couldn’t reverse engineer a baby buggy, they can provide access to interested countries.
    Pitel notes that our friends in Pakistan gave China a look at our crashed stealth helicopter used in the killing of Osama bin Laden. They later gave us back the helicopter’s remains.
    Iran was asked to give the drone back but that’s not going to happen.
    And you can bet that China already has paid a visit to the drone and may eventually have it in its possession.

  • The irresistible resolve to control

    I feel one coming on, oh heck I feel a lot coming on. Oh no, I don’t want to do it but I can’t control the temptation.
    Yikes, here they come ... my New Year’s Resolutions.
    Ok, here goes. I resolve to grow my hair back in a month, my eyebrows in a week. I resolve to banish cancer from my body forever, and stop my husband nagging me.
    Oh hang on, but I have no control over any of those things, especially the last one!  Umm. What on earth am I going to do?
    Seems silly doesn’t it to try and control that which we have no power over, like our own health, but it’s often a reflex reaction when you’re diagnosed with cancer.