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Today's Opinions

  • Roundabout testimonial

    To the Los Alamos County Council and the Transportation Board:
    I drove through this roundabout on Central Avenue at 8th Street in Albuquerque during rush hour at 5:15 p.m., on a weekday last month, while pulling a large trailer with my large pickup:

    I came in from the west and headed east on Central Avenue. My observations include:
    •Central narrows from four lanes to two lanes. That was no problem (good signage) even though heavy traffic had to merge and I was driving a 35-40 foot rig.
    •Traffic was “queued” back about 10 vehicles, but kept moving at about 10 mph.

  • Roundabouts with left turns best bet

    What kind of community do Los Alamos and White Rock want to be? I have not  found many other places I’d live as I contemplate, with an eye on  retirement, whether to stay in Los Alamos or move on.
    Community  sustainability and a people friendly environment are major factors to weigh.
    Some say roundabouts increase local businesses. While that is true, one of  the downsides of Los Alamos County is the lack of businesses along the  roundabout route.
    Is this county business unfriendly? In comparison to  alternative communities, I’d have to conclude that Los Alamos needs to  rethink its lack of support of entrepreneurship and the road blocks to  business we’ve created.

  • Board actions questioned

    The LAPS Board ultimately decides which community organizations can rent the Duane W. Smith Auditorium (DWSA) and what these organizations can perform. This is reasonable.
    The board should not, for example, allow performances that go against the LAPS policy on temporary/long-term use of school facilities (1330-3270), which states that school facilities such as the theater are for the educational benefit of the people of Los Alamos and that “district buildings and facilities should be available, subject to reasonable conditions, to ... organizations for activities that foster the educational, cultural .... or social development of the community.

  • Owners need to keep control of their dogs

    A few days ago, I took my two dogs (a little Papillion and a yellow Lab) on their daily walk near the golf course. My dogs are always on a leash anytime they’re out of our fenced yard.
    As we neared the golf course, we heard coyotes, so I was on guard to deal with them if necessary.
    What I next saw was a lady and her three dogs (two German Shepherd mixes and a Lab) headed our way. Her dogs were running free, with no sign of a leash.
    I moved off the trail and picked my Papillion up. As they neared, one of the Shepherds spotted us and started running toward us. I yelled at the lady to control her dogs, to no avail.

  • Playing games for sustainability

    I call the computer the bringer of prospects. A few odd souls will think of computing. Most think of video games, texting, or e-books.
    Environmental thinkers may think of smart cars and paperless records. Rare is the breed hooked on sustainability games, a many-pronged teaching tool.
    Who knows? Games may be the best hope that the world’s youth will work out the problems we pass to them.
    “Sustainability games” are computer games that test a player’s skill at prolonging the world’s use of natural resources and the environment. The games take many forms.

  • Martinez hits some turbulence with state plane fiasco

    SANTA FE — Gov. Susana Martinez’s administration has been taken to task for misuse of a state airplane. The basics of the situation sound reasonable for the state to have undertaken.
    A production crew shooting a pilot for at TV series was stuck in Las Vegas, N.M., and needed to take a look at the Cumbres and Toltec Railroad in Chama.
    They called the head of the state film office who offered to get a state plane to fly them up. She checked with the state transportation director, two cabinet secretaries, two top state lawyers and the governor’s office.

  • Letter grades better than AYP

    Making AYP.
    This bit of education jargon has hung like a sword over schools and educators since the Bush administration introduced No Child Left Behind in 2001. In an attempt at accountability, the yardstick called Annual Yearly Progress was supposed to push schools and students toward improvement. But in design and implementation, it guaranteed that most schools would eventually not make AYP.
    So it’s hard to get excited about the new initiative, letter grades for schools. The governor considers it one of her education reform planks, and it won support from Democratic education leaders in the Legislature. Sen. Cynthia Nava, chair of the Senate Education Committee, supported the idea because it recognized growth and not just the watermark of proficiency.

  • Thanks for the scoop

    I would like to thank Dan’s Cafe for the 2,000 scoops of ice cream they gave away on Tuesday evening. You are very generous. My family looks forward to the free scoop night every year. It is a good opportunity to see friends and of course, have a lot a of ice cream. I myself contributed two scoops to that number of 2,000.
    The pinwheels were really nice and added to the fun. I liked to stick mine in my scoop of ice cream.
    Thank you so much. We look forward to seeing you throughout the year and again at free scoop night next year.

    Faith Koh
    Los Alamos