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Today's Opinions

  • Nonlinear model helps businesses prep for rapid growth

    New Mexico entrepreneurs who want to start a business or take an existing venture to the next level need a model that allows the business to “scale up” – to improve profitability as demand increases for its product or service.
    A scalable model attracts more investors because it equips the business to adapt to a larger market without significantly increasing its costs. And that has a positive impact on economic development in New Mexico, where a home-grown business that’s prepared for exponential growth brings more out-of-state money home.
    Different paths
    Many entrepreneurs are content to grow in a linear, conservative fashion: When sales increase, the business hires more people or buys more capital to accommodate bigger demand. The business has a stable bottom line, but its profitability doesn’t increase over time or it crawls slowly and inefficiently upward.
    A business with a scalable model, by contrast, aims for faster, cheaper growth by breaking up the sales growth/cost growth relationship. It grows exponentially by keeping costs stagnant when sales ramp up.

  • Making a well requires luck and science

    As a rule, New Mexico oil and gas production is out of sight and, therefore, out of mind. Even in the production areas of the southeast and northwest, I suspect a goodly proportion of people not directly involved have only a general sense of what happens.
    Even the financial impacts manifest only in a general way. In good times, state government gets oil and gas money and expands. In less good times, such as today, less money appears and government, though crunched, expands anyway. Local effects, though, are immediate for good or bad.
    At the recent Legislative Finance Committee meeting in Artesia, staff at Elite Well Services and Nick Agopian of Devon Energy walked through the steps in making an oil well. Overall, the Delaware Basin in New Mexico and Texas within the Permian Basin is a “world class oil and gas play,” Agopian said. The term “play” means (thank you Wikipeda) an area with the same geology (to over simplify).
    Each well costs from $1 million to $8 million. In most communities, an $8 million business investment merits a headline.
    The tasks are complicated, difficult, technical and not obvious to the passerby. The work requires much science and a fair amount of luck.

  • Save New Mexico’s historic sites!

    New Mexico is about to fire Billy the Kid.
    Coronado, Victorio, the conquistadores, and the U. S. Cavalry are getting the sack, too.
    Visitors come here to see these icons at the state’s seven historic sites. Just in time for peak tourist season, the state Cultural Affairs Department announced a draconian plan to kick out the very people who know the most about these sites – their managers.
    The department announced a plan in late May to save money by reorganizing the Historic Sites Division, combing six sites into three regions with new managers. This would affect Jemez, Coronado, Fort Selden, Camino Real, Lincoln and Fort Stanton historic sites. Bosque Redondo and Los Luceros aren’t affected (yet). Another six positions department-wide are also on the block. But the department wants to hire 13 “critical employees,” including three PR people.
    Terminations are effective Aug. 3, if the State Personnel Board approves the plan at its July 21 meeting.
    Let’s recall that during the legislative session, declining revenues forced lawmakers to shrink the budget and give the administration permission to do more cutting, if necessary.
    It’s always a grim process, but in reducing costs, two principles ought to be at work. First, spread the pain evenly.

  • Stronger state economy requires shared vision and collaboration

    BY WILLIAM F. FULGINITI
    Executive Director, New Mexico Municipal League

  • There are better ways to ‘pull together’ for New Mexico’s impoverished kids

    BY VERONICA C. GARCIA, Ed.D.
    Executive Director, New Mexico Voices for Children

  • LFC in Artesia: Ominous federal regulatory clouds over oil and gas

    Just how little we know about the New Mexico world around us is one lesson from the mid-June visit to Artesia by the Legislative Finance Committee’s traveling summer road show.
    Massive danger from Obama administration regulatory overreach (putting it politely) is another lesson.
    Holding meetings around the state allows legislators to get some direct knowledge of people and activities and provides an opportunity for those, such as Eddy County Commissioners Stella Davis and James Walterscheid, who both attended the Artesia session, to get acquainted with respected senators and representatives.
    LFC members coming to Artesia included Sen. John Arthur Smith, Deming; Rep Jimmie Hall, Albuquerque; Rep. Paul Bandy, Aztec; Sen. Carlos Cisneros, Questa; Rep. Jason Harper, Albuquerque; Sen. Carroll Leavell, Jal; and Rep. Patricia Lundstrom, Gallup.
    Oil was the topic for the day in Artesia. One illustration of different legislator perspective came as the group toured Elite Well Services (elitewells.com). The firm and its facilities are a long way from Sandia National Laboratories where Jason Harper, R-Rio Rancho, earns his living. Employment of the highest technologies connects Elite and Sandia. A layman-level summary of extracting oil was a highlight at Elite Services.

  • Letters to the Editor 8-24-16

    Why don’t people go to church anymore?

    One answer:
    I don’t need to go to church and I need that time to get ready for the coming  week. I am a very busy person  and I need that time to relax and take care around the house..
    Another answer:
    Church people are hypocritical and don’t live up to their standards. I can teach my own children about morals and right and wrong. As I find time.
    And another answer;
    What’s the see if GOD is all knowing, all seeing and all powerful why does he allow mayhem, sickness, poverty and war, what good is a church?
    In White Rock Presbyterian Church we don’t pretend to be perfect and we are constantly questioning ourselves, hopefully learning from the words of Jesus Christ. We believe in resurrection and no one can enter into heaven except through Jesus, who took the blame for our transgressions. Without Christ, we are committed to carry a full measure of all our wrongdoing forever. Forgiveness allows us to be free of guilt.

  • Letters to the Editor 8-17-16

    New WIPP Accident Theory Implausible

    A new theory advanced by Charles Bowman that a hydrogen deflagration caused the 2014 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant accident is implausible. It contains errors and omissions that should be corrected.
    I spent most of my 30-plus years of corporate experience dealing with TRU waste. As the manager of the Los Alamos National Laboratory plutonium analysis section, I had hands-on generation of portions of LANL’s TRU waste. Under contract to Sandia National Lab, I led a LANL team to conduct many lab experiments on alpha radiolytic gas generation of TRU waste under conditions expected at WIPP. Al Zerwekh, mentioned by Bowman, was a member of this team.  This was followed by my working in LANL’s TRU waste management operations developing strategies to work off LANL’s TRU waste inventory based on its characteristics. I am a LANL retiree – “Class of 2005.”