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Today's Opinions

  • The case of Gov. Martinez vs. New Mexico courts

    What’s up with the governor and the state’s judicial system?
    As she directed some of her angrier vetoes to the courts in the last few years, we had to wonder. This year, State Supreme Court Chief Justice Charles Daniels said the courts are “on life support.”
    Remember that our founding New Mexico fathers intended the three branches of government – executive, legislative and judicial – to be on an equal footing.
    Let’s look at a timeline.
    Jan. 22, 2011: Daniels told legislators the judiciary had cut to the bone, closing some magistrate courts, reducing expenses, freezing hiring and leaving vacancies unfilled, even as workload increased because of the economic downturn.
    Jan. 25, 2011: Daniels ruled against Gov. Susana Martinez, who tried to keep two environmental regulations from taking effect. “No one is above the law,” Daniels said.
    Also in 2011 District Judge Sarah Singleton in Santa Fe ruled against Martinez’s attempt to have the Motor Vehicle Department verify the residency status of foreign nationals with New Mexico driver’s licenses.
    2012: A judge in the Second Judicial District ordered Martinez to remove the names of most people on the state’s payroll information from the Sunshine Portal. She published the names elsewhere.

  • Credit union merger to create largest NM owned financial institution

    Two Albuquerque credit unions are merging. The combination of Sandia Laboratory Federal Credit Union and Kirtland Federal Credit Union will have total assets of just over $3 billion, which makes for the largest New Mexico based financial institution and more than double the $1.4 billion In assets recorded by Los Alamos National Bank in September.
    Los Alamos National has had the “largest-local” title since its bigger brethren were sold to companies such as Well Fargo and Bank of America more than 20 years ago.
    Robert Chavez, Sandia president and CEO, will lead the combined company. Chavez is an alumnus of Sunwest Bank.
    The two credit unions have an enviable customer base (credit union customers are called “members”) that combines the people from Albuquerque’s research establishment (Sandia National Laboratories) and the military, which is most everything else on Kirtland Air Force Base.
    These people are steadily employed, decently paid and loyal. Bankers should be so lucky.
    After jumping the regulatory hoops, the deal is expected to be done by the end of 2017.

  • Nonprofit lender helps machine shop expand, diversify client portfolio

    FINANCE NEW MEXICO

  • Jobs bills moving despite partisan wrangling

    Lawmakers are more focused on job creation in this legislative session, but jobs bills still get high-centered on ideological speed bumps.
    The Democrats this year offered a six-part plan that’s a shade better than their past packages. They would spend $63 million in capital outlay on infrastructure repairs and improvements, pass a modest minimum wage increase, increase broadband access, allow industrial hemp research, and try to open economic development incentives to home-grown businesses.
    Of the bunch, only broadband would be a home run.
    This year’s capital outlay has already seen partisan wrangling. A Republican lawmaker proposed giving up capital outlay to help stanch red ink, an interesting idea considering the problems with our capital outlay process. Democrats refused, and the governor bashed them for refusing.
    Capital outlay is a different creature in the rural areas. While the cities might forego their public works money for a year, smaller communities rely on it for needed projects. And the spending is a form of stimulus. Just ask the state’s construction companies.
    A minimum wage increase isn’t economic development, but it needs to happen. Our current rate is $7.50, and lots of states are higher.  

  • Letters to the Editor 2-10-17

    Support HB 123, a bill that addresses overpopulation of unwanted animals

    I write in support of House Bill 123, a bill that responds to legislative momentum to address New Mexico’s overpopulation of unwanted companion animals, a problem which results in the euthanasia of 60,000 dogs and cats each year.
    HB 123 creates a non-appropriations based mechanism for funding state low-cost spay/neuter through a $100 a year surcharge on pet food companies for each dog or cat food product type sold here, raising about $750,000 a year. Unwanted companion animals are a statewide epidemic that impacts not only dogs and cats, but New Mexico’s families and counties. Counties, in particular, bear the fiscal brunt of this statewide problem. For example, a 2012 study on the scope and impact of animal overpopulation showed that collectively counties budgeted $27 million in 2011 to fund animal shelters (an increase of $2.1 million from 2008), even as upwards of 80 percent of shelters’ animals were euthanized. In 2012, those costs increased, as we would expect.

  • LEDA key to building New Mexico’s economic future

    BY REP. KELLY FAJARDO
    R-Valencia, New Mexico House of Representatives

  • Redemption plan sought, non-plan offered

    General thinking has slipped into New Mexico’s public dialogue. The two approaches—one from the left, the other from the right or, maybe, center right—aren’t nearly as deeply systemic as this column desires. But, hey, ya gotta start somewhere. For sure, these ideas are orders of magnitude more useful than the narrow ideological menus offered last year by the two parties at their preprimary conventions. The Democrats said: abortion and unions. The Republicans said: no abortion.
    The good deeds come from Alan Webber and Harvey Yates. Both come with a high-level political history. Such history cannot be shed, no matter how hard one tries. Thus, the political history occupies part of the context of the policy thinking.
    Webber, a Democrat, ran for governor in 2014. He finished second in the primary, 12 points behind Gary King who then was trounced by Gov. Susana Martinez. A founding editor of Fast Company magazine, he came to New Mexico after “investors” sold the magazine. Earlier he worked in Oregon alternative media and city and state politics. In Massachusetts Webber edited Harvard Business Review and advised governors including Michael Dukakis.

  • Will Trump sink pipeline projects with protectionist impulses?

    The Wall Street Journal on reviving the Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines:

    President Trump is making short work of campaign promises, and on Tuesday he signed executive orders reviving the Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines. The resurrection is good news for the economy, but one question is whether he’ll sink the projects with his protectionist impulses.
    Mr. Trump signed an executive order inviting TransCanada to apply again for a permit for the Keystone XL pipeline, which the Obama Administration rejected to indulge the anti-carbon obsessions of Democratic campaign donors. Another Trump directive aims to expedite the Dakota Access pipeline, which is 90 percent finished but was halted by President Obama amid protests. A federal judge ruled that the government had met its legal obligations, but the Obama Administration suspended work anyway.
    Such carve outs for progressive constituencies are one reason voters rejected Democrats in November, and the pipelines promise broader prosperity. Keystone is predicted to spin off 20,000 construction and manufacturing jobs, many of them to be filled by union workers, and add $3 billion to GDP.