.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • Prepare for Medicare price changes in 2017

    BY NATHAN SILLIN
    Practical Money Skills

  • What New Mexico’s tax-hikers don’t want you to know

    BY D. DOWD MUSKA
    New Mexico’s Rio Grande Foundation

  • How do you get middle school girls hooked on STEM?

    Although women comprise a small fraction of tech professionals—just one in four, according to the National Center for Women & Information Technology —several nonprofits and startups are working to jumpstart women’s participation in computer science.

    In a previous column, I considered Grace Hopper Academy, a New York City coding bootcamp designed explicitly for women. GHA’s sister school, Fullstack Academy, takes that program online with a Remote Immersive program. Most recently, I examined how the Campaign for Female Education (Camfed) has expanded female educational access in sub-Saharan Africa using big data. But what about middle school girls here in the United States?

    Middle school is perhaps the most prudent place to promote female participation in STEM, according to several studies. Given that many girls rule out tech careers by high school, educators and administrators would be wise to pique student interest before it’s too late. A Philadelphia-based non-profit called TechGirlz takes that challenge seriously.

  • Credit union merger to create largest NM owned financial institution

    Two Albuquerque credit unions are merging. The combination of Sandia Laboratory Federal Credit Union and Kirtland Federal Credit Union will have total assets of just over $3 billion, which makes for the largest New Mexico based financial institution and more than double the $1.4 billion In assets recorded by Los Alamos National Bank in September.
    Los Alamos National has had the “largest-local” title since its bigger brethren were sold to companies such as Well Fargo and Bank of America more than 20 years ago.
    Robert Chavez, Sandia president and CEO, will lead the combined company. Chavez is an alumnus of Sunwest Bank.
    The two credit unions have an enviable customer base (credit union customers are called “members”) that combines the people from Albuquerque’s research establishment (Sandia National Laboratories) and the military, which is most everything else on Kirtland Air Force Base.
    These people are steadily employed, decently paid and loyal. Bankers should be so lucky.
    After jumping the regulatory hoops, the deal is expected to be done by the end of 2017.

  • Letter to the Editor 2-8-17

    That gut-wrenching pain

    Have you felt that painful, tightening, gut-wrenching feeling when you hear someone state something that infringes upon your rights or beliefs?
    Good, that means you’re human. The feeling comes from an emotional system that helps us survive.
    Have you allowed that feeling to develop into anger towards the one expressing the statement?
    That’s not good. It’s true that anger is part of our humanity, but it comes from the lowest and most ancient parts of our brain, one we share with lizards.
    Have you taken an oppositional stance of the idea or policy that was stated?
    That’s good. You’re using the higher levels of your brain to do something constructive with that painful feeling you felt initially.
    Is your opposition causing you to see the one who made the statement as someone from another group that’s evil?
    That’s not good. You’re letting the lower levels of your brain control the higher levels. You’re developing what we call hatred.
    Is your opposition directed at the idea or policy that was stated with the understanding that the one who made the statement is your brother or sister?

  • Letter to the Editor 2-5-17

    Ellen Ben-Naim is my choice for school board

    Los Alamos has an opportunity for fresh, community-minded leadership on the school board. Ellen Ben-Naim will provide new insights and vigorous advocacy for teachers and students. As a professional educator with a master’s degree and enormous community experience, Ellen will provide oppressive teacher evaluation, mental health, increase teacher salaries and reduce oppressive teacher evaluation. Ellen is an excellent people-connector and communicator. She will serve our community well.
    Ellen supports mental health issues and is committed to enacting recommendations from the Mental Health Design Team Plan. These mental health issues, including stress and depression, affect our students and faculty. Ellen recognizes the need for more community awareness around these issues.
    Ellen has a child attending Los Alamos High School. She understands the issues of today’s families and she is committed to voicing these perspectives.
    As a community-oriented person, Ellen spent four years as a the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board program coordinator. She has enthusiastically served on many LAPS committees, including the School Budget Committee, School Bond Committee, District Parent Council and GATE Advisory Committee.

  • Letters to the Editor 2-3-17

    Time is approaching for seasonal employees

    While we are still in the icy grip of winter, summer is not that far off and with it will come a small crowd of summer seasonal employees, here to work the season and looking for a place to live.
    With the ever-tightening housing market in Los Alamos and the requirement for yearly leases, summer employees find it difficult to locate housing.
    Los Alamos National Laboratory often dominates the scene with its summer interns and techs that visit for projects during the summer, allowing few opportunities for others. Santa Fe and Española have housing available, but the distance and price make it much more costly and less efficient.
    Most summer seasonals will start their season in April or May (some even earlier) and finish up in the fall around October. If you have a small apartment, efficiency or room available that you would be willing to rent for less than the usual 12 months, to an outgoing, pleasant, quiet, hardworking (hopefully) person, please let me know and I can pass on this information to those who are looking for a place to stay this summer.
    Brian Kliesen
    White Rock

    Apologies to drivers
    running amok around town

  • How poor do we want to be?

    Three little words will generate a lot of heated words during this legislative session: To be determined.
    This is how the Legislative Finance Committee, meeting between April and December, indicates the source of money to help balance the budget in fiscal 2018. “To be determined” is shorthand for more cuts on top of cuts already made or new revenue in the form of tax increases.
    Before you jump to a conclusion about that choice, take a minute to grasp where we are. The choices made in this session will decide how poor New Mexico will be in coming years.
    All the usual clichés about “belt tightening,” “trimming the fat,” “low hanging fruit” and “right-sizing” no longer apply. In previous years, the governor and Legislature have made across-the-board cuts to state agencies, and those cuts continue. This year, they have to decide who gets hurt.
    The proposed victims, according to proposals from the executive and legislative branches, are schools, higher education (big time), courts, fire departments, law enforcement, economic development, water, tribes, local communities, state employees and teachers, and wildlife.
    Let’s see, did they miss anybody? Our unpaid legislators even cut their own feed bill, which funds the current session.