.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • Election 2016: Slime attacks, upsets and close calls

    Gov. Susana Martinez will face a legislature firmly in the hands of Democrats after this election. On the other hand, she got rid of the chief thorn in her side, Senate Majority Leader Michael Sanchez.
    At this writing, the results are still new and not entirely final. Political pundits will be sorting out this election for a long time, but there are some takeaways.
    The big news here is that Democrats took back the House. After two bitter years of Republican control, we might expect to see some payback, but I hope they focus on the state’s business. Similarly, the Senate is a little more blue than red.
    The leadership shuffle in the House will probably make Rep. Brian Egolf, of Santa Fe, the new speaker. Keep an eye on the powerful House Appropriations and Finance Committee, where Gallup’s Rep.
    Patty Lundstrom has not only the seniority but the knowledge to be chair. And, fellas, women have been a little scarce in leadership positions.
    Incumbents often had the advantage, but not always.
    Newcomer Greg Baca overwhelmed Michael Sanchez after an expensive, ugly campaign. Advance New Mexico Now, a super PAC operated by the governor’s political adviser Jay McCleskey, dropped more than $370,000 on TV advertising alone, according to New Mexico In Depth.

  • Air Force veteran’s business growth enabled by Accion

    BY FINANCE NEW MEXICO
    Gary Peterson’s Albuquerque auto shop is a profit-generator with philanthropy at its heart.
    Peterson, a 22-year Air Force veteran, started One Community Auto in Albuquerque to refurbish rundown vehicles and donate the sales proceeds to a variety of charities, from Assistance Dogs of the West to veteran suicide-prevention and domestic violence prevention programs. He calls this aspect of his business “social entrepreneurship.”
    The company’s newest endeavor involves providing abandoned or wrecked cars to organizations that demolish them in training exercises.
    Cars for causes
    Peterson is under contract with the Air Force Training Academy at Goodfellow Air Force Base in San Angelo, Texas, to supply 250 vehicles to train firefighters how to safely extricate people from cars after accidents and other emergencies. His company also made a deal to provide cast-off cars that can be used for target practice.
    This novel business model is just what Peterson had in mind when he retired from the military three years ago: He wanted to start a business using the skills he acquired in the Air Force, but he wanted a large part of his earnings to support his philanthropic causes.

  • Changes to FAFSA make it easier to apply for student aid

    BY NATHAN SILLIN
    Practical Money Skills

  • Letters to the Editor 11-11-16

    PEEC thanks community, volunteers for successful Pajarito Trail Fest race

    The Pajarito Environmental Education Center would like to thank the organizers, volunteers and runners of the Pajarito Trail Fest race for once again donating a portion of the proceeds to PEEC to help get kids outside.
    The Trail Fest is an amazing event for our community. Not only is it well-run, providing excellent support and fun for the participants, it gives back to many community groups.
    This year they gave out a total of $5,500. In the spirit of the Trail Fest, PEEC will use the funds given to get kids outside on the trails, both as part of school and for fun. We’re so grateful that the Pajarito Trail Fest has supported our work for many years. A special thank you to race director Petra Pirc for helping us to raise the next generation of trail lovers.
    Katherine Watson
    Executive Director, PEEC

    LAAC thanks community for Pumpkin Glow success

    On behalf of the Los Alamos Arts Council, I would like to thank the community for coming out and supporting the Pumpkin Glow.

  • Vaping industry meets resistance in Congress

    BY PAUL J. GESSING
    Rio Grande Foundation

  • The VA health care lesson

    BY BOB HAGAN
    Coffee on a Cold Morning

  • Letters to the Editor 11-6-2016

    Support for
    Stover for State Rep. Dist. 43 

     

    I am supporting Sharon Stover for State Representative. I have known and worked with Sharon for years, and she has always been kind, dependable and inclusive. Sharon is a leader with knowledge of Los Alamos and New Mexico, competent and professional.

    I am speaking to one issue that has surfaced.  Many people have tried to suggest her actions regarding issuing same-sex marriage licenses in Los Alamos County were motivated by bias.  Rather than acting from bias, however, Sharon was part of a Professional and unified effort by all 33 county clerks in New Mexico to get the courts to decide on one standard for the whole state.  I believe their actions were courageous and necessary since the Legislature at the time refused to resolve the issue through the appropriate method -- legislation. As soon as the New Mexico judge affirmed a ruling for same sex marriage and the New Mexico Supreme also affirmed it, the Los Alamos County Clerk’s office has issued marriage licenses to same sex couples since September 2013.

  • Public art is tool for economic, community development

    Public art has been a force for economic development in New Mexico at least since the Great Depression, when the federal government paid hundreds of unemployed artists to create murals, sculpture and other artworks that grace federal buildings to this day. 

    Nearly a century later, many New Mexico cities are using public art projects to promote economic vitality by creating a foundation for community identity, centralizing disparate neighborhoods with a collective vision and attracting the attention of businesses that value culturally vibrant communities. One of those cities is Rio Rancho.

    “Public art speaks to our culture and how we value the places we live in,” said Daniel Chamberlain, an architect with FBT Architects and chairman of Rio Rancho’s volunteer Arts Commission. “It is a wonderful negotiator of vision. It’s a quality-of-life driver.”

    The payback can be enormous, Chamberlain said, even if it’s hard to measure. 

    Committed to the arts