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Today's Opinions

  • Judge Gorsuch rates applause for decisions in Indian Country

    Indian Country, surprisingly, supports the nomination of Neil Gorsuch to the U. S. Supreme Court.
    The Native American Rights Fund and the National Congress of American Indians recently endorsed the nominee. NARF, in case you haven’t heard of it, has been at the forefront of Indian law for nearly a half century.
    “Judge Gorsuch has significantly more experience with Indian law cases than any other recent Supreme Court nominee,” NARF informed tribal leaders recently.
    That high praise and a number of tribal endorsements (including the Navajo Nation), have transformed Gorsuch into something of a hero among Native American rights advocates, but it may be premature.
    During his years on the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals Gorsuch has participated in 39 Indian cases, of which 28 involved significant questions of Indian law.
    Out of those 28 cases, tribal interests won 16, or 57 percent, NARF said.
    The late Justice Antonin Scalia routinely opposed tribal interests, and the rest of the Supremes haven’t been receptive to tribal arguments, so Gorsuch compares favorably.
    Most important to tribes is the concept of tribal sovereignty.
    Tribal sovereignty is one of those concepts that freshman legislators and lawyers new to the Southwest trip over once.

  • Albuquerque scores the jobs for January-to-January year

    Randomly touring the state’s job numbers is worthy if only for the ritual. Trend reminders lurk—Albuquerque’s apparent economic dominance reappearing and rural problems. Another element is the Legislature’s cut-and-paste budget that kicks the can of real change so far down the road that it produces just a distant plink as it bounces.
    Over the month from December 2016 to January 2017, the state lost 19,400 jobs, 1,300 more than the 18,100 dropped from December 2015 to January 2016. For the year just past, the state’s 900-job increase represents a slight reversal from the 1,800 jobs lost between January 2015 and January 2016.
    The January 2016 to January 2017 net job performance for New Mexico’s four metro areas was 2,300 more wage jobs. Albuquerque and Las Cruces respectively added 3,800 and 800 jobs. Farmington lost 1,800 and Santa Fe, 500. The state added a net of 900 jobs, meaning that the 26 rural counties lost 1,400 jobs (2,300 minus 900 = 1,400).
    The 6.7 percent January unemployment rate that got the headlines was seasonally adjusted. The unadjusted January rate was 7 percent. The February rate increased to 6.8 percent, again seasonally adjusted.

  • Algae’s best times may lie ahead

    An algae bloom, also known as an algal bloom, is but one of the ways this old, old life form makes news. An algae bloom can look like a floating green garden, a red tide or a muddy brown oil spill.
    Algae is the collective term for a large and diverse group of aquatic plants that were early ramblers on Earth. Besides a long history, algae also have a rare ability to grow fast. An algae bloom is a rapid growth in the population of algae in a local aquatic system. Depending on the algae, blooms have special colors and can do great harm to an ecosystem. The toxic effects of some algae blooms can kill fish and mammals and threaten urban water supplies. Researchers are finding ways to combat the damage from these sudden overgrowths.
    Meanwhile, other researchers are busy finding ways to get more good from the good algae, of which there are many. The oddities of algae may help fill two of the modern world’s fast growing needs – food and fuels.
    Algae were food fit for guests in ancient China. Similar discoveries were made in Japan, Hawaii and even cropped up in Ireland.
    After World War II, a taste for seaweed, or “nori,” spread to the US with
    Japanese food. As the land gets more crowded, interest grows in the possibilities of algae for food.

  • Practical financial planning for parents

    Nathaniel Sillen

    Practical Money Skills

  • When legislators tackle big reforms, movement translates as progress

    Lawmakers this year took on some major reforms of old issues hovering over the state like turkey vultures waiting for road kill.  
    Interest groups ranging from Common Cause to the Greater Albuquerque Chamber of Commerce proclaimed progress. Maybe not as much as we hoped, but progress.
    The big reform bills were ethics, campaign finance, capital outlay, payday lending and taxes. Many were bipartisan.
    Years in the making, the ethics bill began bravely by standing up an independent ethics commission with subpoena power, protected by the Constitution. When it emerged after pummeling in various hearings, it was missing language that required complaints and hearings to be public, and the Legislature, not the law, will determine the commission’s powers and rules.
    Changes reflect legislators’ residual fear that the commission could become a political weapon.
    So voters in November 2018 will decide on a constitutional amendment creating an independent ethics commission.
    Common Cause and business groups cheered. New Mexico Ethics Watch booed, saying lawmakers gutted a strong bill.
    Kudos to Rep. Jim Dines, R-Albuquerque, who patiently listened to input and welcomed suggestions. The hearings themselves were a marvel. Instead of trying to kill the bill, lawmakers worked with Dines to fine tune the bill.

  • Letters to the Editor 3-29-17

    County plan to build Splash Pad bad idea

    I just read in the Daily Post that the Los Alamos County Council is considering building a Splash Pad park in White Rock. My initial response was “Boy the county can’t wait to spend our tax dollars on nonsense once again.”
    The worst part of it is that they want to borrow more money to get this project and others done!  It seems to me that we haven’t learned anything from watching our National Government take us, the citizens, into debt that could possibly collapse our economy!  
    Do you realize that the Splash Pad area is a bad idea - let me share the reasons why I think it is.
    It will only be used a maximum of two months out of the year during hot weather. These type of projects are built in Phoenix and other places where they can be utilized several months out of the year.
    The cost of building this park is not worth going into debt for.
    It will be built in White Rock which means it will only serve that community for the most part.
    Once again, as citizens of Los Alamos/White Rock, we will be stuck with subsidizing maintenance, etc.  

  • Running out the clock on New Mexico’s future

    BY REP. JASON HARPER
    R-Rio Rancho, New Mexico House of Representatives

  • Healthcare change asks hard questions about cost and services

    “In America, we don’t leave people bleeding in the doorway of the emergency room.”  I wrote that line for a presentation I used to give, some 25 years ago, about medical care in workers’ compensation.
    There had been a time when some American hospitals did exactly that. Even in emergencies, patients had to produce an insurance card before they would be treated. A federal law was enacted in 1986 prohibiting hospitals from turning away patients in emergencies.
    The system has been been battling ever since over who pays. The hospital? The taxpayers? The patient with no money? The Affordable Care Act offers one solution by requiring everybody to be insured and providing subsidies.
    The “individual mandate” is one thing many Americans detest about the ACA. So, among the features of the new proposed healthcare law it took Congressional Republicans only six years to draft, the individual mandate is to be repealed. Young healthy people who think they don’t need insurance won’t have to buy it.
    But young healthy people can get sick or injured. What does the proposed law anticipate when a young healthy uninsured person shows up with broken bones from a motorcycle accident? Who will pay the bill? Or will we go back to letting him bleed? That has to be one of our questions.