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Today's Opinions

  • Business tools empower owners to shape their financial future

    Entrepreneurs are naturally passionate about providing a service or product, but many avoid digging into the financial aspects of running a small business — perhaps because they don’t have simple tools that can help them understand their finances.
    This avoidance can cost a business dearly, because financial success requires that the owner understand the target customer, how to price a product or service and how to keep track of cash flowing in and out of the business.
    It all begins with understanding who — if anyone — wants the product or service the business is selling.
    “Businesses can’t take a shotgun approach to marketing,” said Kim Blueher, vice president of lending at WESST — a nonprofit lender and small-business development and training organization with six offices in New Mexico. A marketing strategy needs to be based on “a realistic picture of how many
    people want their product.”
    At WESST, Kim and Amy Lahti teach business clients how to identify that customer. They also introduce clients to simple spreadsheets that help them compute how many products or services the business needs to sell to cover expenses and make a profit.

  • Thank you: Spring food drive a success

    Your local Boy Scouts and Letter Carriers (NALC-4112) would like to thank the community for their generosity in supporting the LA Cares Food Bank with your donations of food and supplies during last weekend’s Spring Food Drive. We would also like to take this opportunity to thank RE/MAX Realty, Knights of Columbus No. 3137, Smith’s Foods, Los Alamos Monitor, Los Alamos Daily Post, KRSN 1490, TRK Management, Retired and Senior Volunteers, and Los Alamos County for providing a variety of resources that support the food drive.  
    Additional donations of non-perishable food and personal care supplies to LA Cares are accepted year-round at the aquatic center and at Los Alamos County Social Services at 1505 15th Street, Suite A, during regular business hours. Monetary donations can be sent to: LA Cares, P.O. Box 248, Los Alamos, N.M. 87544.
    Thank you for helping to battle hunger in our community and mark your calendar for our next food drive that will be this fall on Nov. 21.
     
    Bill Blumenthal
    Northern New Mexico District – Boy Scouts of America
    Food Drive Coordinator
     Terry Jones
    National Association of
    Letter Carriers – 4112
    Food Drive Coordinator

  • National park visitors boost state’s economy

    The next time you see an out-of-state plate on the road this summer, you might take a moment to thank the National Park Service.
    According to an NPS study, visitors to New Mexico’s national parks and monuments make an important contribution to our state’s economy.
    In 2014, park visitors spent an estimated $88.8 million in local communities while visiting NPS lands in New Mexico, according to the Park Service. That spending supported 1,400 jobs paying $36.9 million in wages and salaries to local workers, and generated $107.7 million worth of economic activity in the state’s economy.
    Nationwide, the NPS estimates visitors to its parks, monuments and historic sites spent an estimated $15.7 billion in the nearby “gateway” communities, supporting 277,000 jobs paying $10.3 billion in wages, salaries and benefits, and producing $29.7 billion in economic activity.
    The lodging sector saw the highest direct contributions with 48,000 jobs and $4.8 billion in local economic activity attributed to the park visitors, while restaurants and bars benefited with 60,000 jobs and $3.2 billion in economic activity.

  • Nepal gives new meaning to bootstrap entrepreneurism

    From the surprising number of tourism-related features, I assumed they had government help.
    In this poor, but well-established Mecca for adventure travelers, the hiking trails were well developed, nicely painted signs directed hikers to the different hotels, English was widely spoken and everybody had business cards.
    But when I asked one young hotelier about help from the government, he laughed and said something like: Are you kidding? The government collects taxes, but does nothing for us.
    This was Nepal in 1998. We were visiting our son in the Peace Corps and meeting our future daughter-in-law, and when in Nepal, you trek.
    As a business editor, I was fascinated by the entrepreneurism I saw. When trekkers first started to show up in the early 1970s, the citizens of remote villages clinging to impossibly steep mountainsides knew an opportunity when they saw one.
    Beginning by making an extra bed in the kitchen for travelers, they had bootstrapped themselves into enlarging a room and then building an addition or tea room. Some eventually created stand-alone hotels.
    It was all done with non-existent resources. One young man admitted to my son that his children were malnourished because he needed to buy building materials to enter the hospitality business. Now that’s sacrifice.

  • Follow the money

    Late last month, the County Council, county staff and members of the public spent about 16 hours examining and approving the county’s 2016 budget.
    I learned some important things about the process that I’d like to share with you. Please remember, these are my views as an individual councilor and they don’t necessarily reflect the views of the other councilors.
    First, I want to compliment the talented and dedicated professionals on the county staff. They’ve significantly cut operating expenses over the past five years to address a 29 percent decline in the Gross Receipts Tax revenues that the county relies on for most of its funding; and they’ve done a great job of minimizing the impact to citizen services in managing those cuts.
    They’ve achieved this by decreasing county staff by over 20 positions through attrition since 2014 and by cutting other operating costs and delaying projects. The staff’s dedication to meeting the service needs of our community is noteworthy.
    When I was running for the council, I campaigned with a goal of improving the alignment between strategic goals, citizen needs and resource allocation.

  • A staffer's view of the Legislative session

    I served many of my eight years on County Council as a member of its state legislative committee. In that role, I frequently visited with elected legislators in both House and Senate, lobbyists, and staff.
    It was a close-up view of the legislature from the “outside.” This year, I had the opportunity to view the legislature from the “inside” as a staff member, an analyst for the House Regulatory and Public Affairs Committee (HRPAC).
    It was illuminating, although there were few surprises.
    The basic job of legislative analysts is to study bills and provide a synopsis, the “CliffsNotes” version, to legislators.
    We look at intent and actual effects, issues raised, costs (in the broad sense, not just dollars), conflicts with existing statutes, technical issues, etc.
    HRPAC was a great assignment.
    The wide range of legislation referred to it included major bills on minimum wage, state lottery, taxes and abortion issues to not-so-major ones (all important to someone) on, for example, barber licensing and special license plates.
    Many were in between, updating laws on lobbyists, various types of medical professionals, telephone service charges, alcohol sales, sex offenders, hunting and fishing licenses, etc., etc.

  • State Dem Chairperson bashes silly editorial

    “Do you know Debra Haaland?”
    That question was put to me recently by a neighbor when our paths crossed while walking our dogs in a nearby park.
    “We’ve never met,” I said, “even though she was the Democratic nominee for lieutenant governor last year and she’s now the chairwoman of the state Democratic Party.”
    “Did you see her letter to the editor the other day?” my neighbor continued.
    “Her letter,” as my neighbor put it, was actually an op-ed in the Albuquerque Journal wherein Haaland takes that newspaper to task for a rather silly editorial it published criticizing State Auditor Tim Keller and Attorney General Hector Balderas for having used their own personal email accounts to rally fellow Democrats to their party’s causes.
    In other words, the state’s most widely circulated daily (which “has long been rumored to be a right-wing newspaper,” Haaland noted) had nothing better to do with its ink than criticize a couple of politicians for doing what all politicians do, irrespective of party.
    And doing it on their own time and dime, at that.
    My neighbor’s dog is named Greta, I learned, but I know nothing about his politics.

  • The real “mommy wars” are playing out in the workplace

    Take a glance at any contemporary parenting blog, website or social media group and you’ll see the “mommy wars” playing out.
    The battles range from helicopter parenting versus free-range kids to sling versus stroller and cloth versus disposable diaper.
    While the battles (and the guilt that comes with them) are real, they are keeping our attention from the real mommy wars: the abysmal lack of national policies to protect new mothers in the workplace.
    Almost three-quarters of mothers are in the labor force and they are the primary breadwinners in 40 percent of U.S. households. Still, the U.S. is one of the few nations on the globe that does not ensure that new moms have paid maternity leave. In fact, we have no federal policies on paid leave of any kind and our policy on unpaid leave does not protect enough working women.
    This Mother’s Day we need national policies that reflect our nation’s true family values.  
    Every country except the U.S., Suriname and Papua New Guinea provides paid maternity leave according to the World Policy Forum. Even in countries with poor civil rights records, such as Somalia, Iran and North Korea, women get at least some paid maternity leave.
    Women receive 12 weeks in India, 16 weeks in the Netherlands, and almost 70 weeks in Sweden.