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Today's Opinions

  • Luján Grisham offers platitude for the ‘War on Poverty’

    A legislative tradition is a speech by each member of our congressional delegation to a joint gathering of the two houses.
    The exercise is useful. It puts the people self-selected to live on airplanes flying between New Mexico and Washington, D.C., in front of a bipartisan political audience. A chance exists of something useful or revealing.
    From Albuquerque Rep. Michelle Luján Grisham, a Democrat, on Feb. 17 came the charge, “It’s time you declare a war on poverty in New Mexico.”  The comment was in an Albuquerque Journal story.
    The sentiments are noble. Questions arise, however. (I can hear the liberal knives sharpening. Gasp! Question a principle of pious liberalism?)
    It’s not that Luján Grisham is wrong. It would be nice to eliminate poverty. The trouble is that such words are easy to say and tough, if not impossible, to execute. This would be a state level war, I suppose.
    To talk of solving a social problem such as poverty, Washington Post economics columnist Robert Samuelson once observed, is itself a problem. “‘Solution’ implies a perfect resolution, but many social problems do not admit to that.” Poverty is one of the “conditions with which we have to struggle, for better or worse.”

  • Letters to the editor 3-3-15

    Guaje signage hard to see

    The directional sign to Guaje Pines Cemetery is so low that it is hard for first visitors to see. In the summer, it is shaded, too.
    Could the sign be lifted for better view?
    Also, a little green and white sign on the other side of Diamond Drive would be helpful.

    Sue Y. Conner
    Los Alamos

    Casino not a place for teens

    Showering after a night at Buffalo Thunder Resort and Casino helps wash away some of the smell of the smoking.
    Gambling is illegal for our high school students. Drinking alcohol is also illegal for them.
    Drinking alcohol helps them make bad decisions.
    Memories from the prom night.

    Anne Brinkley
    Los Alamos
     

  • Plastic bag bans are full of misconceptions

    I’m writing to voice my opposition to the idea of a plastic grocery bag ban that’s been going around lately.
    Bag bans have become the latest Eco-Fad for people that don’t have anything better to do than to punish everyone for the actions of a few. They are just a warm fuzzy feel good idea that’s completely ineffective.
    Most of the time I shop at Smith’s I bring my own cloth bags since they are sturdy, carry more, and I get bonus rewards points for doing so.  However, I don’t keep any cloth bags in my truck for various reasons, so if I’m driving my truck I need the plastic or paper bags available at the store. Today I rode with a friend to Smith’s to get some lunch. I don’t carry my cloth bags in my wallet, so used plastic provided by Smith’s.
    I re-use my grocery bags for many things. I’ve actually run out of bags at the house and had to intentionally leave my cloth bags in the car on the next shopping trip just so that I could obtain more.
    Plastic bags are likely the most re-purposed and reused product that people bring into their home! If there is a bag ban, I’ll just have to buy them from Amazon.

  • The high costs of Boehner

    As these lines are written the bumptious Republican majority that controls the U.S. House seems prepared to shut down the Department of Homeland Security or, perhaps, avoid a shutdown by funding its operations for only three weeks.
    It’s madness. By a large bipartisan margin, the Senate has already sent the House a measure funding the department through September. It is a straight-forward funding bill, no gimmicks, no distractions.
    But wingnuts in the Republican House are demanding a measure that includes language invalidating some of President Barack Obama’s executive orders on immigration reform. Slipping extraneous stuff like that into a bill is called adding a “poison pill,” something calculated to kill a proposal.
    House speakers who are serious about getting things done, especially where national security is concerned, usually knock heads of supporters who foster such nonsense and tell them to cool it. But the current House Speaker, John Boehner, acquiesced and tried to borrow three weeks to avoid an immediate shutdown.
    Boehner has accomplished little as Speaker, but he plainly likes the title.
    His latest caper began last fall when congressional Republicans joined Democrats in sending the president a measure funding the federal government, pending his signature.

  • Save the plastic bag and our rights

    In the last month there have been some very emotionally charged letters to the editor published in various media outlets here in town, by Jody Benson, a member of the Sierra Club, demanding a ban on plastic shopping bags in Los Alamos County.
    Understandably, this topic is going to generate a lot of discussion because it concerns how people choose to shop and live their lives.
    Before we ban plastic bags and allow needleless government intrusion into a private transaction let’s look at some facts regarding plastic shopping bags.
    • Plastic bags are made of No. 2 (high-density polyethelyne, HDPE) or No. 4 (low-density polyethelyne, LDPE), both of which are 100 percent recyclable through the “Bag-2-Bag” program Smith’s participates in.
    • Smith’s also recycles its own cardboard and other waste, thus not impacting the county’s solid waste system.
    • Ninety percent of plastic shopping bags are reused in households. The most common reuse is to line trashcans and to dispose of pet waste.

  • Streamline regulating, too

    Engineers aim to streamline everything to work better, faster and cheaper.
    Over the years, countless techniques for doing this have been launched and proved valuable. More come every year.
    Almost every process works better, faster and cheaper than it did 10 years ago. A dusky exception is the vital process of regulating.
    Regulating has built up a backlog of inefficiencies that have remedies on hand in other fields.
    This is not surprising for a system like regulating that works, not by design, but as shaped by a long chain of votes cast on a tangle of super politicized issues.
    The system of regulating emissions has four main steps: rule-setting, permitting, inspection and enforcement. Each step affects all the other steps and each affects the efficiency of the regulating system as a whole.
    Yet, the steps are designed separately, with barely a glance at the thriving engineering field of systems analysis.
    Systems analysis comes in forms that range from very complex to common-sense simple. Systems analysis in the 21st century can use information theory and game theory to shape high-level math problems run on computers.

  • Pet Talk: Probiotics for pets on the rise

    Probiotics, or “good bacteria,” can be defined as living microorganisms that, when administered in adequateamounts, can offer multiple health benefits to the host. Though they have been gaining popularity amongst humans in the past decade, the possibility of similar probiotic supplements for your pets’ health is on the rise.
    “Essentially, we are trying to give live bacteria in supplement form that have beneficial properties to ananimal in order to improve their digestive health,” said Dr. Jan Suchodolski, clinical associate professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. “It is imperative that bacteria are alive once they reach the gut and that they are also delivered in high amounts. That’s why a high-quality product is needed.”
    In order to fully understand how probiotics work, it’s important to know that the beneficial effects of probiotics are bacterial strain specific, meaning every bacterial strain has a potentially different effect. Some probiotic strains, for instance, stimulate the immune system, while other strains produce anti-inflammatory biomolecules or antimicrobial molecules to combat pathogens.

  • LAPS in compliance with immunization regulations

    There has been a great deal of conversation in the community and the media about immunizations against certain communicable diseases.
    In fact, one recent story (lamonitor.com, Feb. 6) noted Los Alamos County was “… second in the state for the number of vaccination exemptions at 3.1 percent for children ages 4 to 18….”
    For Los Alamos, the number of parents who requested vaccination exemptions (immunization waivers) amounted to about 100 students out of the more than 3,500 enrolled in school. The vaccination exemptions requested by parents were primarily based on religious or medical reasons, which are allowed by state law.
    Our community will be pleased to know Los Alamos Public Schools is in compliance with the New Mexico Department of Health rules and New Mexico School Manual regarding immunizations and exemptions.
    Michele Wright RN, LAPS Nursing Team leader stated, “Either students have completed their vaccines, are following a schedule to catch up on missing vaccines, or have valid religious beliefs or medical conditions for not receiving their vaccines.”