.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • Letter to the editor 3-23-16

    Looking for New Mexico information

    Dear people of the great state of New Mexico:
    Hello! I am a fourth grade student in North Carolina. In fourth grade, we do state reports and I have chosen your state! I am very excited to learn about the great state of New Mexico as I work on my report.
    Most of the information that we get for our reports will be from books and web sites. We also like to get information from people who live in the state, too. This is why I am writing to you. I was hoping that you would be willing to send me some items to help me learn more about the best things in your state. It could be things like postcards, maps, pictures, souvenirs, general information, this newspaper article, or any other items that would be useful. You can mail items to the address below. I really appreciate your help!
    Jimmy Maple
    Mrs. Hughey’s Class
    Charlotte Latin School
    9502 Providence Road
    Charlotte, NC  28277

  • Agriculture is alive and well in New Mexico

    New Mexico ag secretary: Let’s appreciate what farmers, ranchers put on our plates – and into our communities
    Milk, beef, chile, pecans…Cheese, lettuce, spinach, grapes…Alfalfa, cotton, corn, onions and more – what’s not to get excited about as spring approaches? Agriculture is alive and well in New Mexico, and the food and crops mentioned here are just a sample of the diverse culture of production that makes New Mexico special.
    On Tuesday, we celebrated National Agriculture Day across America. In New Mexico, I’m asking you to stretch the occasion out for the full week. Ag Day/Week asks us to recognize the important contributions farmers and ranchers make to our dinner plates and local communities. The food on your plate doesn’t just happen. After many months of care and nurturing by people who truly care about our health and safety, the crops grown become our breakfast, lunch, and dinner (and don’t forget snacks). Additionally, our communities thrive from the stable economic impact of agricultural production, as well as the green space it creates.

  • Partisan, line-item vetoes deliver a confused message

    Last week, the governor’s biases were on display as she released the state’s annual pork bill and communities learned which of their public projects will receive capital outlay dollars.
    In a multitude of line-item vetoes, she came down hard on Navajos, Democrats, courts, and acequia associations.
    The governor chastised legislators in a nine-page message for squandering infrastructure funding and spending on local public works. She said some projects were underfunded or unwanted by local governments, and some spending was for items that will wear out before the bond is paid off. And legislators aren’t always working together, she said.
    No argument there, but she also vetoed any request for $10,000 or less, saying it’s not enough to accomplish anything. That’s pretty arbitrary. Some small projects can cost that amount or less.
    The big problem is that many of her vetoes are inconsistent, or they don’t align with her written message.
    Zuni Pueblo has no backup pump on its main well. Three legislators pooled their capital outlay money to buy and install a pump ($190,000), which was vetoed while dozens of other well projects around the state were approved.

  • 2016-17 school budget will require difficult choices

    BY JIM HALL
    President, Los Alamos School Board

  • Even in best times, Trump’s rump too much to bear

    Having spent a good share (or worst part) of this winter observing largely from my sick bed those events which have thus far shaped the 2016 race for the Republican and Democratic presidential nominations, let me say outright that Trump’s rump is too much to bear.
    But, then, even in the most tranquil of times, Trump’s bum would likely be too much to bear.
    When one is fighting fevers and surgeries, the thought of our fellow citizens nominating a presidential candidate with a derriere more nearly the girth of William Howard Taft’s than anyone to have sought the presidency since 1912 is hardly appealing.
    Are these the same American Republican voters who just four years were mounting the barricades on behalf of a fellow named Mitt Romney?
    Or for the reelection of an incumbent Democratic president bearing the exotic nomenclature, Barack Obama, a young man who had yet to complete a full term as a United States Senator from the hoary state of Illinois?
    The doctors had told me that reducing the fever and removing some squamous cell skin cancers from the top of my head would perk me up nicely and perhaps even cure what ailed me.

  • Putting together a great wedding on a budget

    BY NATHANIEL SILLIN
    Practical Money Skills

  • Regular life is often about information received

    Those of us deeply involved in “consequential matters,” such as politics, the Legislature, the potential $417 million shortage for estimated Medicaid expenses, the non-performance of the state economy, sometimes need reminding that life exists outside the arenas.
    The national political overlay doesn’t help, what with Hillary Clinton’s lies, Bernie Sanders’ delusions, Donald Trump’s destructive offensiveness, the youth of the two senators and John Kasich’s decency.
    A massage therapist in Albuquerque feels doubly pressured. She finds Trump scary and fears the effect on her customers when Albuquerque Mayor Richard Berry’s bus rapid transit fiasco destroys Central Avenue in front of the building where she has been for 17 years.
    A recent Sunday had, as bookends, regular life on Saturday and the governor on Monday.
    For us, regular life meant the sunny and warm Jemez Springs Cabin Fever Festival Feb. 21. Festival vendors included artisans from four pueblos – Acoma, Zia, Jemez and Taos.
    Cars lined the main street. The Bodhi Mandala Zen Center filled its grounds with cars parking at $2 each. Restaurants overflowed with people. After checking the legendary Los Ojos Bar, we ambled a few blocks south for a dandy pastrami sandwich at the Highway 4 Café.

  • Letters to the Editor 3-16-16

    Reopening of roundabout discussion would cause delays, cost money

    I was very disappointed to see at the recent Transportation Board meeting the re-opening of the NM 502 Roundabout discussion. This issue has been going on for a few years and has had a full and complete public input during that time and was considered in public meetings of the full Transportation Board and approved by the full County Council.
    The design approved was done by a major traffic-engineering firm (Ourston Engineering) and has been approved by New Mexico State Highway engineers. This design (in my humble opinion as a citizen and taxpayer) is a big improvement for NM 502 and is now funded with state and county funds. This decision has been already made and with full public input. The reopening of this discussion now is entirely unwarranted and way too much time was allowed in the recent Transportation Board meeting to roundabout opponents in promoting their views.  
    I think I would trust the professional opinions from New Mexico State Traffic professional engineers and the consulting firm, Ourston Engineering, so I have no comments on the design, which is being finalized now by the state highway department.