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Today's Opinions

  • In early days, Bankhead Highway was a first

    “If any town in the United States needs roads worse than us, it has my pity,” a citizen told his county commissioners. “Farmers,” said the local paper, “have been wedged between two sand hills long enough.”
    These were the first rumblings of the Good Roads movement in New Mexico. In 1915, farmers on the East Side threatened to take their produce to markets in Texas, where roads were better, if the Roosevelt County Commission didn’t do something.  
    The next time you get in your car, remind yourself that a century ago the nation’s roads were little more than dirt tracks and trails with no signs or bridges. In New Mexico, land owners fenced across roads, and drifting sand was a bigger hindrance than fences.
    New Mexico joined the national Good Roads movement, which produced a network of highways, such as they were. We know Route 66 best, but a few years earlier and farther south was the Bankhead Highway, one of the first transcontinental highways.
    It began in 1916 with the Bankhead Highway Association, whose namesake, U. S. Sen. John H. Bankhead, of Alabama, was a leader of the Good Roads movement. That year, Congress passed the Federal Aid Road Act of 1916 over the objections of citizens like Henry Ford, who didn’t think roads were a good use of taxpayer money.

  • Song starts path to 206 commissions

    Follow a random path and the journey can get a little strange. This path started with a song, a terrible song, it must be said. I heard the song, “Truth or Consequences,” when I paused my dial flipping at KUNM, the public radio station at the University of New Mexico.
    What I could understand of the lyrics indicated unkind things about Truth or Consequences and about New Mexico. The song seemed to fit our situation.
    By email, I got the name of the song and the artist, Fish Karma of Tucson, aka Terry Owen. The lyrics, in part, say:
    “Well I was on my way to Santa Fe to take a brief vacation.
    “Feeling hungry I pulled in here to get a bite to eat.
    “That was about a month ago and they won’t let me leave.
    “I’m stuck in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico.
    “Ain’t no way out that I could see…
    “…the deepest pit of hell has gotta be better than this.”
    Unfortunately, the song appeared in 1992, just as we began an Intel-driven boom.

  • Letter to the Editor 4-13-16

    Explosive ideas for Roundabout art

    First, dear county councilors, thank you for standing your ground on the new roundabout at Central and Trinity. It showed loyalty to our commuters.  It was the right and thoughtful thing to do.
    Second, this is about a plea – a recommendation – for utilizing the space in the center of the new roundabout.
    The question to be asked is, what do we want people to know about Los Alamos as they enter (or leave) the town?
    The recommendation is this: we want them to know that this town was central to building the weapon which ended WWII and put up the nuclear umbrella which has preserved world peace from then until now.
    And how? By placing in the center of that roundabout some artifact central to the mission of our town. Something(s) which unmistakably points to the great things which have happened here, and which are still happening here, and how important they are to the nation and to the world. It should be big, and inspire the imagination of all who enter this town concerning the greatness of our past and of our future.  Several Cruise missiles would be good! Or a missile launching pad with missiles, etc.

  • Medicare takes aim at diabetes epidemic

    BY BOB MOOS
    Southwest Public Affairs Officer, U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid

  • SCORE offers mentoring, low-cost training

    Considering all the business smarts stored in the brains of seasoned executives, it would be a shame to let it go to waste.
    SCORE gives entrepreneurs the key to that stored knowledge by pairing them with volunteer mentors who have decades of expertise in all aspects of starting and running a business. It also hosts workshops and seminars that teach basic and advanced skills that are crucial for a business owner to have.
    When the nonprofit formed in 1964, its name was an acronym for the Service Corps of Retired Executives, because early mentors were recruited from the ranks of the retired. The organization later shortened its name, as many of its volunteers still hold jobs in a complex and rapidly evolving global economy.
    Thanks to its resource partnership with the U.S. Small Business Administration and its nationwide network of volunteers, SCORE can offer its services at little to no cost.
    SCORE’s wide reach
    Santa Fe is home to one of the state’s most active — and oldest — SCORE chapters. Launched in the mid-1970s, it mentored more than 800 clients last year, and 500 more attended its workshops.

  • When changing jobs, should you leave 401(k) money behind?

    BY Nathaniel Sillin
    Special to the Monitor

  • Programs to cultivate new mindsets is great, when it works

    “The Entrepreneurial Mindset” is the latest great program to land in New Mexico.
    It’s not just for people who want to start businesses. It’s a way of thinking that enables any individual in any job to take personal responsibility for his or her work, applying initiative to the job and committing to be of service to others. It’s based on in-depth studies of hundreds of successful entrepreneurs.
    Through Central New Mexico Community College, the program has been taught to 100 employees of the city of Albuquerque. Mayor Richard Berry has committed to having at least 1,000 employees trained in it. It’s also offered to the public.
    The model was developed by Gary Schoeniger, CEO of the Entrepreneurial Learning Initiative, who was here recently to train the facilitators who will teach the program to their colleagues from the city and other major local employers.
    If it works, hundreds of city employees will develop the entrepreneurial attitudes that let every person become an idea factory for process improvement and better service to the customers and taxpayers.  

  • Revisions show rural areas doing better

    Our rural counties did better last year than we first thought.
    The news is due to the annual revisions called “benchmarking” to the initially reported job numbers.
    Statistics get revised; it’s a rule. Frustration results and becomes anguish in our current situation. We get reports of one number, but no mention that it really is “the number,” plus or minus, depending on the mechanics of the survey. When more and better information becomes available, the number is revised. So it is with job numbers.
    The complication is that the numbers and associated expectations drive policy and business decisions. Change disrupts the decisions.
    The newest revisions, published in mid-March, take our monthly average employment for 2015 down by 3,000 to 825,600. The state’s job performance started decently and eroded during the year. Nine of 2015’s 12 months were revised downward. The numbers come from the U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and the state Department of Workforce Solutions.