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Today's Opinions

  • Free speech isn’t free

    It costs nothing to tell someone that you love them, but FTD would rather you say it with flowers.
    Cadbury wants you say it with chocolate. And Oscar Mayer says, “Yell it with bacon!”
    But shouldn’t speech be free?
    A few years ago, an Oxford student told a mounted police officer, “Excuse me, do you realize your horse is gay?” He was arrested for violating the Public Order Act, which prohibits homophobic remarks.
    A judge with more sense than the officer (whose intelligence bordered on that of a sea slug) threw the arrest out. Free speech outweighed free stupidity.
    Speech may be free, but it often presents itself as a painful reminder of the maxim, “You get what you pay for.”
    Recently, a school district hosted a “Draw Muhammad” art contest, promoting itself as a “Free Speech Exhibit.” Of course, it was in fact specifically designed with one intent in mind — to incite hatred.
    And it succeeded. Two radical Muslims arrived, started shooting, and were quickly killed by the heavily armed Garland, Texas “Kill ‘em all and let God sort ‘em out” SWAT team.
    Was this art contest really free speech? Yeah, it was. Here in America, you have the right to criticize most anyone and most anything.

  • Money management guide for new college graduate

    A young adult’s first months out of college are about personal freedom and finding one’s path as an adult. Building solid money habits is a big part of that.
    Most grads are managing money alone for the first time — finding work, places to live and if they’re in the majority, figuring out how to pay off college loans. For many, these are daunting challenges. If you are a young adult — or know one — here are some of the best routines to adopt from the start:
    Budgeting is the first important step in financial planning because it is difficult to make effective financial decisions without knowing where every dollar is actually going. It’s a three-part exercise — tracking spending, analyzing where that money has gone and finding ways to direct that spending more effectively toward saving, investing and extinguishing debt.
    Even if a new grad is looking for work or waiting to find a job, budgeting is a lifetime process that should start immediately.
    A graduate’s first savings goal should be an emergency fund to cover everyday expenses such as the loss of a job or a major repair. The ultimate purpose of an emergency fund is to avoid additional debt or draining savings or investments. Emergency funds should cover at least four to seven months of living expenses.

  • National park visitors boost state’s economy

    The next time you see an out-of-state plate on the road this summer, you might take a moment to thank the National Park Service.
    According to an NPS study, visitors to New Mexico’s national parks and monuments make an important contribution to our state’s economy.
    In 2014, park visitors spent an estimated $88.8 million in local communities while visiting NPS lands in New Mexico, according to the Park Service. That spending supported 1,400 jobs paying $36.9 million in wages and salaries to local workers, and generated $107.7 million worth of economic activity in the state’s economy.
    Nationwide, the NPS estimates visitors to its parks, monuments and historic sites spent an estimated $15.7 billion in the nearby “gateway” communities, supporting 277,000 jobs paying $10.3 billion in wages, salaries and benefits, and producing $29.7 billion in economic activity.
    The lodging sector saw the highest direct contributions with 48,000 jobs and $4.8 billion in local economic activity attributed to the park visitors, while restaurants and bars benefited with 60,000 jobs and $3.2 billion in economic activity.

  • Thank you: Spring food drive a success

    Your local Boy Scouts and Letter Carriers (NALC-4112) would like to thank the community for their generosity in supporting the LA Cares Food Bank with your donations of food and supplies during last weekend’s Spring Food Drive. We would also like to take this opportunity to thank RE/MAX Realty, Knights of Columbus No. 3137, Smith’s Foods, Los Alamos Monitor, Los Alamos Daily Post, KRSN 1490, TRK Management, Retired and Senior Volunteers, and Los Alamos County for providing a variety of resources that support the food drive.  
    Additional donations of non-perishable food and personal care supplies to LA Cares are accepted year-round at the aquatic center and at Los Alamos County Social Services at 1505 15th Street, Suite A, during regular business hours. Monetary donations can be sent to: LA Cares, P.O. Box 248, Los Alamos, N.M. 87544.
    Thank you for helping to battle hunger in our community and mark your calendar for our next food drive that will be this fall on Nov. 21.
     
    Bill Blumenthal
    Northern New Mexico District – Boy Scouts of America
    Food Drive Coordinator
     Terry Jones
    National Association of
    Letter Carriers – 4112
    Food Drive Coordinator

  • Business tools empower owners to shape their financial future

    Entrepreneurs are naturally passionate about providing a service or product, but many avoid digging into the financial aspects of running a small business — perhaps because they don’t have simple tools that can help them understand their finances.
    This avoidance can cost a business dearly, because financial success requires that the owner understand the target customer, how to price a product or service and how to keep track of cash flowing in and out of the business.
    It all begins with understanding who — if anyone — wants the product or service the business is selling.
    “Businesses can’t take a shotgun approach to marketing,” said Kim Blueher, vice president of lending at WESST — a nonprofit lender and small-business development and training organization with six offices in New Mexico. A marketing strategy needs to be based on “a realistic picture of how many
    people want their product.”
    At WESST, Kim and Amy Lahti teach business clients how to identify that customer. They also introduce clients to simple spreadsheets that help them compute how many products or services the business needs to sell to cover expenses and make a profit.

  • Letters to the editor 5-19-15

    Thanks to community for Nepal fundraiser
     
    On behalf of whole team that organized the fundraiser musical program who helped the victims of the Nepal earthquake, I would like to thank Los Alamos community for their enthusiasm, presence in large numbers.
    Thanks to all singers and dance groups for their superb show. Thanks to the Los Alamos Monitor, LA Daily Post and LA Postdoc association for their publicity.  Thanks to Trinity on the Hill Episcopal church for giving Kelly Hall for free. Thanks to each one of you for your generous support and in one hour, we had collected a $2,217 fund. For those who haven’t donated, look for these people and give your contribution personally.  
    Satyesh Kumar Yadav (facebook.com/satyeshyadav, syadav@lanl.gov)
    Arul Kumar (facebook.com/marulmd04, marulkr@lanl.gov)
    Akhilesh Sing (akhilesh@lanl.gov)
    pratik Dholabhai  (pdholabhai@lanl.gov)
    Ramesh Jha (facebook.com/rjha.unc, rjha@lanl.gov)
    Sachi Krishnamurthy (facebook.com/sachi.krishnamurthy, sachi@lanl.gov)
    Krishna Acharya (kacharya@lanl.gov)
    Nimai Mishra (facebook.com/nimai.mishra.7, Nimai@lanl.gov)
    Nirmal Ghirimie (nghimire@lanl.gov)
    Sanket Navale (facebook.com/sanketnavale, sanket@lanl.gov)
    Tilak Dhakal (tdhakal@lanl.gov)
     

  • Letters to the editor 5-17-15

    Branding needs
    success measurements

    I found Councilor Kristin Henderson’s recent column on branding very much unconvincing, largely because (a) no objectives were explicitly stated for “branding” and (b) no measures of success were proffered.
    Henderson lists several “successful” branding stories, but frankly I had never heard of any of them. The fact that I never heard of such isn’t terribly important, but what is important is that no measure of just how such efforts were judged successful was offered.
    Without such, there is simply no way to evaluate her statements.
     Let’s assume for the moment that the examples Henderson listed are in fact, somehow, successes. Many communities have attempted to brand themselves. How many such efforts have failed?
    Listing only successes seems to me rather like asking a gambler how he or she is doing. Such folks almost always recall their wins, but somehow forget to mention their losses, which are more often than not larger than their wins.
    Surely many recall the monies spent by the City of Albuquerque under the Martin Chavez regime, where much effort (and funds) was spent to brand the city as “Q.” The “Q” effort failed miserably and has been utterly abandoned.

  • Letters to the editor 5-15-15

    Unclear on column health care view

    Merilee Dannemann makes a number of good points in her column on health care, especially that much risk seems to have been transferred to medical practices, but:
    1. While there are always bad apples, my personal experience convinces me that a significant majority of doctors seek to avoid errors and unnecessary procedures because that is good medical care. They do not need a changed incentive of saving money. To suggest otherwise is an uncalled-for insult.
    2. The column is unclear about costs: Average cost per ‘patient’ is about $6,000, while average premium is about $1,500. However, the latter is per subscriber. As long as there are more than four subscribers for every patient, the scheme pays for itself and even provides a profit for the insurer. Does she mean to say that every subscriber is also a patient? Most people are healthy most of the time.
    Terry Goldman
    Los Alamos

    Controlled by the council?

    Around the world, we are fighting an enemy that kills people who disagree with them — sometimes by beheading. They mutilate young girls under the guise of “female circumcision.”