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Today's Opinions

  • Don’t mind your own business – they’re all our kids

    Here we are back in a sad, familiar place. We’ve lost another child to a brutal, unthinkable murder. Her face has been inside our heads since it first appeared in the newspaper, just like all the other faces of little ones lost to vile criminal acts.
    After the flowers, balloons and stuffed animals, come the hearings and task forces and inquiries and ordinances and laws and speeches.
    And then we turn to other matters until the next time, which comes too soon.
    But maybe this time we can begin the change, which starts with the truth, heard in frank testimony recently before Albuquerque city councilors and Bernalillo County commissioners.
    Sgt. Amy Dudewicz, who works in the Sheriff’s Office special victims unit, said they get more child-abuse and neglect calls than they can respond to. Two UNM pediatricians said that for every child who makes the news, hundreds more are hurt. Albuquerque police have just three child-abuse liaisons reviewing more than 900 cases a month.
    And this is in our largest city. Imagine the situation in rural areas.
    Two politicians made sense.
    U. S. Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham observed that we have many programs to address successive family crises.

  • State revenues collapse, fix requires compromise

    The day my newspaper brought a front page report about state government’s ugly financial situation, an insert offered a small-scale government extravagance, a 32-page full-color, tabloid touting the wonders of the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish. The insert, an issue of the department’s “New Mexico Wildlife” publication placed in newspapers statewide, sported additional elements that increased the cost.
    The cover was a photograph of a hummingbird.  
    Outside the budget mess but contributing to the overall national sense of New Mexico lies the killing of 10-year-old Victoria Martens in Albuquerque. Her memorial service provided the CNN.com headline the afternoon of Aug. 28.
    Some context is needed before moving to specifics during the next week or two.
    Solvency is back as the principal focus of state government, as in, how will the state decide to be able to pay its bills? This isn’t the usual meaning of solvency, which is the question of whether the organization can pay its bills. The state will rebalance the budget. The constitution requires it.

  • Letters to the Editor 9-7-16

    Iran nuclear agreement is excellent

    An article or letter appeared in the Aug. 22 Monitor entitled ‘For critics of the Iran nuclear deal...’ I wish to comment.
    I worked at IAEA headquarters in Vienna 1998-2003. I also worked with the Safeguards Department of the IAEA for over 33 years from LANL. My field was nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. In addition to helping develop nuclear material measurement systems, I helped set up a measurement-training program for their safeguards inspectors. This has been part of every inspector’s initial training since 1979. I retired in 2007, but the program continues and has grown substantially. It was even featured in a six- to seven-minute Morning Edition article on NPR-KUNM several months ago. Ambassadors, senators, and representatives now come to LANL to learn about IAEA safeguards and the Treaty on Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). This includes all the inspectors who go to Iran. I know many of these folk and have participated in their training at LANL and the IAEA.
    I’ve read the NPT many times and helped facility and governmental personnel in many countries to develop and write the various required documents after signing the NPT. LANL also ran a course in cooperation with the IAEA and U.S. State Department in IAEA-NPT safeguards from 1990 to 2006.

  • Relationship helps in journey to start business

    Relationship figures big in six-year journey to start pet-care business
    By Finance New Mexico
    By the time they had adopted seven dogs from friends and neighbors, David and Juliana Garcia concluded that Las Cruces sorely needed a business that served animals and the people who love them.
    The couple bought a van with their savings to start a mobile grooming business for large pets. By the time they were ready to buy a second van to accommodate their growing client base, the Garcias were thinking about opening a hotel and day camp, with spa services on the side, for dogs and cats.
    In the challenging years between conception and creation of Pet Planet (http://www.petplanetcomplex.com) in 2014 — years that coincided with the deepest recession in nearly a century — the young entrepreneurs drew on their passion for animals and their financial partnership with The Loan Fund to sustain them.
    Timing is everything
    In 2008, the Garcias purchased the land on which they planned to build Pet Planet and lined up a construction loan through a traditional lender. Then the real-estate market crashed, and the bank withdrew its loan offer

  • Politicking enlists hocus-pocus

    “Hocus-pocus,” that stylish tool that pretends to do magic, also fits what the party we spurn tries to sell in election speeches. The comparison is not by chance. Politicking and sleight of hand have much in common.
    These words can be read as a cheap insult, yet their meaning is very real. Serious books these days explore the neuroscience behind magic tricks and find close ties to the ways in which illusions persuade people.
    The techniques work the same way in our brains whether the goal is to amuse with magic or to sell, persuade or gain votes. Brains work how they work.  
    In broad terms, magic methods work by distracting the viewers’ attention from the crucial spots at key times. The magic term is “sleight of hand.” When selling or politicking, the more refined term is “sleight of mind,” with the same meaning.
    The fun of magic is that we know what we see is impossible, whether we can spot the trick in it or not. The harm of politicking is we half-believe the impossible, because our minds do not work to spot the tricks.

  • Storm clouds are on the horizon

    BY DR. GARY WELTON
    Visions and Values

  • Animal hoarders inflict misery on pets they claim to love

    We may think of animal hoarders as wacky people like the Cat Lady with six felines. But in New Mexico, police have entered dwellings with upwards of 50 cats and dogs. An Otero County man had 208 dogs.
    The scene is uncomfortably familiar: Dozens of sick or starving animals with no food or water, a “home” with floors covered in filth, stacked cages of animals, and scattered carcasses.
    Local authorities pick up the animals and haul them to the local shelter, where many must be euthanized; others may be rehabilitated and adopted.
    Invariably, the owner of the horror show claims to be an animal lover who rescues unwanted pets. The man with 208 dogs started out as Mission Desert Hills Sanctuary for Dogs, and descended into animal hoarding.
    It’s a nationwide problem – so much so that it even has its own organizations and websites. One is the Hoarding of Animals Research Consortium (HARC) at Tufts University, which spent 10 years studying the problem. They learned that anybody can be a hoarder.
    Veterinarian Debra Clopton, of Edgewood, insisted she loved her 49 dogs; last week, a jury convicted her of 22 counts of animal cruelty in Santa Fe District Court. Clopton testified that her doublewide trailer was a place for dogs with nowhere else to go. She said she was treating them successfully.

  • Thank you for your support in the past

    BY KRISTIN HENDERSON
    Los Alamos County Councilor, Guest Columnist