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Today's Opinions

  • Medicare hospice benefit helps terminally ill patients, families

    Choosing hospice care isn’t about giving up. It’s about making every day count.
    Terminally ill people who make the choice receive care for their physical, emotional, social and spiritual needs. They’re no longer seeking a cure, but they do want to live out their last weeks and months as comfortably as possible and with dignity.
    Unfortunately, many people with Medicare aren’t aware of the hospice benefit.
    Hospice programs follow a team approach. The specially trained team typically includes doctors, nurses, counselors and social workers, among others. A doctor and nurse are on call 24-7 to care for you and support your family when you need it.
    The hospice benefit allows you and your family to stay together in the comfort of your home, unless you require hospital care. If your hospice team determines you need inpatient care at some point, it will make the arrangements for your stay.
    Hospice’s main goal is to relieve your pain and manage your symptoms. As long as the care comes from a Medicare-approved hospice, Medicare covers the physician services, nursing care, drugs, medical equipment and supplies, and physical and occupational therapy.

  • What does N.M. want from an electric power company?

    The debate over PNM’s proposed long-term plan is raising questions that go beyond the plan itself, if New Mexicans are willing to engage in that discussion.
    Though most of the state is served by electric co-ops, PNM’s economic and environmental influence reaches well beyond its service boundaries.
    The Public Regulation Commission must make a decision with far-reaching consequences. Environmental concerns — including the health of New Mexico children — appear to clash with economic objectives, which also affect New Mexico citizens.
    But maybe the clash of objectives is not real. The argument may be broader.
    Three PRC commissioners recently spent more than two hours at a session devoted entirely to public comment about the PNM plan. Under the plan, two of the coal-fired units at the San Juan Generating Station will be shut down.
    The controversy is over what replaces the power from those units. Will it be a mix of coal, nuclear, renewable and natural gas — a plan already agreed to by federal and other state regulators — or, as some New Mexicans demand, will it be changed to scrap the coal and nuclear and rely much more on solar and wind?

  • Reasons to ban single-use carryout plastic bags

    The United States used more than 100 billion plastic bags in 2009.
    Significant resources are used to create these bags — oil or natural gas are used as the feedstock. And considerable energy is used transporting them to the stores where they are dispensed. The very idea of using scarce and expensive resources on an item intended to be used once, for a few hours, and then thrown away is the antithesis of sustainability.
    These bags are intended to be used once to carry groceries or other purchases to the car, then to the house and then be discarded.
    Many opponents of a bag ban say they make additional use of the bags before disposal. I have no doubt this is true for those people, but the statistics show that most bags are not reused. And even if they are reused, they still go into the trash, where they eventually end up in the ocean, scattered over our landscape, or in a landfill where they do not decompose for hundreds of years, and remain a problem if they ever make their way back to the surface.
    It should also be noted that there are biodegradable products available for all of the uses to which these bags are reused by some. They have to be paid for, but that cost reflects the fact that they are not hard on the environment.

  • Highway finance still is the elephant in the room

    No additional money will appear during the next year or so for construction and maintenance of New Mexico’s roads and highways, barring a special session of the Legislature, an event that Gov. Susana Martinez said March 30 was highly unlikely.
    More money was in the deal that wasn’t a deal at the end of the recent legislative session. The opinions about sources of money were strongly held. No compromise wandered into the negotiations, and so nothing happened.
    The administration and the Legislature again kicked the proverbial can down the, ummm, road.
    The administration wanted to move motor vehicle excise tax revenue (around $144 million, this budget year) back into the road fund from the general fund, which would punch an equal hole in the general fund.
    The road fund, source of construction and maintenance money, is different from the general fund, which is allocated by the budget.
    The administration also figures it is OK to borrow against severance tax revenue, something legislators oppose partly because road construction money was borrowed under the Gary Johnson administration and the payments still eat a nasty piece of the money that is available for roads.
    The Democrats proposed raising the gasoline tax, a move the governor opposes. Nyahh, so there, they said to one another, and the session ended.

  • Abolish the income tax and IRS

    For some time now we’ve lived with the scourge of civil asset forfeiture, under which the police can seize a person’s property on the mere suspicion it was used in a crime and without having to charge the owner with an offense. Since the authorities have no burden to prove guilt beyond a reasonable doubt, the burden of proving innocence falls on the hapless citizen who wishes to recover his property.
    Amazingly, people describe as free a society that features this outrage.
    Now it comes to light that the Internal Revenue Service does something similar. The New York Times reports that the IRS seizes bank accounts of people whose only offense is routinely to make deposits of less than $10,000. If you do this enough times, the IRS may suspect you are trying to avoid the requirement that deposits of $10,000 or more be reported by the bank. The IRS keeps the money, but the depositors need not be charged with a crime.
    You read that right. The government demands notification whenever a bank customer deposits $10,000 or more. If you are merely suspected of avoiding that requirement, it can cost you big time.
    Welcome to the land of the free.

  • letter to the editor 4-5-15

    Solar energy shines for all New Mexicans

    You might wonder who is benefitting from solar PV being installed on homes, businesses, schools and cities in New Mexico? Is it wealthy individuals with lots of spare cash or average New Mexicans?
    Recent studies show that working class New Mexicans benefit in two significant ways — job creation and reduced energy costs.
    Consider that the solar industry added jobs nearly 20 times faster than the national average in 2014.
    Right now, 1,600 New Mexicans make their living in the solar industry. By contrast, the state’s largest utility, PNM, employs 2,100 people. Employment in the solar field has increased 86 percent in the past five years.
    The solar boom in New Mexico is creating good jobs for working class Americans during the worst economic downturn in modern times.
    These are livable wages. Solar installers make an average of $20 to $24 per hour, solar project managers make $50,000-$70,000 and designers $40,000-$70,000.
    Along with these positions, there are also warehouse people, sales people, marketing people, administrative staff and managers — creating a range of opportunities for New Mexicans. Solar jobs are generally more accessible to minorities and to those without advanced degrees.

  • Beware of mutant slogans

    Slogans are framed with a mock aura of coherence. By their style, slogans leave out more truth than they include.
    As a slogan is heard more, its inconsistencies get easier to spot. For example, a variety of well-known slogans show up at every debate over the best type of regulation — federal, state or local.
    The case of fracking is typical. Suppose we hear a proposal to pass regulations at the federal level. We soon hear an industry slogan decrying the folly of regulations designed with the idea that “one-size-fits-all.”
    Surely, the best regulations are tailored to fit the conditions on the ground in each state, so the story goes. It’s only natural.
    Thus begins the long road to setting different regulations for fracking in different states. The work will be greatly slowed by concerns that business will flee states that first adopt rules or adopt strong rules. Eventually, regulations will spread to nearly all states, but the rules will vary widely, depending on who was in charge when a state’s rules were passed. Rules will vary from very detailed to very simple.

  • What did my parents ever do to the Federal Reserve?

    In September 1993, President Bill Clinton reassured his radio audience that “if you work hard and play by the rules, you’ll be rewarded with a good life for yourself and a better chance for your children.”
    Picking up that theme over 18 years later, President Barack Obama affirmed that “Americans who work hard and play by the rules every day deserve a government and a financial system that does the same.” The trouble is neither the government nor the financial system backed by the Federal Reserve rewards people like my parents, who have worked hard and played by the rules their entire lives, only to have their savings wither away.