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Today's Opinions

  • Atomic City Transit, Dial-a-Ride prevented injury

    I would like to express my great appreciation for the excellence and professionalism of the drivers and staff of the Los Alamos Atomic City Transit and Dial-a-Ride. I was a passenger on an early morning Dial-a-Ride trip from White Rock to the Transit Center on Oct. 1 when an accident occurred on State Road 4, just outside White Rock.
    The extremely rapid reaction of the driver, Cliff, prevented a head-on collision that would have led to a much worse outcome for everyone involved. The driver then assisted the two passengers in quickly and safely exiting the bus through the emergency exit. His quick actions, plus the practice of seat belt use by Dial-a-Ride passengers prevented an injury to the bus passengers.
    After the accident, the dispatcher, Annette and the ACT manager provided all needed assistance with communication and transportation for the passenger.
    I also want to thank the Los Alamos police, fire, emergency medical and county services for an prompt and effective response. The first police vehicle was on the scene a minute after the event. The fire truck and the ambulance arrived immediately thereafter. They provided all necessary assistance. The county then cleared and cleaned the site and traffic was reopened as quickly as possible under the circumstances.

  • Reclamation award shows range of ways to heal land

    Ernie Casias stood beside a clear cylinder that was tumbling sand mixed with foam. Not just any foam – engineered foam. “It’s like mixing shaving cream and sand,” he explained.
    Engineered foam and cellular concrete are just two materials used in reclamation of abandoned mines and other disturbed lands.
    Exhibitors at the annual conference of the National Association of Abandoned Mine Lands Programs, meeting last week in Santa Fe, displayed such a range of expertise and products, I wished everyone could see it because it might change the conversation about development of all kinds.
    Images of the leaking Gold King mine and other eyesores come readily to mind, but most people don’t realize how sophisticated environmental science has become. Regulations play a role, but it’s become an arena for entrepreneurs with new ideas for reclaiming a construction site, a tailings pile or a drill pad.
    Casias represents ConDeck Corp. of Albuquerque, which uses a process developed by Aerix Industries, of Colorado, to make lightweight “cellular concrete.” Imagine mixing ugly mine tailings with foamy concrete and pumping the stuff back in a mine as fill or support.

  • Cybersecurity, video analytics deals among LANL moves

    Technologies wander from our national laboratories and become companies employing people. But in the view of David Pesiri and his bosses at Los Alamos National Laboratories, far too few have wandered from the laboratory and, of those, far too many have escaped New Mexico.
    One wanderer, Decision Sciences International Corp. of Poway, Calif., near San Diego, was briefly mentioned by The Economist in an article headlined, “The Nuke Detectives.” The firm’s “revolutionary and disruptive technology, originally invented” by LANL physicists, scans for contraband including nuclear threats.  
    David Pesiri is changing things. Pesiri, a chemist with 21 publications under his belt, leads LANL’s Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation.
    “As a model, ‘technology transfer’ is dead,” Pesiri told the New Mexico Industrial Development Executives Association at IDEA’s September meeting in Los Alamos. The old passive sounding model had something to do with LANL getting patents and posting notices about the patents.
    Last year Pesiri wrote about the new way for Innovation magazine.

  • Bernie Sanders’ appeal has America puzzled

    BY MARVIN FOLKERTSMA
    Center for Visions and Values

  • Talk of carnivals and clowns

    Pity the folks whose jobs require them to make sense of lunacy. The media in all their forms are overrun with it, and it is pulverizing that which passes for political discourse today.
    As last week came to a close, the Republican U.S. House Speaker John Boehner and his hard-right GOP cohorts in Congress were threatening another of their federal government shutdowns if funding for Planned Parenthood is not stripped from a stop-gap budget bill that had to be passed if a shutdown was to be avoided come Oct. 1.
    It was chaos, with widespread talk among House Republicans that Boehner’s hold on the speakership itself was hanging in the balance if the far-righters in his caucus didn’t get their way on this one.
    So Boehner just up and resigned.   
    The situation became so worrisome that New Mexico Democratic Congresswoman Michelle Lujan Grisham dispatched a communique to her constituents reminding them that “80 percent of the women who rely on Planned Parenthood are low-income.”
    “We should be working to protect the most vulnerable amongst us, not taking away their health care,” she added.

  • Letter to the editor 10-4-15

    30th-Annual Heart Council Health Fair a success

    The 30th-annual Los Alamos Heart Council Health Fair, held at Griffith Gymnasium on Sept. 26 was a tremendous success! We had over 2,000 attendees. There were more than 70 exhibitors representing a wide range of health-related organizations from Los Alamos and surrounding communities. A total of some 800 flu shots were given and hundreds of blood draws were done, as well as many other health screenings. With this year’s emphasis on children and families, hundreds more parents and children attended than ever before. More than 150 free bike helmets were given out at the fair and, in a new program, an additional 60 helmets will be given directly to elementary and pre-schools in Los Alamos. Hundreds of free children’s backpacks we given out, as well.

  • Memorizing lessons isn’t rigor – it’s rigor mortis

    Like any professional discipline, the academic arena is littered with educational jargon.
     Today, an effective teacher must exemplify intersegmental critical-thinking, recontextualize synergistic concept-maps, and benchmark technology-infused pedogogical schemas.
     Personally, I don’t mind jargon. but there is one word that seems to be more abused than any other.  Rigor.
     Educational rigor involves the creation of a focused coherent learning environment that fosters critical thinking, encourages mastery of the material, and challenges students to help them build a sense of accomplishment.
     In short, rigor raises the bar, preparing students for moving on to more advanced topics and applications.
     There is little applicable training to guide teachers how to establish and nurture rigor in the classroom. Consequently, teachers strongly disagree regarding what constitutes “rigor.”
     In math classes, “rigor” is often tossed like a didactic grenade, purposely confusing students with needlessly difficult problems. Teachers expect students to memorize long lists of complex formulas and to work out problems with large or complicated looking numbers.

  • The Pope, climate change and VW

    BY MARITA NOON
    Executive Director, Energy Makes America Great, Inc.