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Today's Opinions

  • Assets in Action: School is over, you are on your way!

    If you are reading this late Wednesday afternoon, you are done! Oh sure, I mean most of the kids are done with school, but in many – and I say many – ways, we as the parents are also done.
    If you are also the parent of a high school student, I’m sorry, there’s still one more day ahead for you. Oh sure, you will hear about it entirely tonight and again in the morning until they get on the bus or drive to school for the last time this year.
    If you need a comeback, hey that snow day – as late as it was – was glorious! It was ridiculous if you lived in White Rock, but no less glorious to stay in our pajamas that morning.
    Oh and OK if you are married to someone that works in a school, you will get a repeat of what happened on Thursday again on Friday.
    This day and age, we often hear how kids today don’t appreciate the people that give us the freedoms we appreciate today.
    I would like to say that as we approach the last few days of school, local teenagers are still working at letting our service men and women know they are appreciated throughout the year.
    So while many will spend the weekend enjoying parties and an extra day off, take the time to give thanks to those that gave their lives in honor of our country and also appreciate those that serve today.

  • How do we save our smallest towns?

    BY BOB HAGAN
    Coffee on a Cold Morning

  • (Lack Of) excellence seen in nuke museum

    Mediocrity is on full display at the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History in Albuquerque. I assume that the mediocrity, an aggregation of little things, wasn’t there on purpose. But it was there.
    Lured by well executed publicity, I went to see the underwhelming (small and crowded) exhibit, “America’s Road: The Journey of Route 66,” that opened May 14. My idea was to consider New Mexico as a road, no particular beginning or end, nothing specific happening except magnificent sunsets to inspire political rhetoric and cultural impressions on the horizon.
    First, let’s be certain; the museum (nuclearmuseum.org) is well worth seeing for the history of the Manhattan Project and of the atomic bomb. It is on Eubank Blvd., a few minutes south of I-40.
    In the Route 66 exhibit this sentence grabbed. “Route 66 became an icon for travel in the 1950s.” I think that means Route 66 became a symbol for travel, similar to a religious icon in church. The signs describing Route 66 items were loosely mounted and just enough askew that I noticed.

  • PNM investments drive economic development

    BY AGNES NOONAN
    President, WESST

  • Comparing cities’ appeal for ‘successful aging’

    As the oldest Baby Boomers turn 70, there is an opportunity to compare among cities the factors in successful aging. Disclosure: The Baby Boomer group includes me.
    The analysis comes from the Milken Institute (milkeninstitute.org) of California.
    While Milken talks of aging, boomers in the audience need to admit something obvious and un-boomerlike; 70 is old. So is 68, which is Hillary Clinton’s age. Donald Trump is 69. This old-people-for-president bit is the weirdest part of this very weird presidential year. But I digress.
    Milken provides two lists, one ranking large cities, one ranking small cities. The title is “Best Cities for Successful Aging.”
    Of the 100 large cities, Albuquerque places 67th. Among the 252 small cities, Santa Fe is 76th; Las Cruces, 140th; and Farmington, 169th.
    Cold places rank highest for aging. Madison, Wisconsin, is best large city. Iowa City, Iowa, 177 miles away, leads the small. Both are state-university cities, home to, respectively, the University of Wisconsin and University of Iowa. Both are in the Big Ten. All coincidental, I presume. Weather gets the biggest weight among the general factors. Other than drinking, weather is Madison’s worst rank. Madison and Iowa City must do well on other factors.

  • Better ways to ‘pull together’ for our kids

    BY VERONICA C. GARCIA
    Executive Director, New Mexico Voices for Children

  • Decision making on public lands needs to be close to users

    BY BOB HAGAN
    Special to the Monitor

  • Regulatory insight from Colorado, New Mexico

    CHICAGO—Be careful who you talk to in bars. That’s one lesson from a conversation in the elegant bar at the Palmer House hotel in downtown Chicago.
    We talked to a manager from a large nationwide financial institution. This man is a market supervisor (or something like that) for New Mexico, El Paso and Oklahoma. Our discussion considered the differences between Arizona and New Mexico. It included the usual banking structure differences from 30 years ago, but also got to factors including resorts such as the Arizona Biltmore and Camelback and professional golf, which decades ago put a national focus on Arizona.
    The understanding from the conversation is that this manager and, by extension, his very, very large financial institution employer, is mystified by the New Mexico economy.
    The Chicago chat is just one happening from our recent two-week road trip through the Midwest.
    Driving northeast through Colorado on I-76, we came across the welcome center in Julesburg. The men’s restroom was closed. In its place were seven porta-potties.