• Water rates hike questioned

    In the May 26 edition of the Los Alamos Monitor, a front page story told us about how Los Alamos County Department of Public Utilities wants to raise our water rates by 6 percent.
    I guess they need more money. But they are willing to spend $40 million to rebuild Trinity Drive.
    Recently I have seen several stories in the Los Alamos Monitor about how the schools and other local organizations do not have enough money for their budgets.
    It seems to me that the $40 million could be used in better ways.
    Melvin Prueitt
    Los Alamos

  • Troubled by Family Council's dilemma

    We were pleased to note the thorough and thought provoking story you published in the Los Alamos Monitor May 5, but we are troubled to be so informed of a major difficulty facing Los Alamos Family Council.  
    We are proud of the community services offered by LAFC for nearly 50 years, consisting primarily of counseling and youth programs. We cannot imagine the detriment to our community if LAFC closed its doors.    
    Youth Activity Centers in Los Alamos as well as in White Rock for  grades 3 -8 would be absent, as would be the counseling offered for low income families, remediation for alcohol and substance abuse,  family relationships, mental health, crisis line and other areas of  concern.

  • Kudos to PEEC for all the help

    We would like to thank the Pajarito Environmental Education Center for providing a platform and a set of amazing volunteers for the Art Swap last weekend.  
    PEEC helped the community recycle tables and trunks full of art supplies, and gave new inspiration to everyone who came through the doors.   
    Special thanks to all who set up tables as well.  
    What a difference you’ve  made!

    Karen Wray’s Fine Art Gallery
    Village Arts


  • LANL should temper shockwaves to avoid damaging residences

    I read, with surprise, the May 10 Los Alamos Monitor story “Detonation permit meeting has fireworks” in which Los Alamos National Laboratory representatives expressed their concern about “noise” from test explosions on White Rock residents.
    I think the most important point has been missed. A distant siren and subsequent explosion may get my attention, but the “shock wave” from these explosions is what I really worry about. I believe test explosions conducted by the laboratory should have adequate insight and controls to limit shock waves so that they will not create stress cracks in drywall, footings and stem walls, rattle windows, cause pictures on the walls to fall or tilt, or cause other damage to our homes.

  • Concern over dogs’ behavior

    I just read David Jones’ letter about the attack on him and his dogs and I am very sorry this happened to him.
    To the owner of those dogs, and any others who allow such behavior, please take note.
    Los Alamos County has very generously permitted dog owners to enjoy walking their dogs without the encumbrance of a leash, in designated areas, under voice and sight control.
    “Voice and sight control means the keeper has the ability to control the dog by voice command and the dog must respond immediately to that command.
    Further, the dog must remain within sight of the keeper. Even in designated voice and sight control areas in Los Alamos, the dog must be on a leash unless it meets the requirements of voice and sight control.”

  • Roundabout testimonial

    To the Los Alamos County Council and the Transportation Board:
    I drove through this roundabout on Central Avenue at 8th Street in Albuquerque during rush hour at 5:15 p.m., on a weekday last month, while pulling a large trailer with my large pickup:

    I came in from the west and headed east on Central Avenue. My observations include:
    •Central narrows from four lanes to two lanes. That was no problem (good signage) even though heavy traffic had to merge and I was driving a 35-40 foot rig.
    •Traffic was “queued” back about 10 vehicles, but kept moving at about 10 mph.

  • Roundabouts with left turns best bet

    What kind of community do Los Alamos and White Rock want to be? I have not  found many other places I’d live as I contemplate, with an eye on  retirement, whether to stay in Los Alamos or move on.
    Community  sustainability and a people friendly environment are major factors to weigh.
    Some say roundabouts increase local businesses. While that is true, one of  the downsides of Los Alamos County is the lack of businesses along the  roundabout route.
    Is this county business unfriendly? In comparison to  alternative communities, I’d have to conclude that Los Alamos needs to  rethink its lack of support of entrepreneurship and the road blocks to  business we’ve created.

  • Owners need to keep control of their dogs

    A few days ago, I took my two dogs (a little Papillion and a yellow Lab) on their daily walk near the golf course. My dogs are always on a leash anytime they’re out of our fenced yard.
    As we neared the golf course, we heard coyotes, so I was on guard to deal with them if necessary.
    What I next saw was a lady and her three dogs (two German Shepherd mixes and a Lab) headed our way. Her dogs were running free, with no sign of a leash.
    I moved off the trail and picked my Papillion up. As they neared, one of the Shepherds spotted us and started running toward us. I yelled at the lady to control her dogs, to no avail.

  • Thanks for the scoop

    I would like to thank Dan’s Cafe for the 2,000 scoops of ice cream they gave away on Tuesday evening. You are very generous. My family looks forward to the free scoop night every year. It is a good opportunity to see friends and of course, have a lot a of ice cream. I myself contributed two scoops to that number of 2,000.
    The pinwheels were really nice and added to the fun. I liked to stick mine in my scoop of ice cream.
    Thank you so much. We look forward to seeing you throughout the year and again at free scoop night next year.

    Faith Koh
    Los Alamos

  • Better use of money than on Trinity Drive?

    There have been many well-considered letters supporting and opposing changes in Trinity from a four-lane road to two lanes with roundabouts.
    The benefits of the proposed change are and will remain uncertain. The cost is sure to be enormous. What is the projected cost and who would be paying? The inconvenience to motorists during months (or years) of reconstruction is also to be considered. Is it worth it?
    Safety for pedestrians crossing Trinity is a valid concern, but one which could be addressed with a more modest project.

    Janet Tallman
    Los Alamos