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Letters

  • Lots of kudos go to KRSN

    I don’t listen much to KRSN. But when I need them, like the recent Las Conchas evacuation, they’re always there at A.M. 1490. They did a clearly spectacular job over the period of the fire in keeping us all informed and connected.
    Things have changed since I last listened to KRSN (Cerro Grande fire). I was, at first, taken aback by the lady announcer they had on the air.  
    But the more I listened, the more I really began to like her. Her jerky, staccato, school-marmish, breezy, amateurish (in the highest sense of the word) on-air delivery often left me in stitches.
    A smooth, polished, well coiffed Katie Couric she ain’t. But CBS News’ loss is Los Alamos’ gain. Gillian Sutton ... you’re simply the best!!!

  • Roundabouts may have hampered evacuation

    I am glad to hear the recent evacuation went well.  
    Imagine how it would have gone had the proposed seven roundabouts on Trinity Drive had been in place.
    Contact your favorite council person.

    Phyllis B. Holland
    Los Alamos

  • Requesting council provide explanation on MIG deal

    Los Alamos County Council, I was recently informed that despite being shown data that proves the MIG presentation and proposals are severely faulted, you intend to continue to invest our tax dollars in hiring them — at the tune of another $80,000 — to present more of their biased analysis.  
    So far, I think you’ve already paid them $400,000 for this venture alone. I am asking you now for a justification statement for this continued expenditure. In any well run business, large expenditures can always be formally justified by a written statement.  
    I am asking you for this written statement.

  • LAFD addresses risk issue

    Although we share the concerns of our community for the safety of Los Alamos, our graduated approach was arrived at by evaluating the risk of these activities taking into consideration the locations at which they will occur.
    Public fireworks display, given the dry conditions we are confident that with the location (limited continuity of combustible material) and types of fireworks used at this display much of the hazard is limited.
    Over the years that this display has been held at Overlook Park the display has never threatened our community including the dry years following 2000.
    This display has given our community a venue during this holidays that may limit the private use of fireworks, which are far more dangerous to the public and property.

  • Fire risk questioned

    I commend the Los Alamos County Council for imposing a partial fireworks, campfire and smoking ban in some portions of the county in this extreme drought.  
    According to Asst. Fire Chief Thompson, “...the ignition potential for the forest has been determined to be 100 percent, meaning that every ember reaching combustible material has the potential to start a fire” (Los Alamos Monitor, June 22).
    But Idongedit.
    If the danger is this high (and I don’t doubt that it is), why not impose a complete ban?  
    Why are ANY fireworks and ANY campfires or grill fires allowed?  Why take the risk?
    Can’t we all forgo those pleasures until after the monsoons arrive, in the interest of safety?

  • Government contracting: A new path to revenue?

    In times of economic upheaval when private sector output slows, government contracts may mean the difference between running a company at profit rather than loss.
    The Procurement Technical Assistance Program, set up by the New Mexico Small Business Development Network in 2009, is a non-profit organization that helps small businesses obtain government contracts.
    PTAP counselors provide seminars and help clients identify government contract opportunities. Most PTAP services are provided free of charge. The federal- and state-funded organization has helped more than 600 New Mexico clients obtain over $70 million in government contracts.

  • Local schools need community's help

    On June 14, during the lunch break from my employer-funded MATLAB training course I attended a Kiwanis meeting.  
    There I heard Dr. Gene Schmidt, LAPS superintendent and John Wolfe, LAPS business manager, describe the school’s budgeting process.  
    Next year’s program budget will be about $700,000 less than last year’s and the schools have had to make some serious cuts!   
    For example, over the last few years the amount available for professional development has shrunk by more than $150,000.
    Our teachers have not had a pay raise for four years. In fact, because of increased deductions for retirement and benefits, their take home pay has actually shrunk.

  • Test to reveal the truth about traffic circles

    I have read several letters to the editor supporting the idea of a two-lane Trinity Drive with roundabouts.
    These letters presented arguments that show how roundabouts have worked in other areas. Yet when I ask people I know for their thoughts on the matter, I have not heard a single person say they’re looking forward to the change.

  • Look who benefits from traffic circle travesty

    Regarding the ill advised plan to construct eight traffic circles in a 4.2 mile stretch of Trinity Drive —  while the bombardment of ads about how great traffic circles are continues to bombard us at the Reel Deal theater, and we watch the waste of money being spent trying to convince a dubious public that this really is a good idea, one can only echo the Roman judge Lucius Cassius: “Cui bono?”  Who benefits?
    Eight traffic circles in four miles?  That’s one traffic circle every half a mile - creating an accelerate-decelerate cycle that disrupts traffic flow, commute speed and fuel economy.  Who benefits?

  • Teamwork leads to big success

    A community working together can accomplish amazing things, and LA Cares is grateful.  On Saturday, May 7, the local chapter of the National Association of Letter Carriers and the Boy Scouts of America teamed up for the semi-annual Help Stamp Out Hunger food collection.
    With support from the Postal Service – mailing the postcard reminders, use of trucks and facilities – the carriers picked up bags of food left on mailboxes along their routes, and delivered them for sorting.