• Let's stop going around in circles

    While attending a local function, I noticed quite a number of people gathered around wanting to sign a petition. I was pleased for the opportunity to participate myself, when I heard it was in opposition to the proposed “Traffic Circles/Roundabouts” on Trinity Drive.
    I personally did not hear anyone coming forward with praise for their excellent past experiences with traffic circles. At that function and since however, I have heard and read numerous astute insights into why “If It Ain’t Broke Don’t Fix It” illustrated.
    I then began thinking back myself to when I grew up in southern California and found myself and my car pool buddy commuting from the South Bay Area to Long Beach State College.

  • Find your voice

    I would like to recount for you my most recent medical circumstances that prompted me to write this letter, so here goes ... I started feeling like I was coming down with something on Sunday, Aug. 7 … nothing dramatic, just tired, and headachy. I came to work on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday still felling a little puny.
    Wednesday just before 5 p.m. I really started to feel bad, added to my already feeling of puny, I developed a severe pain going from my chest to my back — straight through.
    Thursday morning I awoke to pain from the top of my head to soles of my feet. I decided to take my temperature and it registered 101.7.

  • Put safety above all else

    Recently I read in the Los Alamos Monitor where the county is spending even more money than it already has on the issue of studying the “need” of narrowing Trinity Drive and adding roundabouts.  
    Recently, I also read in the Los Alamos Monitor an article about human stupidity by John Pawlak. In the past 11 years, Los Alamos has had to evacuate twice because of forest fires. The  fire of 2000 started because of lack of logic/common sense. What happens if another disaster should hit Los Alamos and the need for evacuation.  Right now Trinity Drive is the only town street that has four lanes leading directly out of Los Alamos.  

  • Abandon the plan to tear up Trinity Drive

    Roundabouts or not, the tearing up and rebuilding of Trinity Drive for a multi-year project will destroy those few small businesses, which still exist downtown, because the lab traffic will migrate to the truck route and Pajarito Road, bypassing the downtown business district altogether.   
    Choking Trinity to two lanes to make room for a bicycle lane may be politically correct, but it will be the economic death for the struggling Los Alamos retail community. We’ve already lost one of our favorite local stores, Cook’n in Style, and several other small businesses are on the ropes.

  • Stop sensationalizing family tragedy

    Freedom of the press is very important. Freedom of the press used to sensationalize a family tragedy to sell papers cannot be prevented, but I strongly object.
    The front-page headline and story in Wednesday’s Los Alamos Monitor compels me to object for these good people, friends, whose families have been in Los Alamos for generations, object in compassion for the mentally ill, object over endless rehashing of the story.
    Others feel the same, as well they should. Enough already.  

    Sue King
    Los Alamos


  • Not willing to let Trinity endanger kids

    As a biker, I am more than willing to avoid Trinity Drive during rush hours. As a taxpayer, I am appalled at the money we are throwing at this proposed redesign. As a parent, I would NOT allow my precious young children to cross this road at any time.
    There is nothing they need on that side of the road. Older children have the crosswalks. The hidden agenda of this redesign appears to be to make Trinity Drive so slow that morning and evening traffic will use the truck route or Pajarito Road.

  • Seeing regular folks become heroes

    On June 27, normal life stopped for all of us in Los Alamos because of the Las Conchas Fire.  
    As residents abandoned their homes to escape the fire, the firefighters of Los Alamos, including my daughter’s fiance, left their families to rush into harm’s way.  
    During the first hours of the fire, the men and women who make up the Los Alamos Fire Department provided a protective barrier between Los Alamos and the fast moving fire.
    There were no Hot Shots, helicopters with water buckets or planes with slurry, just the firefighters and personnel from Los Alamos County, making their stand by downing trees and making a barrier in order to try to get control of the direction of the fire.

  • Call for change in policy

    The situation in Los Alamos reflects so many other areas that are vulnerable to wildfires. Tragedy can be alleviated and losses kept to minimum through a change in national policy. I am referring to the policy of contracting for air fire suppression.
    Consider the C-17 Globemaster: 1. A load capacity of 170,000 lbs. (that’s  21,250 gallons of water). 2. Capable of dropping loads near ground level. 3.  There are three squadrons based at Lewis-McChord in Tacoma, Washington. 4.  Range is 2,400 nautical miles fully loaded. 5. Capable of operating from  airfields of 3,500 ft of runway and 90ft width. 6. Their mission is to:  

  • Roundabouts do work

    As we evacuated, I thought about what evacuation traffic might be like if Trinity Drive had roundabouts instead of the traffic lights currently in place.
    Guess what? Los Alamos  County police officers had to be stationed at each of these intersections to keep traffic moving in effect creating a roundabout.
    This appeared to be necessary because traffic lights turning red would have stopped traffic flow and caused backups.
    My thanks to the county police for helping us avoid the joys of sitting at a red light with no side traffic waiting to evacuate town.

    Daniel Varley
    Los Alamos

  • Firefighters just wanted to help

    The Rogers Family wishes to thank Los Alamos firefighters Danny McBride and Eric Gonzalez for their help Sunday morning, July 3.
    It was great to have a welcome-home wave from personnel at various checkpoints as we approached Los Alamos — I remember the waves when we returned after the Cerro Grande Fire.
    Small things can mean a lot; but the really “big thing” was provided by Danny McBride and Eric Gonzalez who stopped, while driving through the Cumbres del Norte neighborhood around 10 a.m., and asked if we needed help.
    I thought it might take us most of the week to unload three tightly-packed vehicles because unloading would involve carrying things up the equivalent of one to two flights of stairs.