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Letters

  • Seeing regular folks become heroes

    On June 27, normal life stopped for all of us in Los Alamos because of the Las Conchas Fire.  
    As residents abandoned their homes to escape the fire, the firefighters of Los Alamos, including my daughter’s fiance, left their families to rush into harm’s way.  
    During the first hours of the fire, the men and women who make up the Los Alamos Fire Department provided a protective barrier between Los Alamos and the fast moving fire.
    There were no Hot Shots, helicopters with water buckets or planes with slurry, just the firefighters and personnel from Los Alamos County, making their stand by downing trees and making a barrier in order to try to get control of the direction of the fire.

  • Call for change in policy

    The situation in Los Alamos reflects so many other areas that are vulnerable to wildfires. Tragedy can be alleviated and losses kept to minimum through a change in national policy. I am referring to the policy of contracting for air fire suppression.
    Consider the C-17 Globemaster: 1. A load capacity of 170,000 lbs. (that’s  21,250 gallons of water). 2. Capable of dropping loads near ground level. 3.  There are three squadrons based at Lewis-McChord in Tacoma, Washington. 4.  Range is 2,400 nautical miles fully loaded. 5. Capable of operating from  airfields of 3,500 ft of runway and 90ft width. 6. Their mission is to:  

  • Roundabouts do work

    As we evacuated, I thought about what evacuation traffic might be like if Trinity Drive had roundabouts instead of the traffic lights currently in place.
    Guess what? Los Alamos  County police officers had to be stationed at each of these intersections to keep traffic moving in effect creating a roundabout.
    This appeared to be necessary because traffic lights turning red would have stopped traffic flow and caused backups.
    My thanks to the county police for helping us avoid the joys of sitting at a red light with no side traffic waiting to evacuate town.

    Daniel Varley
    Los Alamos

  • Firefighters just wanted to help

    The Rogers Family wishes to thank Los Alamos firefighters Danny McBride and Eric Gonzalez for their help Sunday morning, July 3.
    It was great to have a welcome-home wave from personnel at various checkpoints as we approached Los Alamos — I remember the waves when we returned after the Cerro Grande Fire.
    Small things can mean a lot; but the really “big thing” was provided by Danny McBride and Eric Gonzalez who stopped, while driving through the Cumbres del Norte neighborhood around 10 a.m., and asked if we needed help.
    I thought it might take us most of the week to unload three tightly-packed vehicles because unloading would involve carrying things up the equivalent of one to two flights of stairs.

  • Many areas subject to wild fires

    The situation in Los Alamos reflects so many other areas that are vulnerable to wild fires. Tragedy can be alleviated and losses kept to minimum through a change in national policy. I am referring to the policy of contracting for air fire suppression.
    Consider the C-17 Globemaster:
    •A load capacity of 170,000 lbs. (that’s 21,250 gallons of water).
    •Capable of dropping loads near ground level.
    •There are three squadrons based at Lewis-McChord in Tacoma, Wash.
    •Range is 2,400 nautical miles fully loaded.
    •Capable of operating from airfields of 3,500 feet of runway and 90 feet width.

  • Good experience at Dr. Tom's

    We recently took our three children for their annual physicals with Dr. Tom Csanadi (Dr. Tom) in his new office. He saw them together, taking time to exam and speak to them.
    Our children have never seemed happier after a doctor’s appointment.  They talked all through dinner about the funny things Dr. Tom said and how they’re no longer nervous about going to the doctor.
    Our’s children’s ages span a daughter going to high school and a son in kindergarten who were equally happy with their visits. Dr. Coombs came over from her OB-GYN practice to visit with us — it’s one stop shopping!
    We couldn’t recommend Dr. Tom more highly ... it’s so nice to have options out there now.

  • Lots of kudos go to KRSN

    I don’t listen much to KRSN. But when I need them, like the recent Las Conchas evacuation, they’re always there at A.M. 1490. They did a clearly spectacular job over the period of the fire in keeping us all informed and connected.
    Things have changed since I last listened to KRSN (Cerro Grande fire). I was, at first, taken aback by the lady announcer they had on the air.  
    But the more I listened, the more I really began to like her. Her jerky, staccato, school-marmish, breezy, amateurish (in the highest sense of the word) on-air delivery often left me in stitches.
    A smooth, polished, well coiffed Katie Couric she ain’t. But CBS News’ loss is Los Alamos’ gain. Gillian Sutton ... you’re simply the best!!!

  • Roundabouts may have hampered evacuation

    I am glad to hear the recent evacuation went well.  
    Imagine how it would have gone had the proposed seven roundabouts on Trinity Drive had been in place.
    Contact your favorite council person.

    Phyllis B. Holland
    Los Alamos

  • Requesting council provide explanation on MIG deal

    Los Alamos County Council, I was recently informed that despite being shown data that proves the MIG presentation and proposals are severely faulted, you intend to continue to invest our tax dollars in hiring them — at the tune of another $80,000 — to present more of their biased analysis.  
    So far, I think you’ve already paid them $400,000 for this venture alone. I am asking you now for a justification statement for this continued expenditure. In any well run business, large expenditures can always be formally justified by a written statement.  
    I am asking you for this written statement.

  • LAFD addresses risk issue

    Although we share the concerns of our community for the safety of Los Alamos, our graduated approach was arrived at by evaluating the risk of these activities taking into consideration the locations at which they will occur.
    Public fireworks display, given the dry conditions we are confident that with the location (limited continuity of combustible material) and types of fireworks used at this display much of the hazard is limited.
    Over the years that this display has been held at Overlook Park the display has never threatened our community including the dry years following 2000.
    This display has given our community a venue during this holidays that may limit the private use of fireworks, which are far more dangerous to the public and property.