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Letters

  • Book demand is only partially predictable

    Inventory management is always the trickiest challenge for any business. You want to have enough of an item on hand to meet the demand, but you don’t want to have more on hand that is needed to meet the demand.  The problem is that demand is only partially predictable; you can, after some time, get a good sense of average demand and seasonal demand, but there will be times when there are unusual spikes and there you are with a customer wanting something you normally carry but you are out of stock. The only solution is to order the extra required to fill the spike.

  • This town needs a strong mayor

    So, the Charter Review Committee has deemed that the county and a strong mayor type government are not a good fit. We are after all a city/county government. What is wrong with having a strong mayor where there is a true separation of powers?
    What is wrong with having a mayor who makes decisions without having to pass everything before a seven-person council?
    If, as the Charter Review Committee deems, we might have a weak mayor, which would appear to look like a council with eight members.

  • Much of corridor broken

    I would like to provide some corrections and clarifications to comments that are being made by opponents of the proposed changes to NM502/Trinity Drive, as it seems to me that the opponents have not followed the public information sessions nor are they providing correct commentary on many aspects of the design or reasons for change.

  • Sharing road spells safety

    A Five feet to Pass bill is making its way through the New Mexico legislature and hopefully will become law.
    I am a cyclist. I am part of a small minority that ride bicycles for exercise, fitness and enjoyment.  Northern New Mexico, while a beautiful place to ride, has roads that are notorious for having inadequate shoulders or no shoulders at all, forcing bicyclists to ride in the traffic lane.

  • Age should not impact importance of teams

    The sports page for the Los Alamos Monitor has all the high school sports and stats but usually doesn’t have the middle school sports. 

    Why is that? Just because we are a few years younger doesn’t mean our teams are any less important. 

  • Joe Sixpacks scarce around here

    Dear Mr. Todd:  You haven’t lived here very long have you? I take this tack rather than accuse you of not being very observant — of the relatively small population of “Joe Sixpacks” here as opposed to the overwhelmingly large number of hyperanalytic citizens.
    “The ardor for analysis” that you deride pervades “every nook and cranny” of our county government as an accurate and democratic reflection of the main character of our citizenry.

  • Shame on all involved

    The so-called “economic recovery” of 2011 is summarized in one sentence that dominated the news on Feb. 7: “Ford says that it is boosting its U.S. production, by 13 percent, of Lincoln and Ford Explorer SUV’s to keep up with demand, but Ford hasn’t yet decided it will add extra workers.”
    We can rejoice because the stock market is up and the very rich can confidently spend their millions on luxury items. Just ignore those pesky unemployment, foreclosure and bankruptcy figures.

  • CROP Walk success thanks to support

    The annual CROP (Communities Responding to Overcome Poverty) Hunger Walk, was held in conjunction with the Turkey Trot Nov. 21, 2010, in memory of its local founder and coordinator for many years, Aaron Goldman.
    The 2010 Los Alamos CROP Hunger Walk raised net proceeds totaling $12,000, which was the top fundraising CROP Walk in New Mexico.
    Over 200 walkers and runners participated.

  • Insist that the new LANL director lives here

    I have heard complaints that the upper echelon of LANL leadership is not involved in local affairs because they don’t live in Los Alamos.  
    Instead Director Michael Anastasio and others choose to live in Santa Fe.
    This is a significant change from the past when the lab director and his top executives lived in Los Alamos.

  • Effort keeps neighbors warm

    Curves thanks all the community members who donated blankets and electrical cooking items for our neighbors without natural gas.  
    It was amazing how many items we were able to collect in just a matter of hours. The blankets went to the armory to be used on cots for people spending the night and the other items went to individuals who are trying to stay in their own homes.