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Letters

  • Letter to the Editor 4-5-17

    Opposed to new White Rock ZIP Code

    I share John Ramsay’s objection to the USPS designation, “White Rock,” as part of my mailing address. (ref: Monitor letter of March 29, 2017) White Rock is not an incorporated city, nor is Los Alamos. Our only local government is that of an H-class county.
    It is entirely resonable to separate areas within the county by ZIP codes to expedite mail delivery, but not to arbitrarily change the name of the destination.
    To suggest that both must be changed to deliver mail to my residence, which hasn’t changed its physical location in 50 years, is ludicrous. For examply, the city where I was born (before ZIP codes were invented) is also called, “LA.”
    By my count, it is now subdivided by the USPS into 214 ZIP codes. One city name, more than 200 ZIP codes, yet the USPS seems able to cope. Why not here?
    Don Hanson
    Los Alamos

  • Letters to the Editor 3-29-17

    County plan to build Splash Pad bad idea

    I just read in the Daily Post that the Los Alamos County Council is considering building a Splash Pad park in White Rock. My initial response was “Boy the county can’t wait to spend our tax dollars on nonsense once again.”
    The worst part of it is that they want to borrow more money to get this project and others done!  It seems to me that we haven’t learned anything from watching our National Government take us, the citizens, into debt that could possibly collapse our economy!  
    Do you realize that the Splash Pad area is a bad idea - let me share the reasons why I think it is.
    It will only be used a maximum of two months out of the year during hot weather. These type of projects are built in Phoenix and other places where they can be utilized several months out of the year.
    The cost of building this park is not worth going into debt for.
    It will be built in White Rock which means it will only serve that community for the most part.
    Once again, as citizens of Los Alamos/White Rock, we will be stuck with subsidizing maintenance, etc.  

  • Letter to the Editor 3-22-17

    Bill 412 is double taxation

    House Bill 412 calls for closing many exemption loopholes to address the budget crisis that our state faces.  No doubt, there are many aspects of the Tax Reform Bill that need just that – reform. However, HB 412 also calls for the eliminating the sales tax exemption for Non-Profits – all Non-Profits large, small, 501c3, churches etc.  Thus subjecting non-profits to Sales and Gross Receipts Tax.
    Under HB 412, Non-Profits would need to collect and pay GRT on all contracts (local, state, federal), grants from foundations and United Way, fees from programs, classes and services. Most non-profits are local, community-oriented, and are responding to community needs. Many exist on grants and contacts to provide services that government is not.
    This has the potential to be disastrous for non-profits, and I have a front row seat in that regard, as a volunteer sitting on the board of The Family YMCA.

  • Letters to the Editor 3-12-17

    Family thanks community for love and support

    Ida S. Pacheco and her family want to thank you for the kind and encouraging words, beautiful flowers, lovely cards, thoughts, prayers and masses. All that you shared to console our hearts in the loss of Raymond David Pacheco, have comforted and sustained us. Thank you most sincerely for your generous support and sympathy.
    The Pacheco Family
    Los Alamos

    Much to be thankful for
    living in Los Alamos

    We have always loved living in Los Alamos. The views are beautiful and what other small town has enjoyed a Joshua Bell concert? But there are other reasons that make it nice to live here even when it is not a good day.

  • Letter to the Editor 3-3-17

    Easter is worst time for pet rabbits, rabbit rescuers

    Easter is the worst time for pet rabbits and for rabbit rescuers. Many people will buy their children a pet rabbit for Easter, only to learn that a few weeks, even days later, their children, have lost interest and that the rabbits are a lot more work than expected.
    This leads to people surrendering their pet to the shelter, or worse, just dumping domestic rabbits in the wild, which leaves these prey animals unprotected and essentially left to die from starvation, predators, humans and diseases.
    NM House Rabbit Society has rented the back of several Albuquerque buses and Santa Fe buses to try to educate people on the many needs of these creatures.
    Please help spread the word to not get rabbits for children for Easter gifts in anyway possible. Thank you so much for all that you do for our rabbit rescue organization. Each and everyone of you is greatly appreciated.  
    Laura Allen
    NM House Rabbit
    Society Volunteer

  • Letters to the Editor 2-10-17

    Support HB 123, a bill that addresses overpopulation of unwanted animals

    I write in support of House Bill 123, a bill that responds to legislative momentum to address New Mexico’s overpopulation of unwanted companion animals, a problem which results in the euthanasia of 60,000 dogs and cats each year.
    HB 123 creates a non-appropriations based mechanism for funding state low-cost spay/neuter through a $100 a year surcharge on pet food companies for each dog or cat food product type sold here, raising about $750,000 a year. Unwanted companion animals are a statewide epidemic that impacts not only dogs and cats, but New Mexico’s families and counties. Counties, in particular, bear the fiscal brunt of this statewide problem. For example, a 2012 study on the scope and impact of animal overpopulation showed that collectively counties budgeted $27 million in 2011 to fund animal shelters (an increase of $2.1 million from 2008), even as upwards of 80 percent of shelters’ animals were euthanized. In 2012, those costs increased, as we would expect.

  • Letter to the Editor 2-8-17

    That gut-wrenching pain

    Have you felt that painful, tightening, gut-wrenching feeling when you hear someone state something that infringes upon your rights or beliefs?
    Good, that means you’re human. The feeling comes from an emotional system that helps us survive.
    Have you allowed that feeling to develop into anger towards the one expressing the statement?
    That’s not good. It’s true that anger is part of our humanity, but it comes from the lowest and most ancient parts of our brain, one we share with lizards.
    Have you taken an oppositional stance of the idea or policy that was stated?
    That’s good. You’re using the higher levels of your brain to do something constructive with that painful feeling you felt initially.
    Is your opposition causing you to see the one who made the statement as someone from another group that’s evil?
    That’s not good. You’re letting the lower levels of your brain control the higher levels. You’re developing what we call hatred.
    Is your opposition directed at the idea or policy that was stated with the understanding that the one who made the statement is your brother or sister?

  • Letter to the Editor 2-5-17

    Ellen Ben-Naim is my choice for school board

    Los Alamos has an opportunity for fresh, community-minded leadership on the school board. Ellen Ben-Naim will provide new insights and vigorous advocacy for teachers and students. As a professional educator with a master’s degree and enormous community experience, Ellen will provide oppressive teacher evaluation, mental health, increase teacher salaries and reduce oppressive teacher evaluation. Ellen is an excellent people-connector and communicator. She will serve our community well.
    Ellen supports mental health issues and is committed to enacting recommendations from the Mental Health Design Team Plan. These mental health issues, including stress and depression, affect our students and faculty. Ellen recognizes the need for more community awareness around these issues.
    Ellen has a child attending Los Alamos High School. She understands the issues of today’s families and she is committed to voicing these perspectives.
    As a community-oriented person, Ellen spent four years as a the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board program coordinator. She has enthusiastically served on many LAPS committees, including the School Budget Committee, School Bond Committee, District Parent Council and GATE Advisory Committee.

  • Letters to the Editor 2-3-17

    Time is approaching for seasonal employees

    While we are still in the icy grip of winter, summer is not that far off and with it will come a small crowd of summer seasonal employees, here to work the season and looking for a place to live.
    With the ever-tightening housing market in Los Alamos and the requirement for yearly leases, summer employees find it difficult to locate housing.
    Los Alamos National Laboratory often dominates the scene with its summer interns and techs that visit for projects during the summer, allowing few opportunities for others. Santa Fe and Española have housing available, but the distance and price make it much more costly and less efficient.
    Most summer seasonals will start their season in April or May (some even earlier) and finish up in the fall around October. If you have a small apartment, efficiency or room available that you would be willing to rent for less than the usual 12 months, to an outgoing, pleasant, quiet, hardworking (hopefully) person, please let me know and I can pass on this information to those who are looking for a place to stay this summer.
    Brian Kliesen
    White Rock

    Apologies to drivers
    running amok around town

  • Letters to the Editor 2-01-17

    Jim Hall has leadership that is needed on school board

    Voters in the Piñon district have a choice that one wishes every voter would always have, namely, two excellent candidates. I have had the pleasure to work with Jim Hall and Ellen Ben-Naim. They are both dedicated public servants who care deeply about our students, teachers, and schools.
    If I were eligible to vote, I’d give my nod to Jim Hall. Jim has a remarkable set of experiences from leading business computing at the lab to serving as the State Chief Information Officer, to serving as a county councilor, our state representative, and president of the school board. Jim is also a successful businessman and property developer, who serves on the board of the Los Alamos Commerce and Development Corporation. He understands budgets and information technology from both a private and public sector perspective. His breadth of knowledge is an invaluable asset for governing our schools, especially in times of resource constraints and changing needs for our students and teachers to meet the challenges of the 21st century.