• Letter to the editor 10-4-15

    30th-Annual Heart Council Health Fair a success

    The 30th-annual Los Alamos Heart Council Health Fair, held at Griffith Gymnasium on Sept. 26 was a tremendous success! We had over 2,000 attendees. There were more than 70 exhibitors representing a wide range of health-related organizations from Los Alamos and surrounding communities. A total of some 800 flu shots were given and hundreds of blood draws were done, as well as many other health screenings. With this year’s emphasis on children and families, hundreds more parents and children attended than ever before. More than 150 free bike helmets were given out at the fair and, in a new program, an additional 60 helmets will be given directly to elementary and pre-schools in Los Alamos. Hundreds of free children’s backpacks we given out, as well.

  • Thank you to volunteer exchange program host family

    This September, a family in Los Alamos enjoyed a special experience by welcoming into their home a high school exchange student from Germany. This volunteer host family is participating in the SHARE! Student Exchange Program for the 2015-16 school year. And this international exchange student is eager to learn about how Americans live.
    I am prompted to write an expression of enormous gratitude to the host family, the high school and community. As the regional director for this program, I have helped local coordinators find the host families and helped them select a student who best fits their family. Local coordinators and our regional office staff will supervise and monitor our families and exchange students throughout their stay.
    There are now several outstanding candidates awaiting host families for the 2016 spring semester. If anyone has thought about hosting, now is an excellent time to start.  Please contact me as soon as possible. This is a great opportunity to SHARE! your heart and home with the rest of the world.

  • Letters to the editor 9-11-15

    Appreciate the dirt work

    Over the past decade or so, I have had the opportunity to participate in how Los Alamos County would evolve in some areas: especially tennis and public works streets and roads, naming of public builds, etc. I tried to do more than being a voice bigger than I am, but tried to back up my positions with facts and figures. I was pretty rough on some the public works projects.
    While my letters were not always received well, I appreciated one of you telling me you did pay attention to what I wrote. I want to thank the council for its effort to continue to see that the tennis court surfaces in the county receive proper attention to keep them playable.
    It is appropriate that I write, since this is probably my last letter to you, be about public works and its streets and roads people. For many years, my (our: see the cosigners) cul-de-sac has been a most neglected piece of county roadway. Public works finally put the project on the books this year with Shelton and Erickson noting that the surface was pretty much dirt — well, we were growing grass there. The first efforts to remove a foot or so of material was met with even worse material below.

  • Letter to the editor 9-6-15

    Possibly finding common ground with Harold Morgan

    It is a pleasure, for once, to be able to agree with Harold Morgan.
    In his Wednesday column he says: “The left has a mythical attachment to raiding the Permanent Fund for money to spend on education.”
    I agree completely that the claimed attachment is entirely a myth. On the other hand, if he meant to say “mystical” ... well, we can’t all be William F. Buckley or George F. Will.
    For most of the rest of the column he returned to expected for, but he concludes with: “Less ideologically driven research would help.” Again, I would agree with him, but I suspect that he really only longs for research driven by a different ideology.

    Terry Goldman
    Los Alamos

  • Letter to the editor 9-2-15

    American Legion Post 90
    supports Christmas project

    American Legion Post 90 of Los Alamos is supporting Operation Christmas Child, a shoebox ministry of many churches across the United States.
    The Post is purchasing 50 inflatable soccer balls to go with the ones provided by White Rock Presbyterian Church.
    Each year, Mary Medendorp heads up the effort to collect shoeboxes to be packed with pens, pencils, writing paper, crayons, water colors, small stuffed animals, dolls and more. The soccer balls will be packed with a pump to bring the ball to life.
    In one instance, a young boy in a third world country this was a life changing gift experience. That gave him purpose and direction in his life.
    These shoebox Christmas gifts go all over the world in many countries, including some in the United States. The operation is worldwide.
    GI’s have always had a soft spot for kids. In one panel cartoonist Bill Mauldin shows Willie and Joe, in rumpled uniforms with a steel helmet and a rifle slung over their shoulders, handing out C-rations to a small group of kids.
    In my outfit we would toss chewing gum and candy bars to the French children as we passed through a village in a six-by-six.

  • Letter to the editor 8-21-15

    Politics shouldn’t factor
    into marketing decisions

    I must firmly agree with Mark Hendrickson, who wrote, “When political decisions about where to allocate scarce economic resources supplant market decisions, production is inevitably diverted from the most highly valued needs to less valued things.”
    Exactly! Consider some examples:
    The federal government has succumbed to huge political pressures to fund immensely expensive studies of biology, the human genome and diseases. Are any medical insurance companies funding this? No, of course not, because there is no market value, which clearly means this money has been wasted and diverted from the valued things of expensive medicines and marginally effective health care.
    Similarly, the government spent small fortunes on electronic communications to supplant telephone and telegraph lines and pointless fundamental research, which accidentally led to the creation of the World Wide Web.
    Did any business support this? No. Another waste of tax dollars.

  • Letters to the editor 8-17-15

    Clean up LAHS — Do it for Bill

    On Thursday, the retired teachers of Los Alamos Schools had their annual Not Back-To-School breakfast. Everybody was talking about Bill Hudson and writing notes to him … the guy who became such an icon of Los Alamos.
    After our breakfast I visited Bill Hudson and I am delighted to report that he is out of the hospital and at his home. He is telling jokes and laughing at other’s feeble attempts at jocularity. He is resting comfortably and his mind is sharp. He is living abundantly each day and he missed not being at the retired teachers’ breakfast. He is planning on attending the next one in August 2016! I promised him that I will pick him up and take him.
    With the candor that he and I shared for two score and three years — I asked him about his dedication to the community of Los Alamos if there is some unfinished project that I could help with.
    Bill asked me to write a letter to the editor and ask that the high school students would pick up trash on the grounds of Los Alamos High School.
    I beg the faculty, staff and students and all the good people of Los Alamos to do that for the “Old Jock,” so that next year at the School Retirees’ Breakfast we can show Bill, Los Alamos listens when Bill talks!

    Pete Jandacek

  • Letters to the editor 8-7-15

    Missoula Theatre
    a complete success

    On behalf of the Los Alamos Arts Council, we would like to thank the cast members of Missoula Children’s Theatre’s production of “The Jungle Book” for their wonderful performance.
    The arts council would like to thank Los Alamos County for co-sponsoring this event, which was also partially funded by a grant from the New Mexico Children’s Foundation.
    We would also like to thank all the parents and friends of the cast who attended the play on Saturday, as well as the staff of Crossroads Bible Church. They were wonderful to work with and made the week a complete success.
    Additionally, many thanks go to Los Alamos Arts Council board members who volunteered their time to help make this year’s production a wonderful experience for the participants and to all of LAAC supporters whose annual membership fees make programs like this possible.  
    Finally, thanks, as always, to the community of Los Alamos for supporting the many programs and events presented by the Los Alamos Arts Council.

    Margaret McIntyre
    Chris Monteith
    Missoula Children’s Theatre,
    Los Alamos Arts Council

    The Sanctuary
    at Canyon’s Edge

  • Letters to the editor 8-5-15

    Two sides to oil story

    Marita Noon doesn’t refer to the advantages of forbidding exports of American oil.
    Aside from enhancing national security, it keeps oil prices down here, which is good for the American consumer, however difficult for oil companies.
    Since refined products may be exported, it also increases American industrial jobs by supporting keeping and building American refineries.
    Whether or not these considerations override supporting Canadian and minimizing Iranian oil exports, “you can judge for yourself.” But one should at least be honest about the various sides to the discussion.

    Terry Goldman
    Los Alamos

    Flat roofs will eventually leak

    I can’t understand why the county feels a need to keep trying to find a flat roof that doesn’t leak.
    Our house was built with a pitched roof in 1970 by Home Planning.  The original roof has been replaced twice. They have never leaked.
    I have never been to college, but I know that the county needs to stop building libraries with flat roofs.

    Camille Morrison
    White Rock

    Saturday delivery for Sunday paper?

  • Letter to the editor 7-30-15

    More must be done for N.M. children

    Early last week, information was published by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, ranking the 50 states on various factors that indicate child well being.
    New Mexico is a jaw-dropping 49th — even more astounding, our state has hovered in this area, dropping to 50th position in 2013, for several years.
    Child poverty rates around the state are increasing steadily and programs to help these children are few and far between.
    Looking at this information, coupled with the start of the 2015-2016 school year quickly approaching, and everything that goes along with it — the stress of homework, readjusting to the school schedule, and making new friends — and it is easy to imagine this can be a difficult, overwhelming time for a child.
    Los Alamos is widely praised throughout the state and beyond, as being a great community, due to the affluent nature of the community.
    Even in a community like Los Alamos, there are children and families struggling and in need.
    We must do better for all of our children.
    It sounds daunting, impossible even, but there is a way to make a difference: volunteer.
    The Family YMCA is proud to be the only YMCA in New Mexico and one of 38 states that is currently offering the free Reach and Rise Mentoring Program.