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Letters

  • Letters to the editor 7-3-14

     

    The Y helps people with financial aid

    Reviewing applications for financial aid is truly a humbling experience.

    I communicate with each by email or telephone, and all of them share their overwhelming relief, appreciation, joy, and gratitude because the Y’s assistance has helped them, their family or children. At our Y, this is more than 200 people helped; 72 kids in camp and afterschool care, and 140 people of all ages in healthy programs.

    Donors do important work. They help children access safe, supervised childcare so parents can work. I receive at least one scholarship application a day now as we are enrolling for Camp and After School.

  • Letters to the editor 06-22-14

     

    Gratitude and a plea

    This is a heartfelt thanks to members and leaders of Junior Girl Scout Troop No. 10027 for your outstanding beautification project between the Aquatic Center and the canyon trails! It is a wonderful improvement to the area and your efforts are greatly appreciated.

    How grand it would be if this special spot, and all other areas of our community, could remain free of litter for all to enjoy! 

    Once a week, on the daily morning dog walk, I collect a full bag of trash behind the Aquatic Center and on the trail that begins below the parking lot. (I know others do this as well.) By the evening walk more trash has already accumulated. The abundance of bottles, cans, plastic items and paper products of every description, which are seen along our streets and trails, does not support the local belief that we are a highly intelligent community. 

  • Letters to the editor 06-08-14

     

    More support for Dr. Lindberg

    Over the past few weeks, I have seen two letters in the Los Alamos Monitor regarding the termination of Dr. Peter Lindberg’s contract with the Los Alamos Medical Center (LAMC). Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in males after skin cancer. 

    Each year, more than 186,000 males learn they have prostate cancer and more than 3,500 die from its advanced forms. Dr. Lindberg is New Mexico’s leading physician in understanding and treating this cancer. He is recognized throughout the country as one of the leading practicioners. 

    Dr. Lindberg reads extensively to keep up with research, treatment statistics and United States physicians diagnosing and treating prostrate cancer. He also publishes an occasional newsletter describing advances in this medical area.

  • Patroling not profiling

    Two weeks ago I was victim of a gas theft in the night at my house in the Western Area.
    When my almost empty tank was re-filled it cost $34. I called the police to report and Jeff Regenold came to take the information. We had a friendly chat, and I said I’d be more careful to lock the car from now on. I asked him to continue the night patrols through town.
    I had to leave the next day on trip to California, and although neighbors are good about picking up my newspapers for me, I know there are bums from out of town who cruise here, looking for open garages and other opportunities for theft.
    I am sorry that the Los Alamos Monitor delivery lady felt racially profiled when a police car followed her as she was delivering papers on North Mesa. I hope he explained and apologized. The police are trying to keep us safe. Her experience recalled an incident that happened many years ago to a friend of mine who had recently moved here.
    When she arrived from Albuquerque after midnight, she noticed a patrol car following her. She drove slowly, going all over town, including Barranca Mesa. When she finally stopped, the officer asked what she was looking for. She said, “Just seeing how far I could lead you all over town.” They both laughed and after he explained, she thanked him for keeping the night watch.

  • Encountering racism in Los Alamos

    My name is Thalia Gibbs-Jackson. I’m a citizen of Los Alamos having moved here November of last year. I was born and grew up in a small town in South Georgia where I graduated high school and went to college. I later transferred to Atlanta and attended Georgia Tech and Southern Tech. I have worked for numerous companies and government contractors. I’ve travelled abroad and have loads of interests. I am also African-American.
    I’ve been working for the Los Alamos Monitor as circulation manager for the past three months. My job involves me sometimes delivering papers for carriers who are out of town or have given up their routes. I’m meticulous in making sure that every person who has paid for a newspaper actually gets it delivered to their home in the manner they have requested.

  • Letter to the editor 9-11-14

     

    Volunteer, inspire tomorrow’s leaders

    Girl members and adult volunteers alike benefit from their Girl Scout experiences. 

    How does a girl accomplish her goal of learning about robotics? Or defy gender stereotypes and become a firefighter, leading a team of other heroes? Or set in motion her dream of becoming a leader when opportunity seems like only a buzzword to her?

    How? It’s simple: Girl Scouts.
    About 30 years ago, my mother signed me up as a Girl Scout in our small hometown. She knew Girl Scouts would be a positive after school activity for me.

  • Bartlit 'spot-on' as always

    John Bartlit’s Sunday column, “Eyes on gold, oil … rare earths,” provided a perfectly balanced, non-opinionated, review of the strategic and economic importance of the 17 named rare-earth elements to the United States.
    As the world’s population continues to grow at an exponential rate anyone reading through the lists of where rare-earths are utilized by modern-day industry can see immediately their importance for the defense industry, computing, the generation of several different forms of solar energy etc.
    He also points out in no uncertain terms that currently the world’s major supply and associated cost is dominated by China and other growing foreign sources. With Russia’s recent embargoes on fuel supplies to EU and former Soviet States in mind we obviously need to concentrate on developing and retaining our own rare-earth resources.
    Once again recycling of used rare-earth containing products is an absolute national must.
    The rare-earths have the ability to react and form compounds/alloys with every known element except most of the noble-gases (helium, argon etc.).
    This made studying them during the 1960s and early-1970s extremely difficult because of the cost and almost impossibility of isolating them as pure metals.

  • More response to Milder's letter

    Ken Milder’s letter encouraging voters to vote down Question 2 on the November ballot has some incorrect and/or misleading statements regarding the revisions proposed to Article V of the Los Alamos County Charter that address the operation and oversight of the Department of Public Utilities (DPU).
    Although it is true that the language in Question 2 appears to be completely new, the text of roughly half of Article V is actually not new, but rather just rearranged for clarity and to separate fundamental issues so that they are not co-mingled, as they are in the current Article V document.
    More importantly, Mr. Milder suggests that under the new charter, council will be able to use the DPU to generate “hidden” revenue for the county, by forcing the Board of Public Utilities (BPU) to raise utility rates and then transfer these funds into the county budget. However, the dispute resolution process in the proposed Article V requires two public meetings and a 5 out of 7 vote by council before council can require the Board to increase utility rates, or force DPU to transfer utility funds to the county. That hardly qualifies as a “hidden” rate increase.

  • Excited about United Way events

    My name is Jenna Erickson and I am the 2014 chair of the United Way Youth Team. It is such an honor for me to be in this position to work on the events that the team has to present to the community this year. I am so excited for everyone to see what we have to offer.
    The members of the team this year are so motivated, creative, passionate and just cannot wait to present all the hard work that they have been doing to everyone. We hope the community is as excited as we are.
    The United Way Youth Team just kicked off its campaign at the beginning of this month. Proceeds from the youth team events benefit the Community Action Fund. Last year, the funds raised at youth team events helped start Link Crew, which is a peer to peer mentoring program at the high school. At the start of the school year, the Link Crew leaders welcomed freshmen into the high school community. Many of the youth team members are also a part of the Link Crew program.

  • Works of art to lead homecoming parade

    The Los Alamos High School graduating class of 1964 will have its 50th reunion in Los Alamos instead of Albuquerque. Opting to hold it on the weekend of LAHS’ homecoming game (Sept. 19), the organizing committee chose to bring to their alma mater and Los Alamos much of the business many reunions give to Albuquerque.
    The administration of LAHS graciously invited the Class of 1964 to ride and walk in the lead of the homecoming parade Friday starting at 2:30 p.m., with a special seating section that evening at the game against Kirtland Central High Bronco’s at 7 p.m.
    Everyone thought it might be really “cool” if the ’64 Homecoming Court could ride in ’64 vintage vehicles … however, locating such transportation proved to be a bit more of a challenge than first thought.
    After putting the word out through various contacts and media, having several volunteers and then drop out due to engine difficulties, it is exciting to finally announce that the ’64 court will be in convertibles and classmates will ride in a beautifully restored pick-up truck — all vintage works of art folks!