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Columns

  • History of women in NM politics

    In our continuing coverage of New Mexico’s centennial year, we focus today on women in New Mexico politics.
    For the first 10 years of statehood, New Mexico had no women in politics. During that period we were the only state west of the Mississippi not to allow women to vote except for education officials. But with the passage of the 19th Amendment in 1920, that changed and women began making up for lost time.
    In 1922, two women were elected to statewide office and one to the state House of Representatives. In addition, Adelina “Ninai” Otero Warren won the Republican nomination to Congress but was defeated in the general election.

  • Dizzy on the Syzgy

    If you’re a triskaidekaphobic or paraskevidekatriaphobic, there is little chance you are reading this. You’re more likely hiding under your bed, covering in fear because today is Friday the 13th. Yeah, well, everyone needs a hobby. Having an irrational fear of numbers or dates is as good as anything, I guess.
    I have to admit that I suffer from coulrophobia, a fear of clowns. Well, that’s not exactly true. Actually, I’m afraid of a clown chasing me with a chainsaw while I’m wearing oversized swimming flippers.
    But Friday the 13th holds a special meaning this month (other than the ultimate fear of being chased by 13 clowns all armed with chainsaws). April 13th is Scrabble Day!

  • Knowing which financial records to keep, toss

    If the memory of hours spent hunting for and organizing paperwork to file your taxes is still fresh, think about doing some financial spring cleaning so next year’s tax preparation won’t be such an ordeal.
    Many people hold onto mounds of receipts and account statements because they’re not sure when it’s safe to toss them.
    (By toss, I mean shred – don’t give identity thieves any ammunition.)
     Here’s when you wouldn’t want to lack proper documentation:
    • If audited by the IRS you must be able to justify deductions, charitable contributions, income, etc.

  • Candidates at the door

    It must be spring – spring in an election year.  The first candidate of the season has beat the hummingbirds to my front doorstep. She is walking my neighborhood, petition and voter registration list in hand, asking for a signature.
    She’s running for the Legislature. What’s her top priority, I ask. Changing the tax law that reduces income tax for rich people – the one enacted when Richardson was governor.  
    Here’s the problem, I say. Before this tax rate change, New Mexico had the highest income tax in the region for the wealthy. Rich people can choose where they live, and will choose states where the tax rates are favorable. States compete for them.

  • Nonsense can be stunning

    Sometimes the amount of dissembling nonsense thrown at us is just stunning. Metaphorically stunning, that is.
    Some Department of Transportation genius decided to cite people supporting pilgrims making the Holy Week walk to El Santuario de Chimayo if the supply stands happen onto highway right-of-way. Safety was the excuse.
    A recent report (“The Economist,” Feb. 18) discussed the Obama administration’s “generous use of ancillary benefits, or ‘co-benefits’” and “private benefits” in proclaiming the bounteous gains from new regulations. The issues cover so-called gains from a regulation directed at something else.

  • Accion helps launch new business

    A new brewery is coming to Albuquerque in June, run by three local beer-loving entrepreneurs. Bosque Brewing is the brainchild of partners Jotham Michnovicz, Kevin Jameson and Gabe Jensen and in their corner is nonprofit lender Accion, which extended a loan of $100,000 to help the partners build a brew house and cover their initial operating expenses.
    The idea for the brewery started two years ago, before any of the partners had ever made a batch of home brew, Jameson said. The three were united by longtime friendships, one family tie — Michnovicz and Jenson are cousins — and membership in the same church. All three attended New Mexico State University in Las Cruces.

  • Gov. slipping out of VP stakes

    SANTA FE – Considerable discussion still revolves around Gov. Susana Martinez as a running mate for the GOP presidential nominee. But most of that discussion is now occurring in New Mexico.
    Gov. Martinez still seems to be making good moves. She is following the Republican playbook but isn’t causing the fuss that many other newly elected Republican governors are.
    Martinez got some good publicity in Arizona recently when she graciously greeted President Barack Obama at the Roswell airport on the way to an appearance at Maljamar.

  • Watch the water grab case

    Newly appointed State Engineer Scott Verhines just made his first big decision, denying an application to Augustin Plains Ranch in its standoff with federal and state agencies, counties, ditch companies, environmentalists, locals, and tribes.
    It’s a case all of New Mexico should be watching.
    West of Datil in Catron County, promoters want to drill 37 wells 20 inches across and 3,500 feet deep, and pump 54,000 acre-feet of water a year for 300 years. That’s a breathtaking amount of water – enough to supply half of Albuquerque’s needs. In fact, the Rio Grande Valley would be the market.

  • Future not bleak on energy front

    Harold Morgan’s article entitled PNM turns profitable is interesting and thought provoking. It’s good news hearing that PNMis  profitable again.
    Harold aptly pointed out the technical, environmental and political difficulties when supplying enough electricity for the wants/needs of New Mexico’s population, service, manufacturing and agricultural industries. Obviously PNM and its investors deserve profits.
    Historical DOW indexes reveal that share values and profits for most major energy-producers are cyclic, rising and falling by as much as 80 percent.

  • A peep of a cottontail

    There’s an old joke about a farm boy who sneaks into the chicken coop one night and paints all the eggs different bright colors.
     The next morning when the rooster walks in, he sees all the colored eggs.  The rooster promptly storms outside the coop and kills the peacock.
    Easter is a fascinating holiday, full of tradition, folklore and calories.  Despite its religious significance, its history is entrenched in myth and ritual, the most prominent of course being a Harvey-like rabbit that sneaks into your house at night to leave chocolate and eggs for your kids.  
    Kind of like that creepy old guy up north who knows when they’re sleeping, knows when they’re awake.