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Columns

  • How mountain top renewal is a good idea

    Recently I received the following email: “Please explain how energy from mountain top removal, fracking and tar sands makes America great.”
    The email sent by someone named Greg used terms that represent three different energy sources: coal, natural gas and oil — and each have been big contributors to America’s progress and prosperity.
    Mountain top removal is a coal-mining method. It is safer than underground mining because it virtually removes the risk of mine accidents. In fact, in the mountainous regions of eastern Kentucky and West Virginia, this surface mining process allows for hospitals, housing developments, schools and shopping centers to be built — which brings much needed economic development and jobs. The area is filled with hills and valleys — but no place to create a community.
    The coal provides, and has provided, America with low-cost, base-load electricity — which has given us a competitive edge in the global marketplace and unmatched personal progress. And, therefore, energy from mountain top removal makes America great.

  • Preparing pets for possible disaster

    Disaster can strike anywhere at any time, and the best way to survive is to be prepared early.
    “Hurricane season begins June 1 and is a great time to review your personal preparedness plan,” said Dr. Wesley Bissett, director of the Texas A&M Veterinary Emergency Team. “While you make sure all of your family members are covered in the event of a disaster, make sure the four-legged members of your family are included in the planning process.”
    It’s important to remember that if you have to evacuate your home, you will often have to do so very quickly. Know ahead of time the route you will take, and identify potential shelter locations along the route. Make sure you know which shelters will accommodate pets, or if there are designated shelters for evacuated animals nearby.

  • Children of the NRA

    Do you remember the last time you bit your tongue?  When you do bite your tongue, you can’t seem to stop biting it. You start focusing on the pain and consciously trying to avoid chewing on it, and in doing so, you find that you almost can’t help biting it again. It’s like the bitten area has swollen to the size of a grape and it’s impossible for you to close your mouth without clamping down on it.
    It’s human nature to zero in on that which most offends us, and in doing so we give its existence a strange sort of credence.
    Enter one of the strangest and most annoying grapes, Wayne LaPierre, spokesperson for those who can’t muster enough hatred and stupidity on their own, and so they hire someone to do it for them.
    LaPierre calls the NRA “the world’s largest civil rights organization in the world.” This is like calling the Al Qaeda the world’s most successful social awareness program. But criticism never seems to hurt LaPierre’s feelings. He doesn’t have enough of a brain stem to support a headache.
    When some gun-toting moron shot up the Newtown Elementary School, the NRA and its supporters immediately blamed gun laws for the murders and gun sales went through the roof.
    Ah, but guns don’t kill people! Only bad guys with guns kill people, right?

  • Rule changes tighten reverse mortgage eligibility

    Reverse mortgages have become increasingly popular in recent years, as cash-strapped seniors seek ways to keep pace with rising expenses — not to mention cope with the pummeling their retirement savings took during the Great Recession.
    But the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) noticed that borrowers increasingly have been opting to withdraw most or all of their home equity at closing, leaving little or nothing for future needs. Consequently, by mid-2012 nearly 10 percent of reverse mortgage holders were in default and at risk of foreclosure because they couldn’t pay their taxes and insurance.
    That’s why Congress authorized HUD to tighten FHA reverse mortgage requirements in order to: encourage homeowners to tap their equity more slowly, better ensure that borrowers can afford their loan’s fees and other financial obligations and strengthen the mortgage insurance fund from which loans are drawn.
    Here are the key changes:
    Most reverse mortgage borrowers can now withdraw no more than 60 percent of their total loan during the first year. Previously, borrowers could tap the entire amount on day one — a recipe for future financial disaster for those with limited means.

  • Be a visionary business leader

    Planning in business isn’t just a matter of deciding how to assign capital and resources to create a profitable venture. Equally essential is developing a distance vision.
    The most effective business leaders are planners and visionaries with creative, dynamic and specific ideas about where they want their company to be three years or five years from now. Their focus is “macro” and “micro.” They zoom in and out, from the specific to the general and back again, absorbing information about their own company and the larger environment the industry and the economy in which the company operates.
    This autofocus helps the visionary leader identify trends that are likely to translate into opportunities and to act with intention to pursue them.
    Forming a picture
    Some visionary leaders are born, but most are made. They learn from the mistakes and successes of other business leaders.
    The visionary process begins with the entrepreneur developing a mental picture — a hologram — of her company several years in the future. She imagines how technological innovations might affect the business in positive and negative ways and what tomorrow’s target market will look and act like.

  • Title insurance discounts expanded for homeowners who refinance

    The Superintendent of Insurance last week signed an order expanding enhanced title insurance discounts to every homeowner who refinances a mortgage in New Mexico. The discounts were advocated for by Think New Mexico, the independent statewide think tank that successfully championed a reform to the state’s title insurance laws in 2009. The enhanced discounts are scheduled to take effect on July 1.
    Title insurance, which is required by banks before they will approve or refinance a mortgage, is one of the largest elements of a homebuyer’s upfront closing costs.
    Before 2009, the prices homeowners paid for title insurance when they refinanced their mortgages were set by regulation by the Insurance Division. A policy purchased with a mortgage refinancing received a discount because the homeowner had already purchased a title insurance policy for the property when he or she originally bought it.

  • Dump government dependence nonsense, honor scientists, military

    When it comes to our public policy conversation, we have slurped our rhetorical Kool-Aid for a long, long time. We hustle the federal government for money while saying we should build the private sector while saying bad things about the government impact on the state.
    For example, a few days ago President Barack Obama designated about 500,000 acres near Las Cruces as a national monument, to applause from Sens. Martin Heinrich and Tom Udall. Much of the land, though I’m not sure how much, is already federal and therefore hardly unregulated. Heinrich and Udall, good statists that they are, wanted the even tighter restrictions that would come with creating a wilderness area.
    This is unequivocally good because, according to an economic impact study, “the national monument will generate $7.4 million in new economic activity annually and create 88 new jobs,” said the New Mexico Green Chamber of Commerce last year.
    No word on the ranchers who having been using the land.
    With the new monument, we see Heinrich and Udall nurturing the federal dollar. The anguish greeting the Senate retirements of Pete Domenici and Jeff Bingaman is recent on the scale of our relationship with federal money.

  • Green across the border

    The Greener Side is in a pre-fab metal building that looks something like a failed truckers’ pornstop, just off the interstate outside Pueblo, Colo. There’s no billboard and only the adjacent greenhouse, surrounded by a chain-link fence topped with strands of barbed wire, tips off the astute shopper that this is the first legal retailer of “recreational” marijuana north of Uruguay.
    Half the cars in the parking lot are from out of state, mostly from Oklahoma, Texas and Kansas. A security guard swipes my New Mexico license through a card reader, confirming that I’m legally eligible to buy up to one-quarter ounce of marijuana for my personal use, and I join the line of customers inside.
    With its cheap paneling and hard plastic chairs, the tiny anteroom resembles a cut-rate dentist’s waiting room, but the atmosphere is much more cheerful. For about half the customers this is a first-time experience, and everybody is studying the menu on the wall and discussing the pros and cons of the various strains on offer.

  • Web presence begins with a strong marketing strategy

    Building a business website is much like any other construction project: The better the foundation, the better the results — and the savings in time and money.
    While laying the groundwork for an online debut, the business owner should consider how a website furthers the overall marketing strategy and how much of a website presence is needed to accomplish the company’s goals. A simple, highly navigable website with key information is essential when starting out. If the foundation is laid correctly, the website can expand as the company grows.
    Many businesses overextend themselves by trying to be full-service sites. Delivering multiple web-based services — a blog, a chat helpline or an online store — requires a substantial commitment of human and financial resources. If that commitment isn’t there, customers will know, and their frustration can create the perception — founded or not — that the business’ services are as unreliable as its website.
    That’s why it’s important to create a web strategy that flows from the business and marketing plans of the company. Potential clients don’t just visit a company’s website to get hours and offerings. They check to see if the business has its act together.

  • Treatments for bone cancer in dogs

    Osteosarcoma (OSA), the most common bone cancer, represents about 85 percent of bone tumors in dogs.
    These aggressive tumors spread rapidly and once diagnosed, should be taken very seriously.
    “OSA commonly affects the limbs of large or giant breed dogs, but can also occur in other parts of the skeleton, such as the skull, ribs, vertebrae and pelvis,” said Dr. Rita Ho, veterinary intern instructor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.
    Animals with limb osteosarcoma typically show signs of swelling at the affected side and associated lameness, depending upon the animal’s unique condition and tumor location.
    The tumors typically form at or near growth plates, and occasionally, the animal will exhibit a growth on their body, or painful inflammation near the site of the tumor. If swelling does exist, it is likely due to extension of the tumor into the surrounding tissues.