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Columns

  • The laboratorys complex transformation

    You can have questions if you want about what Los Alamos National Laboratory should or should not be doing workwise, but they do deserve credit this past couple of weeks in inviting the community to take a look at its newest, and biggest, project.We have argued for some time that the lab has a story to tell – and in many ways it is a good story.

  • The laboratory's 'complex transformation'

    You can have questions if you want about what Los Alamos National Laboratory should or should not be doing workwise, but they do deserve credit this past couple of weeks in inviting the community to take a look at its newest, and biggest, project.We have argued for some time that the lab has a story to tell – and in many ways it is a good story.

  • Adapting to world-wide customer service

    If New Mexico newspapers are to compete in a tech world that has changed the rules of the competitive game, they need to adapt.No more calling your local columnist the old fashioned way. Remember? You dial. He answers. You converse. That is so yesterday.To lead my colleagues into the new age of communication and customer service, this column is establishing a modern system with agents in a far land trained to give immediate and courteous service to its readers.Here’s what you can expect when you dial my number.“Hello.

  • Fried Light: A bucket to the stars

    In Michael Kandel’s satiric short story, “Space Opera,” which is written as a libretto for a science fiction opera, the curtain rises in a provincial spaceport on the Planet Creeth orbiting the sun Alpha Cygni.The opera’s hero, Bobby “Rocket” DeVries, and his fellow grease monkeys are banging the dents out of a rickety space junker, singing “Let’s return this old bucket to the stars,” to the din of their hammer blows.Then Bobby’s friend Fred runs in with the news that Darg Bahr, the governor of the astero

  • Medical Minute: What is a hospitalist?

    Since the initiation of the hospitalist program at Los Alamos Medical Center, I have often been asked, “What is a hospitalist?” As the lead hospitalist of the program, I would like to provide you with answers to the questions I hear most frequently.

    What is a hospitalist?

  • What happened to Mr. Cuddle Bear?

    You think back of the great couples, their linked identities warming our hearts.

  • Not a lot of hope in this week’s news

    Some Congressional candidates in New Mexico filed the required campaign financial reports. Some did not.

    There are a lot of candidates in all three districts as all of the incumbents are running for Senate.

  • A new widescreen TV is not so complex

    Trying to figure out the economy is just something you don’t want to attempt unless you are a trained journalist like this humble correspondent. World finances can be baffling to even the brightest minds.There are a lot of television experts who are employed to analyze the economy. They say the following:Things could get better. Or they could get worse. We are not sure. One thing these analysts know is that their own personal economy is in pretty good shape because they get paid a lot of money not to have a handle on what is going on.

  • Big bucks battle as candidates fight on

    Anyone who does not think that money rules our election process need go no further than this year’s election.According to the Associated Press, Barack Obama raised $7.2 million and Hillary Rodham Clinton pulled in $6.4 million in the days following Super Tuesday.This is in addition to the $32 million for Obama and $13.5 million for Clinton in January.These are stunning totals, reflecting the fact that public office today is not for the common man.As the election goes on and debate rages over who has what, indeed, whatever the current ba

  • Candidates' reliance on more insurance won't solve the health-care crisis

    In the midst of the presidential primaries, voters may wonder how to distinguish among the contenders on the critical health-care issue.All the top-tier candidates favor selling more private insurance, which misses the crisis faced by millions. Just ask Gina Dooley of Albuquerque.“I found out when I was 36 weeks pregnant that my unborn daughter had a lung tumor,” she said. “With this advance knowledge of the care and attention we would need, we did a lot of research and had a lot of contact with our insurance company.