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Columns

  • A tough task indeed

    There is no doubt that Governor-elect Susana Martinez faces a difficult
    task. Not only does she have to put together an administration to operate (and hopefully improve) New Mexico’s sprawling government, she now faces a $450 million deficit that must be dealt with in the next legislative
    session.
    Making the situation even more difficult is the fact that Martinez, during the campaign, seemingly
    removed 60 percent of New Mexico’s budget from belt-tightening. Of course, that was based on

  • American Relief and Recovery Act may have new meaning

    You can’t accuse anybody of exploiting
    the world-famous church in Las Trampas
    for gain.
    In front of the church is a dirt parking
    area, and across the way is a small, funky
    shop, with “La Tienda” painted by hand
    over the doorway, where you can find
    modestly priced pottery, odd-looking
    wood sculptures that are a Pueblo version
    of kachina figures, and cold drinks
    that you can serve yourself from an old
    refrigerator.
    Some folks walk in and ask the shop owner if there is a

  • A tough task indeed

    There is no doubt that Governor-elect Susana Martinez faces a difficult task. Not only does she have to put together an administration to operate (and hopefully improve) New Mexico’s sprawling government, she now faces a $450 million deficit that must be dealt with in the next legislative session.

  • Who hid the deficit?

    What did I tell you? My column written for Oct. 4, announced a $450 million budget deficit. At the time, the Legislature was predicting a $260 million deficit.
    No, I wasn’t part of Gov. Bill Richardson’s “hide the ball” conspiracy that Gov.-Elect Susana Martinez alleges.
    My not-so-secret information came from watching the ebb and flow of  deficit projections during the past two years.
    Even one year ago, Martinez was still chasing drug cartels and her advisers were still back in Washington, D.C. So how were they to know?

  • Control of Internet at issue involving net neutrality

    In an economy with too few jobs to offer displaced workers, some have taken a deep breath and started a home business. Others are employed by companies with home-based worker programs.
    These folks are the fastest growing segment of the economy, and they don’t get enough respect, says Community Economics Lab, a consulting firm that has a pilot program in Los Lunas. Its goal is to find ways to support home-based workers.

  • Healthy Unhappy Meals

    Every time I think society has hit rock bottom, someone proves me wrong.  
    Last month it was the law makers of San Francisco.  They proposed a city ordinance that would force McDonald’s restaurants to add fruit and vegetables in their Happy Meals boxes.  
    The ordinance focuses on McDonald’s strategy of including toys in the meal boxes, which the city claims is an unfair inducement for children to eat unhealthy food.

  • A new ‘START’ for women all around the world

    The so-called New START, the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty with Russia, is poised for an historic ratification vote in the Senate this year. Three more major international treaties are also lined up on President Obama’s ratification to-do list: the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea, and CEDAW, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women.
    CEDAW is a landmark international agreement that affirms principles of fundamental human rights and equality for women and girls around the world.

  • A tough task indeed

    There is no doubt that Governor-elect Susana Martinez faces a difficult task. Not only does she have to put together an administration to operate (and hopefully improve) New Mexico’s sprawling government, she now faces a $450 million deficit that must be dealt with in the next legislative session.

  • Transition of power musing

    As the gubernatorial transition from Bill Richardson to Susana Martinez moves forward, a few observations appear appropriate.
    One suggestion has come to the IdeasForNewMexico@swcp.com e-mail address unveiled in my last column. It’s a good one and is exactly the sort of problem, well known to people on the ground, that doesn’t trickle to the netherworld of the transition.

  • Governor's legacy: Progress or pals

    In June the New Mexico Film Museum closed after a short, unproductive life. It was a cost-cutting measure, said the Governor’s Office.
    The museum rarely offered a program and had no operating budget. It did pay its directors, each one politically connected, rather well ($80,000 a year for the last two). There was a flap in 2007, when the governor attempted to appoint former Secretary of State Rebecca Vigil-Giron as director, because she had no relevant experience. But none of the museum’s directors had any film experience.
    And so it went.