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Columns

  • This post is powerful

    Ray Powell’s winning campaign to “clean up the State Land Office” paralleled Susana Martinez’s winning campaign to clean up Santa Fe.
    Outgoing State Land Commissioner Pat Lyons groused, like the outgoing chief executive, that the candidate was campaigning against him and not the opponent.
    True on both counts.
    The campaign for state land commissioner, largely overshadowed by drama higher on the ballot, deserved more attention because it’s probably New Mexico’s second most powerful position.

  • More hits than misses

     New Mexico voters did their usual good job separating the wheat from the chaff when it came to the questions at the end of the November ballot.
    Predictably, they gave a sound thrashing to two constitutional amendments designed to give politicians a longer leash. They gave our veterans a couple more breaks. And they sent a message to our higher education system that it is getting out of hand.

  • 'Give me liberty or give me death!'

    No man thinks more highly than I do of the patriotism, as well as abilities, of the very worthy gentlemen who have just addressed the house. But different men often see the same subject in different lights; and, therefore, I hope it will not be thought disrespectful to those gentlemen if, entertaining as I do opinions of a character very opposite to theirs, I shall speak forth my sentiments freely and without reserve. This is no time for ceremony. The question before the house is one of awful moment to this country.

  • Bingaman honors veterans

    Each Veterans Day is a solemn occasion when we, as a nation, reflect and show gratitude to those who have served or are currently serving in our military and the families who support them. On this Veterans Day, I’d especially like to thank New Mexico’s veterans for their commitment to protect our country and its interests. New Mexico has a long and proud history of military service, and we are honored to have many living testaments to American bravery in our state.

  • Not an indictment against Richardson? ... not much

    Shortly after Susanna Martinez overwhelmingly became the first Hispanic female elected governor in our nation’s history, the current Hispanic governor claimed his fingerprints were not found on the weapon.
    In the wake of Martinez’ eight-point win (54 to 46 percent) over Lt. Gov. Dianne Denish, Gov. Bill Richardson told reporters in Santa Fe that Election Day wasn’t an “indictment” of his years as governor.

  • Look in the right place

    My friend and I are discussing the legacy of Gov. Bill Richardson.
    Aside from all the controversies, what did he really do for New Mexico?
    “He finally got education reformed,” my friend says. “Replaced the old state school board with a cabinet secretary so there would be accountability.  Freed up money from the permanent fund so there would be money to improve pay for teachers. Got full-day kindergarten and pre-K. These ideas had been around for years and there was a huge coalition in support. Richardson got it done.”

  • Composting rarely enters one’s mind

    When you think of ways to reduce the amount of waste you generate,  you probably think about recycling, and using more reusable items, but people rarely think about composting.  
    Composting is one of the major Los Alamos County initiatives in the community-wide effort to reduce waste and create a more sustainable community.  In fact, on an annual basis composting results in the diversion of around 3,000 tons, which is more than double the average tons recycled through the curbside recycling program.  

  • Hybrid business format appeals to new owners

    Many businesses new to the game choose to organize as a limited liability company, or LLC — a hybrid of a partnership and corporation that attempts to reap the benefits of both.
    The owners in an LLC are called members and each member holds a membership interest — similar to stock or shares — in the company.
    These membership interests are sometimes broken down into units.

  • Bipartisan leadership wins

    The Republican tide that swept the nation made New Mexico about as Republican as it has been since the Great Depression.
    We’ve had several Republican governors during that period and once or twice Republicans have captured one of the other statewide offices. But this is the first time a Republican has been elected secretary of state since Jesusita Perrault held the office in 1930.

  • Resetting state government

    The election is pretty much done as I write the weekend before the final day of voting. But not knowing the identity of our new governor doesn’t matter for the immediate purpose.
    The campaign ended with neither Susana Martinez nor Diane Denish having provided detailed, substantive ideas for solutions to the state government’s revenue/spending saga.