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Columns

  • Tax time help available

    Nobody likes being nagged, but I’m going to risk reader displeasure by reminding everyone that there are hefty financial consequences if you owe income taxes and do not file a return on time – or at least request a filing extension.
    Ordinarily, the federal income tax deadline is April 15; but this year the IRS has granted a reprieve until April 18. Nevertheless, here’s why procrastinating is a bad idea:

  • Loans for legacy; equity for growth

    Anyone looking for a business investor must examine their personal goals before looking for funding – different reasons for starting a business mean different ways of finding money.
    Venture capitalists classify entrepreneurial businesses into two groups: growth businesses and lifestyle, or legacy, businesses. Only growth businesses will be attractive to venture-capital firms.

  • Short circuiting the process

    Little girls in flamenco costumes filled a ladies room in the state capitol one day last week, primping before they danced in the rotunda, a gentle appeal to preserve funding for arts and culture.
    These diminutive, ruffled lobbyists are one of many such waves coursing through the Roundhouse, all with a message. They’re the backdrop to a lot of political theater and explain, in part, the meltdown we saw last week in the house and its precedent-setting outcome.

  • Government labor problems: Not just Wisconsin’s anymore

    While we’ve been wrapped up in a 60-day legislative session that has included a variety of important policy issues, most notably on education reform, New Mexico policymakers, media and the public have watched in detachment the ongoing government labor standoff now happening in Wisconsin. 

  • Android Adorations Anonymous

    The alarm clock is screaming and once again you fall out of bed, the cold floor reminding you that your eyes may be closed but you are unfortunately awake.  
    It’s morning and a pile of unprocessed paperwork is anxiously waiting for you at the office, or perhaps a hot stove, or maybe a quiet machine shop — soon to become quite noisy.  
    It’s a work day and as they say — some one’s gotta make the donuts!

  • Why I need a building permit

    Why do I need a building permit? On the face of it, it certainly seems like a pain in the neck. After all, you only want to replace a window or replace part of the roofing. Really, what’s the point? Well the point is – water and keeping it out! But it goes further than that…

  • System failings on display

    The failings of America’s public education system are, I suppose, clearly on display in Wisconsin.
    In recent weeks that state’s governor, Scott Walker, has found himself embroiled in a battle that, given the merits of the case, seems to fly in the face of common sense.
    Wisconsin, like New Mexico, like Illinois, like California, like Indiana – ay yi yi, we could go on, yes? – is basically broke. In the red. Still, thousands of public employees have stormed its capitol in Madison and demanded more.

  • Spaceport champions are gone

    New Mexico’s spaceport was not conceived as an operation to take rich people into space.
    The Las Cruces community and New Mexico State University began working more than 20 years ago to create a commercial spaceport that would take advantage of the area’s many benefits.
    Those advantages included good weather, high elevation, clear airspace, a strong NMSU science department and the proximity to White Sands Missile Range.

  • Money Watch: Think twice before tapping retirement

    Before the housing crisis, it wasn’t uncommon for people to raid their home-equity piggybanks to pay off bills. Plummeting home values and tougher lending standards helped curb that practice, leading some people to engage in a far more disturbing habit: borrowing or withdrawing money from their retirement accounts to cope with financial hardship.
    There may be times when a loan or withdrawal from an IRA or 401(k) plan is your best or only option, but you should be aware of the possible impacts to your taxes and long-term savings objectives before raiding your nest egg.

  • Taking a simple approach

    During the recent weather crisis, when schools were shut to save energy, several school districts were stuck going ahead with school board and bond elections. The voter turnout was as low as you guessed it would be.
    It’s past time to change the way we run school elections in New Mexico. If we think systematically, perhaps we can solve several problems at once, increase voter participation, and save taxpayer money.