.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • Sweet and sour science

    I remember the first time I had sweet and sour pork.  It was New York City and the meat was soaked in that sugary vinegar sauce, guaranteed to hide the flavor of pretty much anything you wanted to cook.  
    My friends and I were delighted with an endless variety of food names we had never seen before; Moo shu, bean curd, chicken cooked by some military dude named Tso, and of course the sweet and sour.  It was all very delicious, but I’m not really sure what the meats were.

  • Civility still greases the wheels

    Here’s a word legislative Democrats and Republicans use for each other quite often, one you won’t see often in the press: collegial.
    You might think a legislative session is only one step above Jello wrestling, but you’d be wrong. The language is civil, even courtly: “Gentle lady from Chavez… Gentleman from Cibola…”

  • Cancer survivor lives life

    I’ve tried to be normal for more than two years now and I just can’t do it. To you, I may look normal, sound normal, smile when I should and argue when I shouldn’t, but behind the facade is a person who’s acting out a role.
    Why? Because cancer changes your life. Normal went out the window.
    If you’ve ever been in an oncology clinic, you probably have seen that poem, taped to the wall, about what cancer cannot do: “It cannot rob you of your smile, it cannot steal your hope …,” and it’s very true.

  • Time to pull that trigger

    There have been so many “defining moments” in our nation’s history – every election today, for example, is proclaimed such – the term is more cliche than truth.
    Our war for independence was obviously a defining moment – not solely for our country, but for the world, as it turned out. The Civil War – the election of Lincoln and the anti-slavery voice countering the growing power of the South.
    Two world wars. The civil rights movement. We send a man to the moon. Those were genuinely defining moments.

  • State budget ripples through economies and communities

    We complain that they aren’t competent. But now we have reason to worry that there aren’t enough of them.
    Government employees, that is ­— specifically, the front-line regulators who are charged with keeping us safe and keeping our institutions honest. This is an effect of the looming cuts in the state budget.

  • Geography can be unfair

    Recently I had an opportunity to visit with a gentleman from Catron County. The topic was what is happening in his part of the world.
    “Some ranching,” my informant said. The saw mills are gone, thanks to the spotted owl and the environmentalists.
    Subdivisions are the other development, he said. Some attract older people. Subdivisions are fine, he said, but he wonders about an older person building a Catron County home. Health care availability is modest, a problem he knows well, being equipped with a small oxygen tank.

  • U.S. less prepared for quake

    Geology has surely been in the news lately, with the price of petroleum moving relentlessly upward, a threat to global economic recovery because oil is so central to industrial society the world around.
    But now matters are suddenly worse.

  • Snarling in politics

    Why are so many high profile politicos so ill-tempered these days? Is it in the job description: Politico, be unpleasant? Whatever the case, you encounter this snapping and sniping wherever you turn.
    In New Mexico, Gov. Susana Martinez routinely bristles at the slightest hint of criticism.
    In a recent op-ed piece, Martinez’s predecessor, Bill Richardson, suggested that the nation’s governors, Martinez included, might want to think twice before abandoning tax incentives for movie production in their states.

  • A roundabout approach to stupid

    The dim light in the morning made it difficult for me to see her at first, but as it turned out, it wasn’t the light that was dim.  
    She was walking down the side of the road, with the traffic.  She could have used the sidewalk, but I suppose she figured the baby carriage she was pushing would help cushion the blow in the event a car happened to hit her.

  • Coverage may lack key elements

    Keeping home and automobile insurance policies up to date couldn’t be more important .
    You might not have the coverage you think you have. Your insurance policy may have changed and you might not be aware of the changes.  Prices of items in the home as well as the home value might also have changed.  
    Let me introduce the concept of endorsements, which are defined as: a clause in an insurance policy detailing an exemption from or change in coverage.   Endorsements are often part of the state law.