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Columns

  • New year, new time for new business plan

    Writing a business plan is a daunting process to many entrepreneurs, but one that will help find financing and keep a new or existing business on budget and on schedule for growth and development. And it’s worth it — studies show that business owners without a formal plan are three times more likely to close their doors.

  • Happy New Year folks

    I was my mother’s third child and her third son.  I never did understand why parents care so much about the gender of their newborns, but my mother sure did and the entire hospital wing knew it.  
    As the story was told to me, she literally threw a tantrum, throwing things and crying that she had wanted a girl. The nurses even put a pink bracelet on me in an attempt to calm her down.

  • Start slowly with a few dollars each month

    If you dread making New Year’s resolutions because you’re afraid you’ll fall short, take heart: One minor setback doesn’t mean having to write off the rest of the year.
    You’ll probably have more success if you start out with small steps and gain momentum as you go, whether it’s losing weight, lowering debt or boosting retirement savings.
    If your goal is to improve your personal finances, here are a few ideas to get you started:

  • Our economy is flawed

    Finally, we almost have a new governor. Finally, also, we know the number of New Mexicans, 2,059,179 residing in the state as of April 1, 2010, plus another 8,094 living outside the country.
    We know the state’s rate of population increase, 13.2 percent during the past decade, was half the rate of the 1990 to 2000 decade.
    A good guess, if the Census Bureau’s between-census estimates are anywhere near correct, is that most of our population growth came from making babies. New Mexico holds much less appeal for grownups than do Arizona and Colorado.

  • Elections 2010: An expensive slurry of repeated slams

    On her retirement, a friend dedicated herself to public service and has since served on boards and run for office a few times. In the recent election, she lost her race for county commission.
    “My opponent spent $95,000. $95,000! For county commission! I raised $6,000 from my savings and by asking everyone I knew for money,” she said.
    For the lesser offices, she wonders, how does an ordinary person finance a campaign? Apparently all that cash flowing into races at the top of the ticket also flowed downhill to the well connected.

  • Martinez taps Johnsonians

    New Mexico is about to get a new governor, but if the people assisting her are any indication, the emerging Republican administration of Susanna Martinez just might bear a noticeable resemblance to the administration of the state’s out-going GOP governor eight years ago, Gary Johnson.
    If there was anything consistent about Martinez’s campaign this year, it was her call for voters to kick the “Ins” out.

  • Better ways to stimulate economy

    Republicans played President Obama in the tax deal like mortgage hustlers played homeowners. Focus on the teaser rates, borrow more than you need and trust us to work with you to refinance later when rates jump.

  • You heard me ... be a Scrooge!

    Back in high school, I could barely put a verb and noun together without hurting myself.  That is, me not was two good very in the English.  Okay, maybe not quite that bad, but I did have trouble keeping my grades up in the low C’s.  (I hope my students aren’t reading this!)

  • Celebrating 60 years at UNM School of Law

    In June 1950, the first class graduated from the University of New Mexico School of Law, its 27 graduates spreading across the state and establishing a tradition of service to New Mexico that remains strong today. Through the next 60 years, UNM law graduates have represented their communities in the state Legislature, ascended to the top levels of the state judiciary and led the state’s most prestigious law firms.

  • Hollywood’s Old West still here

    The Old West of Billy the Kid is still with us. And so is Hollywood’s Old West.
    The governor has been entertaining the idea of a pardon for the Kid since 2003, and the Legislature considered a pardon before that. The descendents of Sheriff Pat Garrett, who killed the kid in 1881, have made their opposition clear.
    In 2001, historian Bob Boze Bell and I took opposing positions on the question in side-by-side newspaper columns. Bell made a case for forgiveness; I argued that Billy was a rustler, horse thief and back shooter, not a misunderstood youth.