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Columns

  • Budget crimps visionary purchases

    In 1920, two ranchers completed a dam on the Cimarron River and created Eagle Nest Lake, jewel of the Moreno Valley. By 1990, the Lake’s private owners, the Davis family, wanted to sell. They had generously allowed public use of the lake, but they were ready to shed the responsibility.
    Of course, they had no shortage of offers – every resort and condo developer in the region beat a path to their door – but they preferred to sell it to the state to ensure the public’s continued access.

  • Navigating the financial minefields in your marriage

    As with all challenges in a marriage, often what starts as a small issue can fester and grow into a large problem, given enough time.
    It’s not surprising that after being together a few years, some couples realize that the financial quirks they initially found amusing or simply ignored in their spouse now dominate their marital disagreements.
    In fact, money issues tend to top the reasons for divorce.

  • Whatever happened to radio?

    When was the last time you tried to get a weather report in a storm while driving?
    The medium that used to be universal and accessible to everybody doesn’t work any more.
    That is, the radio in your car: the moving vehicle where your safety is most directly affected by weather.
    Nowadays, most radio is a local medium only during weekday morning and evening commuter hours. The rest of the day it’s nationally syndicated. You could be driving straight toward a blizzard, and nobody would interrupt the programming to warn you.

  • EPA CO2 declaration hot air

    The spirited defense of Climate Science publication credibility (Chick Keller,  Monitor Guest Column, July 13) requires reading the PNAS paper by Andregg et. al., creating a Black List of investigators not to be consulted on Anthropogenic Climate Change issues in order to ensure credible expert opinion.  Bias?  For purposes of the following,  I’m not qualified in Climate Science but I do have a Toxicology ticket and I have stayed at a Holiday Inn Express.

  • Cancer survivor rethinks beliefs

    Before I got cancer, I didn’t even believe in taking vitamins, let alone any ‘alternate stuff.’
    I mean who needs them if you eat properly.
    I used to think ‘Boy, you New Age people are weird. What’s wrong with eating good healthy food, keeping fit and taking whatever the doctor orders?’
    Problem is, while all that conventional cancer medicine is draining out of your system, the wake of destruction it leaves behind does not.

  • Devastating budget cuts coming

    Now the fun part begins. Former state Rep. John Mershon of Alamogordo isn’t with us anymore but that’s what the conservative finance chairman would say right now as state lawmakers begin to wrestle with devastating budget cuts.
    Two years ago lawmakers implemented the easy cuts, raiding our hefty reserves, removing unused money from capital outlay projects and searching out hidden slush funds throughout state government.
    Last year, it got more serious.
    A hiring freeze began reducing the number of state employees.

  • 7 billion and (still) counting

    Looking back at my own education, I was far from a perfect student.
    So many lessons went unheeded, dusty stacks of knowledge pushed aside so that I could watch cartoons on Saturday morning.  I seem to recall thinking that the Barbary Wars had something to do with fighting over hair styles.
    One lesson that I do remember however was a “Fruit Fly Experiment” we performed in biology class.

  • Everybody can participate in sustainability in Los Alamos

    Tom Nagawiecki

  • Burning Our Own Fuels

    The Gulf oil spill has shown us just one of the downsides of petroleum.
    That makes the mind of even a geologist like me turn to several questions about the future.
    Could we Americans grow more of our own fuel – enough to run a number of our cars, trucks and airplanes?
    And, quite importantly, could we do so without displacing food crops like corn?
    Pretty much everybody from all sorts of political persuasions is interested in those issues.

  • Candidates build warchest

    Lt. Gov. Diane Denish spent seven years building a $2 million war chest. It scared all Democratic candidates and the two major Republican possibilities out of the race, giving her what appeared to be an insurmountable lead.
    Then along came Susana Martinez who raised $2 million in the past 10 weeks to basically wipe out her fundraising disadvantage.
    How did she do it? Close to half of it was out-of-state money, mostly from four big donors. Even Bill Richardson would have trouble raising that much that quickly from within the state.