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Columns

  • Time to pull that trigger

    There have been so many “defining moments” in our nation’s history – every election today, for example, is proclaimed such – the term is more cliche than truth.
    Our war for independence was obviously a defining moment – not solely for our country, but for the world, as it turned out. The Civil War – the election of Lincoln and the anti-slavery voice countering the growing power of the South.
    Two world wars. The civil rights movement. We send a man to the moon. Those were genuinely defining moments.

  • State budget ripples through economies and communities

    We complain that they aren’t competent. But now we have reason to worry that there aren’t enough of them.
    Government employees, that is ­— specifically, the front-line regulators who are charged with keeping us safe and keeping our institutions honest. This is an effect of the looming cuts in the state budget.

  • Geography can be unfair

    Recently I had an opportunity to visit with a gentleman from Catron County. The topic was what is happening in his part of the world.
    “Some ranching,” my informant said. The saw mills are gone, thanks to the spotted owl and the environmentalists.
    Subdivisions are the other development, he said. Some attract older people. Subdivisions are fine, he said, but he wonders about an older person building a Catron County home. Health care availability is modest, a problem he knows well, being equipped with a small oxygen tank.

  • U.S. less prepared for quake

    Geology has surely been in the news lately, with the price of petroleum moving relentlessly upward, a threat to global economic recovery because oil is so central to industrial society the world around.
    But now matters are suddenly worse.

  • Snarling in politics

    Why are so many high profile politicos so ill-tempered these days? Is it in the job description: Politico, be unpleasant? Whatever the case, you encounter this snapping and sniping wherever you turn.
    In New Mexico, Gov. Susana Martinez routinely bristles at the slightest hint of criticism.
    In a recent op-ed piece, Martinez’s predecessor, Bill Richardson, suggested that the nation’s governors, Martinez included, might want to think twice before abandoning tax incentives for movie production in their states.

  • A roundabout approach to stupid

    The dim light in the morning made it difficult for me to see her at first, but as it turned out, it wasn’t the light that was dim.  
    She was walking down the side of the road, with the traffic.  She could have used the sidewalk, but I suppose she figured the baby carriage she was pushing would help cushion the blow in the event a car happened to hit her.

  • Coverage may lack key elements

    Keeping home and automobile insurance policies up to date couldn’t be more important .
    You might not have the coverage you think you have. Your insurance policy may have changed and you might not be aware of the changes.  Prices of items in the home as well as the home value might also have changed.  
    Let me introduce the concept of endorsements, which are defined as: a clause in an insurance policy detailing an exemption from or change in coverage.   Endorsements are often part of the state law.

  • Tax time help available

    Nobody likes being nagged, but I’m going to risk reader displeasure by reminding everyone that there are hefty financial consequences if you owe income taxes and do not file a return on time – or at least request a filing extension.
    Ordinarily, the federal income tax deadline is April 15; but this year the IRS has granted a reprieve until April 18. Nevertheless, here’s why procrastinating is a bad idea:

  • Loans for legacy; equity for growth

    Anyone looking for a business investor must examine their personal goals before looking for funding – different reasons for starting a business mean different ways of finding money.
    Venture capitalists classify entrepreneurial businesses into two groups: growth businesses and lifestyle, or legacy, businesses. Only growth businesses will be attractive to venture-capital firms.

  • Short circuiting the process

    Little girls in flamenco costumes filled a ladies room in the state capitol one day last week, primping before they danced in the rotunda, a gentle appeal to preserve funding for arts and culture.
    These diminutive, ruffled lobbyists are one of many such waves coursing through the Roundhouse, all with a message. They’re the backdrop to a lot of political theater and explain, in part, the meltdown we saw last week in the house and its precedent-setting outcome.