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Columns

  • Addressing the source

    There’s been a lot of discussion lately about roundabouts, most of it lambasting the county council for galactic stupidity and financial irresponsibility.  
    But I’m here to fight for the other side. Yes, I’m going to argue for roundabouts!  
    I’ve decided that they are a very viable solution. We need to increase throughput and we need to calm people down.
    Any sensible person would agree with the council that Trinity Drive is a death zone, more dangerous than the streets of Fallujah.  
    You take your life in your hands when you come within 20 miles of it.  It’s only a matter of time before the government declares Trinity a disaster area and hires Arizonian lawmakers to build a wall around it.

  • Keep Trinity Drive four lanes

    Sept. 6, 7 p.m., at the community building the county council will make a final vote on changing Trinity Drive to two lanes with nine roundabouts.  
    The cost is estimated at $40 million!  
    Please attend  this vital meeting.

    Phyllis B. Holland
    Los Alamos

     

  • Spirit is my sixth sense

    September is ovarian cancer awareness month, and, as a survivor, it always reminds me that life is definitely a journey.
    Most of us forget to value what we find most precious, and many just get lost in the day to day humdrum of the 24 hour cycle.
    Sometimes it just takes a good day to re-find our spirit. But other times it takes a miracle.
    It had been a tough couple of years. I often joked that when our container of possessions came over to the states from England in January 2001, a giant mirror must have broken on the ship, because it definitely felt like we were getting a lot of bad luck.

  • It's an ugly climate

    Nothing much, bad or good, seems to be happening in the New Mexico economy.
    For the past few months the state has been bumping along.
    The big bad exception is Las Cruces, which has dropped firmly back into recession and job loss. Maybe we’re ending the long slide.
    The job creation index of the Gallup polling firm, released Aug. 19, shows New Mexico tied for 45 out of 51 with three states, California, the epitome of state policies gone wrong; the near bankrupt Rhode Island; and New Hampshire.
    Ugly company. (See www.capiolreportnm.blogspot.com for an explanation of the Gallup survey.)
    Our neighbors fare better, as is usual with state economic performance rankings.

  • Managing epidemics: an argument against blanket job cuts

    The unvaccinated woman got on a plane in London. She flew to Washington, D.C., changed planes and flew to Denver, then on to Albuquerque, and from there drove home to Santa Fe.  She had measles.  
    During the trip, she exposed other passengers from all over the world to this disease.
    Preventing an epidemic involved 70 countries and four states, and cost $1 million, according to Dr. Chad Smelser, an epidemiologist with the New Mexico Department of Health.
    A few other thought-provoking highlights from a recent presentation by Smelser:

  • Jet served a purpose

    There is just something about a jet…
    The governor won headlines for selling the “ultimate symbol of waste and excess,” an executive jet purchased by her predecessor, for less than half its purchase price.
    It was an unwise acquisition in the first place, and its fire sale during a recession is questionable, but hey, we’re talking symbols here.
    As a corporate public relations person in the 1970s, it was my responsibility to explain the Lear jet purchased and used by executives of PNM, the state’s biggest utility.
    Management saw it as a tool. Long before cell phones and laptops, their frequent trips east to raise money meant they were difficult to reach, and the prevailing concern was to minimize their time away.

  • Bullying cries for community attention

    Ours is not the perfect little town. For all the amazing reasons that make this a great place to raise kids, we must not disregard that there is bullying in our schools.
    Bullying is a form of aggression in which one or more children intentionally intimidate, harass or harm another child who is perceived as being unable to defend himself.
    There is the aggressor, the victim and the bystander. The bully usually comes from an unfortunate place that is often chaotic with poorly set boundaries and expectations. The bully is unhappy about something or does not know how to get along with other kids.

  • Mixed agendas drive county government

    What motivates the actions and decisions of our county council?
    Councils change every two years.  I served on four and worked with six others.  
    Interactions among any seven people will be different.  But common themes run through most councils.
    The first and official motivation, of course, is the best interest of the citizens the council represents and serves.  
    There will be legitimate and healthy differences of opinion over what that best interest is.  
    Elected legislators everywhere are frequently torn between doing what their constituents want (representation) and what they think best (leadership).   

  • That's entertainment!

    Whatever happened to good comedy, or drama, or mystery?  
    Did all the talented script writers have their jobs outsourced to sheep herders living in a yurt out in the Russian tundra?  
    A cursory glance at television schedules today can serve you well if you happen to need a colonoscopy test prep.
    First of all, let’s admit that we all love useless contraptions.  
    You know, like that USB-enabled combination shower head coffee filter you got for Christmas?  
    Or that solar powered meat thermometer.  And what about all the attention from women we now get ever since we started spray painting our heads with Ronco’s bald spot remover?

  • Some folks always seem to land on their feet

    Is the media piling on Jerome Block, Jr. and the Public Regulation Commission? That’s what PRC commissioner Ben Hall says. He notes that in America people are presumed innocent until proven guilty.
    Granted, a day seldom goes by without a new charge against Block making headlines. First I will note that all media are very careful to use words like alleged, charged and faces when talking about accused lawbreakers. It allows company lawyers to sleep better at night.
    There has been one recent exception. For a brief period between jobs, former state public safety chief Darren White was the crime reporter for an Albuquerque television channel.