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Today's News

  • Community Calendar 5-18-16

    TODAY
    Juvenile Justice Advisory Board meeting 6 p.m. in building 1, Camino Entrada Road, Pajarito Cliffs Site. Carie Fanning will speak about Family Strength Networks and the Parenting with Love and Logic classes. The public is welcome to attend.

    Chamber Breakfast at 7:30 a.m. in room 230, building 2 at UNM-LA, 4000 University Drive. Speaker New Mexico Cabinet Secretary for Aging and Long Term Services Myles Copeland will talk about employees who are distracted by the demands of also being a caregiver for an aging family member. 



    THURSDAY
    Los Alamos Faith & Science Forum winter series at 6:30 p.m. at Hall at Kelly Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church. Topic will be “What Makes Us Human?” A video/presentation begins at 6 p.m. followed by a large group discussion at 6:30 p.m., then an optional, informal small group discussion. Attendees can bring dinner. All are welcome. Follow the blog at lafsf.org.
    FRIDAY
    Plaque dedication ceremony honoring the recent addition of the U.S. Post Office in downtown Los Alamos to the National and State Register of Historic Places at 3:30 p.m. near the entrance to the post office. After remarks, the plaques will be unveiled and refreshments will be served.
    SATURDAY

  • Oppenheimer Scholarship winners announced

    Twelve college-bound high school students from Northern New Mexico have been selected for scholarships administered by the J. Robert Oppenheimer Memorial Committee.
    The students are from Los Alamos, Pojoaque Valley and Santa Fe high schools.
    The JROMC has awarded over 200 scholarships and other awards totaling more than $420,000 since the program was begun in 1984. The philanthropic organization’s scholarship program is supported by several limited-term endowments, numerous small, individual donations, and major contributions from the Los Alamos National Bank.
    The J. Robert Oppenheimer Memorial Committee is dedicated to preserving the legacy of Robert Oppenheimer, the first director of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one of the most influential scientists of the 20th century.
    This year’s selected students from Los Alamos High School are:
    Jovan Zhang: J. Robert Oppenheimer Memorial Scholarship supported by the committee, awarded to a student for outstanding promise in science and mathematics.
    Katherine Wang: J. Robert Oppenheimer Scholarship in Memory of Mary and Harold Argo, awarded to a young woman for outstanding promise in the arts or sciences.

  • Science on Tap set for Thursday

    Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Climate and Ecosystem Science Team director Cathy Wilson will speak Thursday at Science On Tap, at 5:30 p.m. at UnQuarked Wine Room, 145 Central Park Square.
    Wilson is working to better understand what happens when warming climate causes Arctic permafrost to thaw. As the ground warms up, previously frozen soil carbon is decomposed and released as green house gases – adding to global warming. But, in turn, warmer temperatures drive more plant growth and carbon uptake from the atmosphere. This might offset permafrost carbon emissions, but by how much?
    Come and learn about the complex interactions that take place in these normally frozen reaches of our planet.
    Science On Tap is sponsored by the Los Alamos Creative District and hosted by the Bradbury Science Museum. The On Tap series begins each evening with an informal 10-15 minute lecture followed by a lively group discussion. All ages are welcome. The “On Tap” series happens twice a month. The discussions are supported by Bradbury Science Museum, Fuller Lodge Art Center, Los Alamos Historical Society and PEEC at The Nature Center.

  • Assets in Action: Reading is important over the summer

    Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious, it’s May!
    That’s right, anything between now and May 31 that comes across as ridiculous or awkward in the form of a question, an attitude, a lapse in goal accomplishment or general insanity, the answer is it’s May.
    I would like for everyone within eyeshot to try and enjoy the next two weeks and find positivity somewhere throughout the day.
    If I don’t address it again before the final school bell rings, reading over the summer is so important. Los Alamos Middle School Librarian Lisa LaPrairie-Whitacre taught me when she was still the Chamisa Elementary Librarian the equal importance of listening to books on tape too.
    So recently while spending way too much time in a car, I went to our public libraries and checked out several audiobooks to learn more about various people that might seem fun or inspirational.
    The first book on CD I checked out was, Dick Van Dyke’s “Keep Moving and other Tips and Truths about Aging.” It is read by the author and was quite a treat to enjoy. I think kids and adults need to hear stories of being knocked down, picking themselves up and going forward.
    Many of our national and local treasures for that matter have so much wisdom to share if we just take the time to listen.

  • Comparing cities’ appeal for ‘successful aging’

    As the oldest Baby Boomers turn 70, there is an opportunity to compare among cities the factors in successful aging. Disclosure: The Baby Boomer group includes me.
    The analysis comes from the Milken Institute (milkeninstitute.org) of California.
    While Milken talks of aging, boomers in the audience need to admit something obvious and un-boomerlike; 70 is old. So is 68, which is Hillary Clinton’s age. Donald Trump is 69. This old-people-for-president bit is the weirdest part of this very weird presidential year. But I digress.
    Milken provides two lists, one ranking large cities, one ranking small cities. The title is “Best Cities for Successful Aging.”
    Of the 100 large cities, Albuquerque places 67th. Among the 252 small cities, Santa Fe is 76th; Las Cruces, 140th; and Farmington, 169th.
    Cold places rank highest for aging. Madison, Wisconsin, is best large city. Iowa City, Iowa, 177 miles away, leads the small. Both are state-university cities, home to, respectively, the University of Wisconsin and University of Iowa. Both are in the Big Ten. All coincidental, I presume. Weather gets the biggest weight among the general factors. Other than drinking, weather is Madison’s worst rank. Madison and Iowa City must do well on other factors.

  • Wildfire-fighters warn 2016 could be bad

    California could face a dangerous and difficult wildfire season in 2016 despite a relatively wet winter, federal officials warned Tuesday.
    Most of the rest of the nation is expected to see an average summer, but even that means thousands of wildfires, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said after a briefing from the U.S. Forest Service, which is part of his department.
    A five-year drought has left 40 million dead and dried-out trees in California, including 29 million that died last year alone, Vilsack said.
    “This creates a tremendous hazard, potential hazard, for fires and firefighting this year,” he said.
    An El Niño weather pattern brought near-normal snowfall to parts of California last winter, but its forests need much more rain and snow to recover fully from the drought, Vilsack said.
    Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell said Southern California didn’t benefit from the El Niño as much as the state’s northern mountains.
    He said the effects of drought will continue to kill California’s trees for at least three more years.
    Tidwell and Vilsack said the Forest Service — the primary federal wildfire-fighting agency — has 10,000 firefighters ready nationwide, along with more than 350 aircraft and 900 fire trucks.

  • Hilltopper girls take second at state track meet

    ALBUQUERQUE— Thirteen Hilltopper girls got to step on the podium at the Class 5A state track and field championships, helping Los Alamos finish second as a team.
    “It was an amazing weekend,” Los Alamos girls’ head coach Paul Anderson said. “The girls far exceeded expectations and did everything that was possible in order to win the runner-up trophy. We went in to the meet as 40-point underdogs and finished only nine points out of first.”
    Los Alamos scored 69 points to take second while Piedra Vista won with 78. Los Lunas (36), Roswell (33) and St. Pius X (30) rounded out the top five.
    Eight Hilltopper boys also stepped on the podium as the Los Alamos boys’ team finished 13th with 18 team points. Albuquerque Academy won the boys’ title with 55.5 points, followed by Farmington (52), Lovington (51), Piedra Vista (32) and Belen (31).
    Besides bringing home a red team trophy, the Hilltopper girls also scored some gold, silver, bronze and other-colored medals at the state meet.
    The Hilltopper girls had two first-place finishes, both in relays.
    Los Alamos won the 4x100-meter relay and the 1600-medley relay, scoring 10 points apiece for the girls.
    In the first race Saturday, the 4x100, Los Alamos set the tone for the rest of the day.

  • Better ways to ‘pull together’ for our kids

    BY VERONICA C. GARCIA
    Executive Director, New Mexico Voices for Children

  • Pet Talk: Blind dogs are just as loveable and playful as dogs with sight

    Some dogs are born blind while others develop blindness over time from age and disease. No matter the situation, blind dogs are just as loveable and playful as dogs with excellent eyesight. Dr. Lucien Vallone, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, cleared up some confusion about caring for blind dogs.
    “Blind dogs are certainly adoptable,” Vallone said. “In fact, most blind dogs’ owners actually report that their dog’s quality of life is excellent. In addition, many owners find that blind dogs become more attached to either the owner or other pets within the household, which is often viewed positively. After adapting to a new environment, which can take several months, most blind dogs lead lives that are almost identical to sighted dogs.”

  • Shelter Report 5-15-16

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are noon – 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturday, and noon–3 p.m. Sunday.
    Be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting, and donating. You can also check out our Petfinder website for pictures of our adorable adoptable animals: petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html.
    BUNNIES
    While the Los Alamos animal shelter does not typically take bunnies, a small bunny was dropped off a little while ago and went immediately into foster care. Little Bunny is a cute little black bunny that has been litter box trained and is allowed to roam free in the house. She gets along well with another male bunny in the house, but the female bunny is very jealous. Little Bunny is very friendly, especially when she’s hungry, and will sit in a lap for an hour or so at a time. She loves romaine lettuce, carrots, hay, and rabbit food!
    CATS