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Today's News

  • UNM medical students serve Los Alamos residents

    ALBUQUERQUE – Three University of New Mexico School of Medicine students completed their first year in medical school this summer by helping Los Alamos residents with their health and wellness through mid-August at two sites in Los Alamos that include a family medicine clinic and medical center.
    More than 100 first-year UNM medical students began their six-week rural rotation this month in 22-plus communities throughout New Mexico, from Las Vegas to Las Cruces; Gallup to Clovis.
    As part of their nationally recognized curriculum, the students are talking with patients, conducting physical examinations with their preceptors, and performing a community project designed to address specific community health care and/or educational needs.
    Through the UNM School of Medicine’s Practical Immersion Experience (PIE), medical students are placed in outlying primary care practices — predominantly family medicine practices, but also internal medicine practices and occasionally rural emergency rooms — to experience medical practice in New Mexico’s rural communities.

  • News For Retirees 08-24-14

    Aug. 24-30, 2014
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.
    Betty Ehart
    MONDAY
    8:45 a.m. Cardio
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Chicken Caesar salad
    12:15 p.m. AARP Smart Driver course
    7 p.m. Ballroom dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m. Variety training
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Hot dog
    1 p.m. MindBody massage
    1:30 p.m. “Friends” meeting
    7 p.m. Bridge
    7:30 p.m. Table tennis
    WEDNESDAY
    8:30 a.m. LAVA Quilters
    8:45 a.m. Cardio Plus Exercise
    10:45 a.m. Music with Ruth
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Pork roast
    Noon Lunch talk: Guest from Aging & Disability Resource Center
    1:30 p.m. Daytime Duplicate Bridge
    THURSDAY
    8:30 a.m. Walk-in-the-woods
    8:45 a.m. Variety training
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Tilapia
    1:30 p.m. Beginning tap dancing
    2 p.m. Ballroom dancing
    6:30 p.m. Chess
    7 p.m. Bridge
    FRIDAY
    9:15 a.m. Line Dancing
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Spaghetti and meatballs
    12:30 p.m. Movie: “From Russia with Love,” 1963
    1-4 p.m. Shuffleboard

  • Gun Show packs them in

    Sponsored by the Los Alamos Sportsman’s Club, the 2014 Gun Show has a new venue — the Knights of Columbus, 104 D.P. Road.
    And on Saturday morning, the show already was packed.
    Firearm vendors and enthusiasts in the community and from across the state were welcome to buy, sell, swap and browse. Firearm ammo and accessories were also available.
    The show, which started Saturday, will run from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. today. General admission is $5 and children 12 and under are free. Passes for both days are $8 for adults and youth ages 12-18 are $3.
    All federal, state and local firearm ordinances and laws must be obeyed.
    For the previous 17 years, the Gun Show was at the Pueblo Complex, but last year’s event was touched by controversy when Los Alamos resident Nancy Schick opposed the use of school property for gun sales, although the Pueblo Complex is no longer a school — it is still owned by Los Alamos Public Schools.
    Schick, a former teacher at Los Alamos High School, cited the rash of gun violence in schools as one of the reasons for her opposition.
    Pueblo Complex is leased out for venues from various organizations throughout the year.

  • New nuke pit report released

    Jonathan Medalia, a specialist in nuclear weapons policy with the
    Congressional Research Service in Washington, has issued another report in regards to manufacturing nuclear weapons pits.
    It’s called “A Decision making approach for Congress” and the Los Alamos National Laboratory is front and center in the report.
    Medalia starts off with a little history. First off, a “pit” is the plutonium “trigger” of a thermonuclear weapon.
    During the Cold War, the Rocky Flats Plant (Colorado) made up to 2,000 pits per year (ppy), but ceased operations in 1989. Since then,the Department of Energy (DOE) has made at most 11 ppy for the stockpile, yet the Department of Defense stated that it needs DOE to have a capacity of 50 to 80 ppy to extend the life of certain weapons and for other purposes.
    Medalia’s report focuses on 80 ppy, the upper end of this range.
    And he explains what options are out there.

  • Robots come out in full force

    Several robotics teams from Los Alamos gathered at the Bradbury Science Museum on Friday to show off their handmade robots. In attendance were Project Y from Los Alamos High School, FIRST Robotics team from UNM-LA, FIRST Lego Atomic Phoenixes, FIRST Tech Challenge from Los Alamos Middle School and the Radioactive Fireflies. 

  • Pajarito Mountain takes stage at LTAB

    Pajarito Mountain took center stage at Tuesday’s Lodgers’ Tax Advisory Board meeting.
    Stacy Glaser, marketing director for Sipapu Ski Resort/ Pajarito Recreation LP, provided an update on efforts to finalize the partnership with Los Alamos County and open for skiing and snowboarding this winter.
    Contract negotiations are ongoing, but Glaser reported that all parties are committed to the effort.
    “We fully anticipate that by ski season the contract will be in effect,” Glaser said.
    Besides negotiations, Pajarito’s primary effort has been obtaining water for snowmaking.
    The U.S. Forest Service is holding a public meeting at 6 p.m. Monday at Trinity on the Hill concerning Pajarito Recreation’s application for a temporary pipeline to run water from the Los Alamos Reservoir to the ski area.
    “This is a temporary solution. This is something that we could do for 12 months,” Glaser said.
    “This would essentially buy us some time to investigate more permanent solutions.”
    The county has offered Pajarito 5 million gallons of free water, which must be siphoned off the reservoir in order to dredge it.

  • Update 08-24-14

    Lecture

    Authors Speak Series: T. Jackson King. 7 p.m. Thursday at the upstairs rotunda of the Mesa Public Library. King will talk about his books, which include a wide range of genres in the realm of science fiction, fantasy and horror.

    Concert

    Pianist Nathan Salazar and Santa Fe Opera apprentice artist Benjamin Sieverding in recital. 2:30 p.m. Sunday at Crossroads Bible Church. Tickets $10 adults and $5 children available at the door.

    County Council

    The Los Alamos County Council will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday in council chambers at the Muncipal Building.

    Rotary Club

    Noon Tuesday at the Manhattan Project restaurant. Speaker will be Paulette Frankl, author of “Marcel and Me.”

    Viewing party

    “Manhattan” TV series, viewing party and discussion. 7-9:30 p.m. today at Time Out Pizzeria on Central Ave.  

  • Episode 4 of ‘Manhattan’ discussed

    The Los Alamos Historical Society wants to thank the community for their continued interest and support of discussions of WGN’s TV series “Manhattan.” Here are some of the common questions we heard at the discussion of the fourth episode this past Sunday and on social media. Every week the society will be updating a bulletin board in the museum to continue exploring questions and reactions as the 13-episode series continues. Previous episodes are discussed on the website, losalamoshistory.org, on our Facebook page, and in the museum.
    Join the Los Alamos Historical Society Sundays at Time Out Pizzeria in Los Alamos from 7-9:30 for a viewing and discussion of “Manhattan” (TV-14 rating).
    Were Los Alamos doctors Army doctors?
    Yes, Los Alamos was served by an Army hospital. Originally staffed by one doctor and three nurses, the hospital grew to include a radiologist, pediatrician, dentists, an internist who had to enlist in the Army to accept the invitation to join the staff, a pharmacist, lab technicians, more nurses, and an Great Dane/Russian wolfhound mutt named Timoshenko who looked after the front steps.
    Where did they test explosives?
    Explosives tests were carried out at sites on current LANL property, such as the Gun Site. These sites were only a few miles away from the Tech Area.

  • Cone Zone 08-24-14

     Pavement Preservation Work in White Rock:
    As part of the pavement preservation effort, chip seal operations are underway on several streets in White Rock. Streets that will be chip sealed include Hamlin Court, Pruitt, Paige Loop and Paige Court. Residents on the affected streets have been notified and will receive 48-hour notice before construction begins on their street. During this work, residential access as well as delivery and emergency access will be maintained. Traffic control will include lane closures, flagging operations, and short term delays. Expect loose chips (small gravel) on these streets when work is occurring.
    Central Avenue Improvements Project:
    The contractor is reporting that pedestrians are crossing into the work zone instead of at the provided crossings; this is extremely dangerous and pedestrians are advised to use the provided pathways.
    Central Avenue continues to be fully closed between 15th Street and the Post Office driveway. Access to the Post Office will be maintained. Vehicles will be detoured to Deacon Street and the Main Street driveway into Central Park Square is also closed.

  • Grazing options examined

    Representatives from Santa Fe National Forest, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Range Improvement Task Force, and the New Mexico Cattle Growers Association met with dozens of local ranchers earlier this week discuss ways to sustain trans-generational grazing operations in the Jemez Mountains while protecting habitat for the endangered New Mexico meadow jumping mouse.
    This meeting was the continuation of a conversation initiated by Congressman Ben Ray Lujan last week to discuss collaborative solutions.
    “I was pleased by the discussion and the willingness of the ranching community to attend and improve our understanding of their concerns. I heard many good ideas that we intend to investigate more in an attempt to find a practical solution that can meet the needs of the ranching community and provide for protection of the mouse,” said Maria T. Garcia, Forest Supervisor.
    The Forest Service is mandated by law to protect the endangered New Mexico meadow jumping mouse and its occupied habitat. The mouse was listed as an endangered species in June.
    The mouse lives in lush riparian areas, and is only active for four months each year where tall grasses provide both food and shelter.