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Today's News

  • Fall prevention workshop Jan 23

    The public is invited to attend the fall prevention workshop “Stay on Your Feet:  Keeping your Balance and Preventing Falls,” a presentation at Aspen Ridge Lodge, located at 1010 Sombrillo Court.

    The presentation will be January 23, given by Robert Lee, PT, DPT, MA and director of LAMC Rehabilitation Services.

    No RSVP is needed to attend. Refreshments will be served on third floor of Aspen Ridge.

    For information, contact Cynthia Goldblatt, program manager and liaison, at 695-8981.

  • Community Calendar 1-3-17

    THURSDAY
    Nature on Tap: Recent Discoveries in Astronomy at 5:30 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Join local astronomers to discuss the latest findings in astronomy including gravitational waves and neutron star collisions. Free. More information at peecnature.org.

    LA Community Blood Drive from 11 a.m.-7 p.m. at the First Baptist Church Hall, 2200 Diamond Drive, by United Blood Services. Free.
    FRIDAY
    January Night Sky Show at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Discover and identify constellations and planets visible in our night sky this month, and enjoy their beauty on our planetarium dome. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.

    LA Community Blood Drive from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. at the First Baptist Church Hall, 2200 Diamond Drive, by United Blood Services. Free.
    SATURDAY
    Bird Walk: Los Luceros Historic Site at 6:30 a.m. at the Nature Center. Enjoy this rare and scenic birding opportunity with local expert Joe Fitzgibbon. Cost is $20 for members, $24 for non-members. A portion of your registration fee will be donated to Los Luceros.

    Feature Film: Incoming!
at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. Discover what impacts from above can teach us about the history of our planet, the Solar System, and the Universe! Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.

  • Start off year with Cowboy Breakfast

    Start the New Year with a Cowboy Pancake Breakfast.  The first breakfast of the year will be from 7-11 a.m.  Sunday at the Posse Lodge on North Mesa Road.

    The all-you-can-eat breakfast features a variety of pancakes plus eggs, sausage, bacon, coffee and juice. Adult breakfasts will cost $7, children 10 and under can eat for $4.

    This month, the proceeds from breakfast will benefit the Rotary Club of Los Alamos.

    The Rotary Club, which has been serving the Los Alamos community for over 50 years, plans to use the funds for improvements to the Quemazon Trailhead.

    Other projects supported by the club and the community’s generosity include providing pre-paid exam vouchers for UNM-LA students in the high school equivalency program; the LAHS Memorial Garden; vocational training for Delancey Street residents; transportation to swimming lessons for fourth-graders in the elementary schools; an active inbound and outbound Youth Exchange Student Exchange program and leadership camp for high school students; the Deborah Beene Music Awards; the LAHS Memorial Garden; picnic tables for PEEC; funding support for the Posse Lodge, FIRST Robotics, the Hilltalkers Speech and Debate; LA Makers, Boy Scouts, LA Cares, Family Strengths Network, the Senior Center, and PAC-8 after-school programs for middle-schoolers.

  • 100 workouts
  • Thursday’s Nature on Tap to focus on astronomy discoveries

    This month’s Nature on Tap, set for Thursday, will focus on the latest findings in astronomy, including gravitational waves and neutron star collisions.

    Local astronomers and astrophysicists Dr. Galen Gisler, Dr. Steve Becker and Dr. Paul Arendt, will provide an engaging discussion about gravitational waves, the creation of precious metals, black holes, neutron stars, the night sky and upcoming planetarium shows.

    Nature on Tap is part of a series of conversations about art, history, nature and science. Thursday’s discussion will be at 5:30 p.m. at UnQuarked Wine Room.

    Gisler was born under the dark and starry skies of eastern New Mexico and eventually found his way back to his home state. With a bachelor’s degree in astronomy from Yale University, and a Ph.D in astrophysics from the University of Cambridge (England), Gisler went on to postdoctoral positions at the Leiden University Observatory (Netherlands) and Kitt Peak National Observatory (Arizona).

    Arendt has a Ph.D in physics from Ohio State University. His working career was spent in Applied Research and Development of materials at LANL and also in commercial manufacturing.

  • Assets in Action: Let your voice be heard, before it is too late

    As an actual Certified Prevention Specialist in the State of New Mexico, I would never tell anyone what to think or how to vote. I would, however, say that you shouldn’t be allowed to vote on something drug related unless you do your homework.

    If you are in a position to have an intern, a student, or a volunteer have them research the history of the drug. If other state’s have legalized it, someone should spend a considerable amount of time seeing how decisions have affected their community, and in what ways.

    Recently, I have seen how the news is calling the legalization of marijuana in California as, “California is going green.”

    As a speech communication major, the media literacy aspect is astounding to me. “Going Green,” has an all-natural, healthy connotation to it. I am curious, however, if the going green is all about the financial aspect of legalization?

    Remember we elect officials to be our voice, but it may soon be imperative to let your voice be heard on this issue. If New Mexico decides to legalize marijuana, we won’t have a say after the vote.

  • Save for the lean years  

    BY LISA SHIN
    Guest Editorial

    Recently, one of my patients told me, “They should have saved for the lean years” as we discussed the possible change in LANL management and GRT revenues. She was referring to the Biblical account of Joseph and his rise to power from slavery.

    Pharaoh dreamed of  seven fat cows, devoured by seven starving cows. Then he dreamed of seven ripe, healthy sheaves of wheat, devoured by seven dead, dry ones.   Joseph correctly predicted the meaning of the Pharaoh’s dreams.

    “Immediately ahead are seven years of great abundance in all the land of Egypt. After them will come seven years of famine and all the abundance in the land of Egypt will be forgotten. As the land is ravaged by famine, no trace of the abundance will be left in the land…And let Pharoah take steps to appoint overseers over the land, and organize by taking a fifth part of the land’s produce in the seven years of plenty....Let that food be a reserve for the land for the seven years of famine which will come upon the land of Egypt, so that the land may not perish in the famine.”

    The principle is simple: save during the plenteous years to be ready for the lean years.

  • Ringing in 2018
  • Time to ask: ‘How is UNM athletics paying for itself and helping the university?’

     In 2017, the University of New Mexico got itself a new president, a new athletic director and a new athletic financial officer. They have their work cut out.

    UNM athletics is such a mess that former State Auditor Tim Keller called the athletics department and its fundraising arms “an ungovernable ball of organizations.” A special audit noted nearly $700,000 in missing revenues, perks for insiders, mixing of public and private money, and years of blown budgets.

    What other college sports program has drawn its own investigative journalist and a website devoted to its excesses? For about a year, Daniel Libit and his “NM Fishbowl,” instead of the usual fawning Lobo coverage, has scrutinized the program and demanded accountability. Now Libit, turning to other pursuits, calls on New Mexico journalists to stop acting like stenographers and step up to the plate. College sports should be covered like a public institution and not entertainment, he told the online NM Political Report. Students and taxpayers should hold the department to higher standards.

  • Sheriff candidate files injunction against county

    White claims the county is not following its own charter and ordinances. 

    He said he wants a district court judge to order Los Alamos County to restore its sheriff’s office.  White’s previous attempt to get the New Mexico Supreme Court to get the county it’s decision to defund and the cut the sheriff’s entire staff was rejected. This time, White is taking a different strategy.

    “What I’m asking the court to do is order the county to follow its own charter, follow their own ordinances and follow state statute that specifically says H-class county or home rule municipality,” White said. “I’m not asking the judge to decide constitutional or statutory issue like I did for the Supreme Court.”

    White wants the Los Alamos County Sheriff’s Office restored to where it was before the Los Alamos County Council took away its budget and most of the services it used to perform last year, including process serving. In 2016 the council voted to transfer those services, and the budget it needed to perform them, to the Los Alamos County Police Department.