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Today's News

  • Big fourth inning lifts Isotopes

    Albuquerque’s Brock Peterson doubled the bases clear in the bottom of the fourth, the big blow of the game as the Isotopes downed the Fresno Grizzlies 8-7 Wednesday night.
    The Isotopes had just one on and two out in the fourth inning, but rallied for five runs, which proved to be the difference in that contest.
    The Isotopes (49-56) can win their second straight series with a victory over the Grizzlies tonight in Albuquerque.

  • Senior men's tourney results

    Ken Koch of Los Alamos and his partnern Dan Shannon, of Santa Fe, finished in second place in the July 17 best ball tournament hosted by the Northern New Mexico Senior Men’s Golf Association.
    The NNMSMGA is for men age 50 and over. Association members compete in several tournaments throughout the summer and early fall.
    Koch and Shannon finished with a combined score of 73 at the tournament, played at Pagosa Springs (Colo.) Golf Course. They finished three strokes behind winners Rob Schneider and Bob Sherman.
    In the second flight of that tournament, Los Alamos’ Jim Steedle and Santa Fe’s Harry Rosenbloom finished with the third-lowest net score.

    Here are other the results from recent tournaments for the Northern New Mexico Senior Men’s Golf Association.

    Twin Warriors Golf Course, July 1

    Championship flight

    First low gross: Rob Schneider, Santa Fe, 78.
    Second low gross: Ron Trujillo, Las Vegas, 79.
    First low net: David Woodland, Santa Fe, 69.
    Second low net: Dennis Sanderson, Santa Fe, 71.

    First flight

    First low gross: Ken Koch, Los Alamos, 75.
    Second low gross: David Wintermute, Albuquerque, 81.
    First low net: Mike Porter, Alamosa, Colo., 67.
    Second low net: Dan Shannon, Santa Fe, 70.

    Second flight

  • County rodeo returns Aug. 9

    Los Alamos County Rodeo is returning Aug. 9 and continues through Aug. 10.
    The rodeo is staged at North Mesa at Brewer Arena, beginning at 2 p.m. with bull riding, roping, barrel racing and mutton busting, followed by a cowboy-style dinner and dance at the Posse Lodge at 5 p.m.
    The cowboy dinner includes choice of prime rib or salmon and, for those 10 and under, hot dog and chips.
    The dinner and dance is $15 for adults, or $10 for dance only. Entertainment for the dance will be provided by The Rifters, from 7–11 p.m.
    Proceeds from the dinner and dance benefit the Posse Lodge.
    The Rodeo continues on Sunday, Aug. 10 at 1 p.m. at Brewer Arena.
    Admission to the County Fair and Rodeo is $8 per person, or $25 for a family of four. No credit cards will be accepted for admission. 
    For more information, call Suzette Fox at 661-4844, or visit the county’s recreation devision website, losalamosnm.us/rec.
     

  • Today in history July 24
  • Sinkhole opens on N.M. 4

    Los Alamos Police kept watch over a sinkhole discovered on N.M. 4 between mile markers 59 and 60. According police, utility crews will be on the scene soon to see if they can patch it up, So far, that section of N.M. 4 remainrfopen. Police said it was discovered around 1 p.m.

  • On The Docket 7-23-14

    July 21

    Mark A. Martinez pleaded no contest in Los Alamos Magistrate Court for racing on highways. Defendant incurred no fines but was ordered to pay $81 in court costs. Defendant was also ordered to undergo 30 days of unsupervised probation.

    Probation conditions include:
    Defendant shall notify the court of any change of address within 48 hours. Defendant shall obey all federal, state and local laws. Upon successful completion of deferral conditions charge(s) will be dismissed. Deferral period shall be 30 days. Defendant shall refrain from receiving any other citations during the deferment period. If the defendant fails to comply with the requirements set forth, the deferment agreement shall be forfeited. Deferred fines will be imposed and citation(s) will be reported to the Department of Motor Vehicles accordingly. A bench warrant may be issued for the defendant’s arrest.
    July 22

  • Creedon confirmed as NNSA deputy administrator

    Madelyn Creedon was confirmed by the Senate Wednesday as the Department of Energy’s Principal Deputy Administrator for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).
    “Madelyn Creedon’s confirmation comes at a critical point for the National Nuclear Security Administration,” said Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz. “She is well-prepared for her new role at the Department as it follows a long career of public service in national security, including at the Department of Defense, with the Senate Armed Services Committee, and, previously, at the Department of Energy. NNSA Administrator Klotz and I thank the Senate for their attention to Madelyn’s nomination, and look forward to working with her.”
    As NNSA’s Principal Deputy Administrator, Creedon will support NNSA Administrator Frank Klotz in the management and operation of the NNSA, as well as policy matters across the DOE and NNSA enterprise in support of President Obama’s nuclear security agenda.

  • Update 07-23-14

    Pet adoption

    Mobile pet adoption sponsored by Friends of the Shelter. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday in front of the new Smith’s Marketplace.

    APP meeting

    The Arts in Public Places Advisory Board will meet Thursday. The meeting will start at 5:30 p.m. in council chambers.

    Lecture

    Authors Speak Series. Steven F. Havill. Novelist will discuss recently released “Night Zone, a Posadas County mystery.” 7 p.m. Thursday at the Mesa Public Library Upstairs Rotunda.

    Downtown Dogs

    A weekly walking group for dogs and humans. The walk starts from Pet Pangaea at 6 p.m. on Thursday nights for a stroll around downtown Los Alamos.

    Farmers Market

    County officials announced there would be no councilors’ booth at Thursday’s Farmers Market.

    Friday's concert

    Gordon’s Summer Concert Series presents Ray Wylie Hubbard, with opening act the Bill Hearne Trio. The concert will be at 7 p.m. at Ashley Pond.  

  • Hunger Week, Summit address larger issues

    The Los Alamos County Council joined the New Mexico legislature in declaring July 14−18 as Hunger Week.
    Hunger Week — initiated to raise awareness about hunger throughout the state — coincided with the first End Hunger in New Mexico Summit, sponsored by the North Central New Mexico Economic Development District Non-Metro Area Agency on Aging and the New Mexico Aging and Long-Term Services Department. The summit took place July 17−18.
    “When people think of individuals or families going hungry, they often think of people living in extreme poverty, living in some distant land,” said Tim Armer, Executive Director for the NCNMEDD.
    “It might surprise them that there are many people experiencing hunger right here in New Mexico and most likely right in their own neighborhoods. People can have a house, a car and a job but still struggle with putting food on the table.”
    Here are some statistics about hunger in New Mexico provided by summit organizers.
    • New Mexico is one of the highest states facing food insecurity with at least 40,000 New Mexicans seeking food assistance each week, including many children or senior citizens. Currently New Mexico ranks No. 1 in the nation for childhood hunger and second for senior hunger.

  • Hidden in plain sight: Poverty in LA

    Forbes ranked Los Alamos County the third wealthiest county in the United States this year. The county also has the highest number of millionaires, according to Phoenix Marketing International. Livability.com just named Los Alamos the best small town in the country.
    So it is very hard for most people to believe that poverty exists in the county.
     “I think there is a perception that Los Alamos doesn’t have poverty. In areas of affluence, sometimes the issues of poverty become invisible. And it is true in Los Alamos that the great majority of people are doing rather well,” said Ellen Morris Bond, executive director for Self Help, Inc., a program dedicated to enhancing life skills and empowering individuals by providing programs and services that focus on developing self-reliance.
     “Whenever I do public talks, people are kind of shocked at my reports of what I deal with on the ground here, as an agency that deals with struggling people in Los Alamos almost every day. Every day I hear and see and meet with families that struggle to stay here.”
    Statistics show that 3.9 percent of the county’s population lives in poverty, based on such things as the number of food stamp recipients. And the story does not stop there.