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Today's News

  • Community honors senior volunteers

    On April 17, the Los Alamos Volunteer Association, also known as LAVA celebrated its annual appreciation celebration for its senior volunteers.
    The event, which included food and dancing, was held at the Betty Ehart Senior Center.
    My Blue Heaven performed for the crowd.
    Door prizes were given out, donated by CB Fox, Starbucks and Smith’s. LANB printed out the programs.
    Home Instead partnered with LAVA by doing the postcard invitations and a DVD showing how “Volunteers are changing the face of aging.” They also presented LAVA with a plaque saluting all the volunteers and their contribution of more than 78,370 hours they donated in 2014, which is equal to approximately $1,619,907 worth of service.
    Members of the Los Alamos High School Student Council were on hand to serve food.
    For more than 40 years the senior centers in Los Alamos have had this service to help seniors (age 55-plus) find volunteer work that is just right for them.
    Volunteering is important to an individual, they benefit physically, mentally and emotionally by helping others.
    Nonprofit organizations appreciate the free help and support and everyone benefits.  
    Volunteering certainly can guard against boredom, lonliness and uselessness that aging might bring on.

  • Business accelerators invited to compete for SBA funds

    For the second year in a row, the Small Business Administration is sponsoring a competition to award $50,000 each to 50 business accelerators, incubators, shared tinker spaces and co-working startup communities.
    This time around, Javier Saade, associate administrator for the SBA’s Office of Investment and Innovation, hopes to see more applicants from New Mexico. Only one accelerator in the state competed in 2014 — out of 830 applicants.
    Given that one objective of the program, according to the SBA, is to “fill geographic gaps in the accelerator and entrepreneurial ecosystem space,” New Mexico is just the kind of place the agency would like to spend money from its growth accelerator fund.
    “It is well known that the most successful accelerators to date were founded on the coasts,” according to the SBA. The National Venture Capital Association concurs, reporting that startups in San Francisco, San Jose, New York, Boston and Los Angeles have consistently received the lion’s share of venture capital funding over the past five years.
    The SBA awards are designed to stimulate more capital investment in parts of the country that lack conventional sources of capital and vibrant entrepreneurial networks.
    What they’re looking for

  • Earth Day in Los Alamos County started 45 years ago

    To remember the first Earth Day in Los Alamos County, one must give credit where it is due — the Los Alamos High School Students to Save Our Environment.
    A group of very concerned students answered the call of a teacher and formed a group to determine how to plan for a first Earth Day. They were linking up with the efforts of the newly formed Citizens for Clean Air and Water, a group of citizens and lab scientists who had begun addressing the deadly air pollution from the Four Corners power plants.
    The idea for the First Earth Day arose nationally in the midst of the Vietnam War as the nation’s awareness began to focus on issues, such as the Cuyahoga River in Ohio catching fire from oil slicks, oil spills off the California coast killing sea life and so many other issues raising public consciousness. Gaylord Nelson, Democratic Senator from Wisconsin and Pete McCloskey, a conservative Republic Congressman, joined hands to bring about the first national Earth Day. As the nation began to respond, so did the students.
    LAHS students approached the administrators who readily gave permission to celebrate the first Earth Day. The students formed “teams” on particular topics to research and prepare talks.

  • Lost opportunities in hemp production

    I’m a natural-fiber kind of person. Whenever I can, I prefer to purchase and wear clothing that is 100 percent cotton.  
    I have learned recently about the pollution involved in the growing of my favorite fiber.
    Conventional cotton is filthy. It uses more herbicides and pesticides per acre than most other crops.
    For that reason I was doubly disappointed when Gov. Susana Martinez vetoed the industrial hemp bill.
    Hemp has been demonized in the United States because it is biologically very close to marijuana, but it won’t get anyone high. It’s a useful and amazingly versatile plant. Until it was banned because of its similarity to marijuana, hemp was used all over the world for centuries for an astonishing variety of purposes — food, clothing, paper, building material and, famously, rope.
    Sources agree growing conventional cotton uses as much as 50 percent of all the pesticides consumed in the nation. Hemp grows like a weed. It should be of special interest to New Mexico because it doesn’t need much water.
    Wouldn’t it be useful if New Mexico researchers could help New Mexico farmers know when to use hemp as an alternative crop?
    A massive amount of information is widely available extolling the benefits of hemp and refuting the old bugaboos about its similarity to pot.

  • Lost opportunities in hemp production

    I’m a natural-fiber kind of person. Whenever I can, I prefer to purchase and wear clothing that is 100 percent cotton.  
    I have learned recently about the pollution involved in the growing of my favorite fiber.
    Conventional cotton is filthy. It uses more herbicides and pesticides per acre than most other crops.
    For that reason I was doubly disappointed when Gov. Susana Martinez vetoed the industrial hemp bill.
    Hemp has been demonized in the United States because it is biologically very close to marijuana, but it won’t get anyone high. It’s a useful and amazingly versatile plant. Until it was banned because of its similarity to marijuana, hemp was used all over the world for centuries for an astonishing variety of purposes — food, clothing, paper, building material and, famously, rope.
    Sources agree growing conventional cotton uses as much as 50 percent of all the pesticides consumed in the nation. Hemp grows like a weed. It should be of special interest to New Mexico because it doesn’t need much water.
    Wouldn’t it be useful if New Mexico researchers could help New Mexico farmers know when to use hemp as an alternative crop?
    A massive amount of information is widely available extolling the benefits of hemp and refuting the old bugaboos about its similarity to pot.

  • Wheeler, Adames go deep twice as Isotopes beat Rainiers

    Tim Wheeler and Cristhian Adames each mashed two home runs Tuesday night at Cheney Stadium in Tacoma, Wash., to lead the Albuquerque Isotopes (8-5) to an 8-6 win against the Tacoma Rainiers (4-9) in the opening game of a four-game series.

    Wheeler mashed a grand slam in the first and followed it with a solo shot in the sixth.

    Adames blasted a pair of solo homers in the third and seventh innings.

    Early offense has been the key to Albuquerque wins this season, and Tuesday proved to be no different. Brandon Barnes ripped a leadoff single, and Adames followed with a walk in the top of the first. After two quick outs, Dustin Garneau walked to load the bases. Designated hitterWheeler then blasted a 2-2 pitch over the right field wall, giving Albuquerque a 4-0 lead. The Isotopes tacked on one more run in the third for a 5-0 advantage and never looked back.

  • Runners compete for good cause in annual Run for Her Life

    The fifth annual Run For Her Life 5k and 10k races were held Sunday at East Park.
    In the 5k, the top female was Leanne Smith with a time of 21 minutes, 47 seconds. The first male and overall winner was Daniel Santistevan (20:33).
    The first female finisher in the 10k was Sanna Sevanto (49:50) while Tad Hughes was the top male and fastest finisher overall (48:11).
    All of the proceeds from the races will be donated to breast cancer research.
    Below are the complete results from all of the races in the different age groups:

    Men’s 5k, 19-and-under
    1 —27:35.4, Daniel Chertkov
    2— 52:28.0, Emmitt Tibbitts
    3—52:37.4, Asher Maranenbaum
    4—52:38.1, Aron Maranenbaum
    5—57:50.5, Owen Masser

    Men’s 5k, 20-29
    1—20:33.7, Daniel Santistevan

    Men 5k, 30-39
    1—33:59.1, Daniel Maranienbaum
    2—57:51.4,Thomas Masser

    Men’s 5k, 50-59
    1—28:19.8, George Brooks
    2—30:08.8, William Pyle
    3 —33:54.1, James Harrison

    Men’s 5k, 60-69
    1 — 46:33.8, Ed Martin

  • Hilltopper boys run away with Capital City Invite

    Snow didn’t slow Los Alamos’ track teams down on Saturday in Santa Fe. The Hilltopper boys set 27 personal records (PRs) en route to winning the Capital City Invite with 112.5 team points, almost 45 more than second-place Taos.
    The Hilltopper girls finished second out of 12 teams with 84 points, just two points behind Taos.
    “(Twenty-seven) PRs on the day prove we can get it done even on a cool, breezy day,” Los Alamos boys head coach Larry Baca said.
    “We finished second and the girls competed very well,” girls head coach Paul Anderson said. “It was a good meet coming off of Spring Break and a good tune up going in to the end of the season.”
    Ralph Archbold won the 110-meter high hurdles in 15.97 seconds, just missing the state-qualifying time of 16.20 seconds because of the hand-timer conversion (which rounds the time up to the nearest tenth of a second and then adds .24 seconds).
    Chris Parker won the 300 intermediate hurdles in 42.31 seconds, which was also close to a state-qualifying time.
    The Hilltopper boys also got first-place finishes from Skyler McCall in the high jump (6 feet, 3 inches), Liam Johnson in the pole vault (12-3) and its medley relay team comprised of Miroslav Betts, McCall, Greg Ahlers and Cameron Staples (3:45.20).

  • Today in history April 22
  • Run For Her Life

    Runners take off from the start of fifth annual Run For Her Life Sunday at East Park. The run, which included a 5K and 10K race hosted by the local chapter of Haddasah, is a fundraiser for charities working in the field of breast cancer research.