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Today's News

  • TRAVEL: A journey through history along the Birmingham Civil Rights Trail

    “It began at Bethel.” With these words, historian and educator Dr. Martha Bouyer proceeded to take me back in time to the birth of the Birmingham Civil Rights Movement. “The Movement,” as its members called it, started at Bethel Baptist Church, under the steerage of the church’s fiery pastor, Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth. It was Shuttlesworth who organized the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights (ACMHR) after the State of Alabama declared the NAACP a foreign corporation which could no longer exist. This was in response to the Reverend’s refusal to turn over the names of the local members of the organization.
    To many, Shuttlesworth’s name might be unfamiliar. I was unaware of this man’s contributions to the Civil Rights Movement until I visited Birmingham on an historical tourism trip. Shuttlesworth emerged as a “hidden figure,” who was often shadowed by other such well-known leaders of the time as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Reverend Ralph Abernathy. But, it was Shuttlesworth who initially galvanized the black community with the aim of dismantling the city’s segregation ordinances. He was the spark that created the flame.

  • Wildfire Day set for April 15; vendors needed

    “Wildfire Day” will take place from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. April 15. The Los Alamos Fire Department is seeking vendors interested in providing information about fire mitigation and defensible space services.
    The event is held at Ashley Pond Park and vendors will be located in the Justice Center parking lot.
    Vendors interested in hosting a booth for “Wildfire Day” are asked to contact the Los Alamos Fire Department’s Administrative Office at 662-8317 or send an e-mail to the event coordinator.
    Permit forms will be required; interested vendors can visit this link (losalamosnm.us/cms/one.aspx?pageId=7471419) to download the forms.
    Completed forms and payment for the booth must be received at the Parks, Recreation and Open Space Division Office (located in the Aquatic Center) no later than April 12.

  • New Mexico, Texas seek licenses to store spent nuclear fuel

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — The race for what to do with spent fuel generated by the nation's nuclear power plants is heating up as backers of a plan to build a temporary storage site in New Mexico made the rounds in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday in hopes of gaining support for their proposal.
    Holtec International and a coalition of local leaders from southeastern New Mexico first announced plans two years ago to construct a state-of-the-art, below-ground space for temporarily housing the tons of spent fuel that has been piling up at reactors around the U.S.
    The company recently submitted its application for licensing to the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission, starting what will be a yearslong review process. It will take federal regulators 60 days to determine if the application is complete and then the more in-depth work will begin.
    The agency is already reviewing an application from a West Texas company that treats and disposes of radioactive waste in a remote area not far from the New Mexico border. Waste Control Specialists has proposed storing some 5,000 metric tons of spent fuel.
    Federal officials have long acknowledged that the future of nuclear energy in the U.S. depends on the ability to manage and dispose of used fuel and high-level radioactive waste.

  • Public invited to free prostate cancer seminar

    The Los Alamos Council on Cancer invites the public to a free seminar at 6 p.m. April 13 to learn about prostate cancer.
    The Dr. Peter J. Lindberg Memorial Seminar is presented by Dr. Fabio Almeida, a board member and medical advisor of the Prostate Cancer Research Institute, on current and emerging PET/CT imaging techniques in recurring prostate cancer.
    Dr. James Ziomek, a colleague and friend of Lindberg, will provide introductory comments.
    The seminar will be held at the First Baptist Church, 2200 Trinity Drive in Los Alamos.
    Preceding the speaker, a complimentary, light dinner will begin at 5:15 p.m.  
    Attendees who would like to participate in the dinner are asked to register at LosAlamosCouncilOnCancer.Org, or email the Los Alamos Cooperative extension Service at losalamos@nmsu.edu or phone 662-2656 by Saturday.
    Those not participating in the dinner are asked to register at the same sites.  
    The public is encouraged to join in learning new techniques in the early detection of recurrent prostate cancer and to honor Lindberg for his many years of devoted and compassionate service to our community
    Los Alamos Medical Center is a provider approved through the California Board of Registered Nursing (provider number 15835) and this seminar awards 1.5 (CE) Continuing Education contact hours.

  • Review: ‘In the Mood for Love’ explores cultural shifts of 1962 Hong Kong

    Fidelity and appearances take centerstage in “In the Mood for Love” (2000, rated PG, subtitled), showing at 6:30 p.m. Thursday in Mesa Public Library’s upstairs meeting-room theater.
    The free screening is part of the Mesa Public Library Free Film Series.
    Writer and director Kar-Wai Wong’s internationally award-winning film – including best actor (Tony Chiu-Wai Leung) and technical grand prize at Cannes – delights in the styles and cultural shifts of 1962 Hong Kong, and delights in fomenting questions about loyalty, sexuality, pride and decorum.
    Mrs. Chan (Maggie Cheung) and Mr. Chow (Tony Chiu-Wai Leung) have recently become neighbors in a crowded apartment building. Both of their spouses travel frequently, leaving Chan and Chow to become friends in their absence.
    It doesn’t take long for Chan and Chow to realize that their spouses are often away at the same time, and that they are having an affair.

  • Community Calendar 4-5-17

    TODAY
    The Arts Council will host the April Brown Bag Performance at noon in the Pajarito Room of Fuller Lodge. Piano virtuoso Juanita Madland will present compositions by J.S. Bach, Mozart, Chopin, Schubert, Schumann, Ginastera, and an original piece. This concert will also be presented in Minneapolis in May. This spring Juanita will play her fifth harpsichord concert.
    THURSDAY
    Gardening for Backyard Birds
from 7-8 p.m. at the Nature Center. Learn from Master Gardeners how to invite birds to your yard and garden. Free.
    FRIDAY
    Fish Fry Friday from 5-7 p.m. at Immaculate Heart Mary Parish Hall, 3700 Canyon Road. Cost is $10 for Adults, $7 for children.

    The Jemez Thrift Store will have a bag day from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. today.

    Tour of the Friedman Recycling Facility from 8:30-4 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Tour New Mexico’s state of the art recycling facility. Free. Lunch available for $13 or $14.

    Gentle Walks
at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free.
     
    April Night Sky Show
 from 7-8 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Discover and identify objects visible in our night sky this month, and enjoy their beauty from our planetarium. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
    SATURDAY

  • What does retirement look like if you haven’t saved?

    The picture of retirement that many of us have is a post-work period filled with travel and plenty of relaxation. It’s a time when you can finally take up a new hobby, sink into the pile of books and enjoy more time with family and friends.
    The reality is that many haven’t been able to save enough money to enjoy this idealized retirement. What might their retirement look like?
    You may be working for longer than you expected. Many people undergo a period of “phased retirement” and either reduce their hours or start a new part-time job after retiring from a full-time schedule. Even those who don’t have a financial need may find that they value the activity and connections work brings to their lives. Without savings, continuing to work might not be a choice, but you can still look for fulfilling opportunities.
    Continuing within the same profession part-time or taking on related consulting work could be the most financially rewarding route, if it’s an option. Alternatives such as customer service positions with a retailer are popular among some retirees. There are also Internet-based jobs that allow you to work from home.
    Social Security could be your sole source of income. Retirees who don’t have a pension or savings and stop working may find that Social Security is their only income.

  • Judge Gorsuch rates applause for decisions in Indian Country

    Indian Country, surprisingly, supports the nomination of Neil Gorsuch to the U. S. Supreme Court.
    The Native American Rights Fund and the National Congress of American Indians recently endorsed the nominee. NARF, in case you haven’t heard of it, has been at the forefront of Indian law for nearly a half century.
    “Judge Gorsuch has significantly more experience with Indian law cases than any other recent Supreme Court nominee,” NARF informed tribal leaders recently.
    That high praise and a number of tribal endorsements (including the Navajo Nation), have transformed Gorsuch into something of a hero among Native American rights advocates, but it may be premature.
    During his years on the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals Gorsuch has participated in 39 Indian cases, of which 28 involved significant questions of Indian law.
    Out of those 28 cases, tribal interests won 16, or 57 percent, NARF said.
    The late Justice Antonin Scalia routinely opposed tribal interests, and the rest of the Supremes haven’t been receptive to tribal arguments, so Gorsuch compares favorably.
    Most important to tribes is the concept of tribal sovereignty.
    Tribal sovereignty is one of those concepts that freshman legislators and lawyers new to the Southwest trip over once.

  • On the Docket 4-5-17

    March 6
    Ashley Martinez  pleaded no contest in Los Alamos Municipal Court to speeding 11-15 miles an hour over the speed limit. Defendant’s sentence deferred until June 3. Defendant also sentenced to defensive driving school. Defendant must pay $65 in court costs.

    March 7
    Gordon Runer pleaded no contest in Los Alamos Municipal Court to speeding six to 10 miles an hour over the speed limit and failing to appear in court. Defendant was sentenced to defensive driving school and fined $25.  Defendant’s sentence deferred until May 4. Defendant must also pay $65 in court costs.

    Ruben Griego was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of speeding 16-20 miles an hour over the speed limit. Sentence deferred until May 5. Defendant was also sentenced to defensive driving school. Defendant must also pay $65 in court costs.

    Russell Dupre  was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of careless driving and not having a proper driver’s license. Defendant must pay $65 in court costs. Defendant also sentenced to defensive driving school. Defendant must also pay $130 in defensive driving costs.

  • LAMC deals with OB-GYN shortage

    A temporary shortage of OB-GYNs in Los Alamos County has had some residents wondering about whether they will be covered, and if their Blue Cross, Blue Shield insurance will pay for it.
    Officials with the Los Alamos Medical Center said the public’s needs are being met, and they are working on hiring more OB-GYNs.
    The medical center is also accepting Blue Cross and Blue Shield without any problems. Another local OB-GYN, Dr. Danielle Bridge, a physician that has a private practice in town, also accepts Blue Cross and Blue Shield insurance.
    “We’ve got several providers that are pulling locum duties, which means every day, we have coverage within the hospital. If someone needs to give birth, we have a physician here.” LAMC CEO John Whiteside said. “...We have 24-7 coverage for maternity, that’s our commitment to the community.”
    “Locum” duties means other the providers can step in to provide the duties of an OB-GYN when necessary.
    The physicians are also holding “clinic days,” when women can get checkups.
    “We have every day, through June, covered,” Whiteside said. “Hopefully, we’ll have two providers in here sooner than later.”
    The two will replace OB-GYN Dr. Patrick Dawson, who recently left Los Alamos.