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Today's News

  • Girls soccer falls in state championship game

    The Los Alamos High School varsity girls’ soccer team was perhaps the biggest surprise of the Class 5A state soccer tournament, as the Hilltoppers proved they are among the best teams in the state.

    “I am really pleased with how the team progressed and where we ended up,” said head coach Ann Cernicek.

    No. 6 seed LAHS knocked off No. 3 seed St. Pius X and No. 2 seed Aztec High School on back-to-back days, setting up a rematch with District 2-5A rival, and No. 1 seed, Albuquerque Academy, for the state championship.

    And though the Hilltoppers gave a championship-level effort, it wasn’t quite enough, as the Chargers escaped with a 1-0 victory, and the team’s second consecutive state championship.

    Heading in, there were no surprises between these two teams. The Hilltoppers and Chargers met twice during the regular season, won 3-1 and 3-0, by Academy.

    In the regular season, the recipe for success for Academy was maintaining possession as often as possible and forcing the Hilltoppers to chase the action.

    Early in the championship match, it appeared the Hilltoppers were intent on not allowing this strategy to work a third time.

  • SFNF offices closed Friday for Veterans Day

    All Santa Fe National Forest offices will be closed Friday, in observance of Veterans Day, which honors the service of all who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces. Forest offices will resume regular business hours on Monday.
    Anyone who plans to visit the Santa Fe National Forest over the weekend should know before they go. 
    Check the weather forecast, and be prepared for seasonal fluctuations. Use good judgment and basic safety precautions when hiking, fishing or camping on the SFNF.  Although fire danger has decreased across the SFNF, campfire safety and prevention is always a priority.  Never leave a campfire unattended, and make sure it is out cold before leaving the area.
    For more information, contact the local ranger district or forest headquarters at 438-5300. Follow the SFNF on Twitter (@SantafeNF) and Facebook.

  • Assets in Action: Celebrating Native American Heritage Day

    November is Native American Heritage month. An additional focus takes place the day after Thanksgiving, called Native American Heritage Day.

    Jessica “Jaylyn” Atsye of the Laguna Pueblo began an event in 2010 called Rock Your Mocs Week. This year the week takes place Nov. 12-18. It will be the third year Los Alamos supports the effort by Rockin our Mocs.

    It is a chance for Native Americans, both youth and adults, from all backgrounds, to wear their moccasins for a day or the week and share their pride and culture. The traditional moccasins are as different as the people who will wear them.

    A friend of mine, Deb Minyard from Pojoaque High School, received a pair as a gift when she was the 2015 New Mexico Teacher of the Year. Her student, Nessa, asked if she could give her a handmade pair as a gift. When Minyard accepted, the student measured her feet in the traditional way, by tracing them.

    The handmade moccasins were crafted by Bernard Mora of the Tesuque Pueblo. The beautiful gift brought Minyard to tears, making her feel like a part of the student’s family. Minyard considers the gift one of her most treasured possessions.

  • Fees waived at national forests in honor of veterans

    Fees at many recreation sites and amenities at the Santa Fe National Forest will be waived over Veterans Day weekend on Saturday and Sunday.

    Fees at all national forests and grasslands will be waived at many day-use sites, such as picnic grounds and developed trailheads, in cooperation with other federal agencies under the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act.

    Other agencies also participating in the fee-free days including the National Park Service, Bureau of Land Managements and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

    The fee-free availability includes sites in the Santa Fe National Forest which normally charge day-use fees and campgrounds. Site on the National Reservation System are not fee-free, according to a press release from the Santa Fe National Forest.

    If you plan to visit, “know before you go,” by checking the weather forecast and being prepared for seasonal fluctuations.

    Follow basic safety precautions for hiking, fishing and camping in the national forest.

    Although fire danger is somewhat lower, campfire safety and prevention is always a priority while outdoors, according to the press release.

    Never leave a campfire unattended and make sure it is out and cold before leaving your campsite.

  • American Legion to host dinner, live music; VFW to host ceremony for Veterans Day

    The Los Alamos VFW Post 8874 will hold a Veterans Day Ceremony at 11 a.m. at Ashley Pond to honor veterans Saturday. The special ceremony will include a color guard and trumpet player.

    Following the ceremony, the public is invited to the VFW for a celebration, at 1793 Deacon St., Los Alamos.
    The American Legion Frank G. Frainier Post 90 in Los Alamos is planning a steak dinner and live music night on Veterans Day Saturday.

    Legion members, the public and anyone eligible for membership is welcome for the steak dinner that starts at 4 p.m. in the dining hall at 1325 Trinity Drive, said Commander Linda Fox.

    The dinner costs $15 for a ribeye steak, loaded baked potato, salad, roll, dessert and soft drink. To reserve a dinner, call the American Legion at 662-7772 before 8 p.m. Thursday.

    Following the dinner, members and anyone eligible to join the legion – which includes anyone who was in the military, or parents, or siblings of those in the military – can stay for the live music that starts at 6 p.m. in the bar area.

    Bat Bennett, a well-known musician, will play his special mix of tunes in the bar.

    “People really get involved,” Fox said. “He’s really a very good entertainer.”

  • Honoring veterans through business support

    BY FINANCE NEW MEXICO

    New Mexico is home to more than 160,000 veterans, and about half of them are under the age of 65. For those former service members interested in operating businesses, state and federal agencies can help with business formation, certification and contract acquisition that levels the playing field for vets that have spent their careers out of the private sector.

    Veterans come to the private-sector workforce with a lot to offer, including advanced training in specialized fields such as logistics, security, information technology, personnel management and administration. They understand the complexities of doing business with the U.S. government and the importance of following instructions and protocol.

    They appreciate the need for teamwork and leadership, and they work well under pressure. In other words, veterans have the skills needed to start and manage a business.

    Veteran-specific help

    The Office of Veterans Business Development is the advocacy arm of the U.S. government for veterans in business. Besides acting as an ombudsman, the OVBD provides oversight of federal procurement programs for veteran-owned and service-disabled-veteran-owned small businesses.

  • Op-Ed: Legislators Favor Special Interests over Public Interests

    By Aubrey Dunn, Commissioner of Public Lands

    In an effort to protect one of our country’s largest and most important sources of drinking water, I adopted a policy earlier this year to curtail usage of drinking water from the Ogallala aquifer for oil and gas production, specifically the process of hydraulic fracturing.

    I remain a proponent of hydraulic fracturing for the advances it has allowed in energy development in New Mexico and the increased revenue that it has helped to bring to our state; however, as it relates to the use of our state’s natural resources, I believe in responsible conservation.  

    Subsequently, I have been sued by a State Land Office permittee who has made millions of dollars selling drinking water for oil and gas related activities and I have been publicly vilified by some members of the New Mexico State Legislature.

    The Ogallala is a shallow water table aquifer located beneath the Great Plains with portions in eight states, including eastern New Mexico, and provides nearly all the fresh water for residential, industrial and agricultural use.

  • State Rep. Dennis Roch says he will step down

    CLOVIS (AP) — State Rep. Dennis Roch says he will step down from the New Mexico Legislature after 10 years.

    The Eastern New Mexico News reports the Logan Republican announced Tuesday he will not run for re-election when his term expires on Dec. 31, 2018.

    He said his chief reason for leaving state politics is the imminent birth of his fourth child.

    Roch says he's also facing difficulty in balancing his political career with his duties as superintendent of Logan Municipal Schools.

    Roch worked to pass an array of legislation, including one that rescinds worker's compensation for those injured while under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

  • Sandia Labs looks to boost recruitment of employees

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — The head of Sandia National Laboratories says the research facility has recently made changes aimed at bolstering recruitment and diversifying the workforce.

    Lab director Stephen Younger told members of a state legislative committee on Wednesday that Sandia has dropped its grade point average requirement for non-intern positions.

    Younger says the change adopted in August is part of an effort to look at the whole person, rather than just transcripts or what kind of degree a person might have.

    He says the change opens up the field to prospective workers who might have struggled early in college but went on to earn degrees. He says the lab is looking for people with grit and determination and it plans to work more closely with New Mexico's colleges and universities.

    Sandia is among the state's largest employers with about 12,000 workers.
     

  • New Mexico political corruption trial details private talk

    SANTA FE (AP) — A former top-ranked New Mexico lawmaker told a jury he was confronted in his state Capitol office in 2014 by a senator for interfering with the proposed sale of a state-owned building.

    The sale of the building, over objections of then-House Speaker Ken Martinez, is the focus of a corruption trail in state district court against former Sen. Phil Griego.

    Griego is accused of using his elected office to help collect a $50,000 real estate commission without properly disclosing his involvement. He has pleaded not guilty to charges including bribery, fraud and perjury in a trail that began last week.

    Former House Speaker Ken Martinez testified Wednesday that Griego entered his office alone on April 9, 2014, and asked him, "Why did you screw up my deal?"

    Martinez says he did not initially understand the question about a decision that day by a state buildings commission to delay authorization of the sale of the building in downtown Santa Fe — but he quickly deduced that Griego was representing the intended buyers. Griego would eventually earn a commission of just over $50,000.