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Today's News

  • SB 474 makes health care prices clear

    Health care pricing has been likened to shopping blindfolded in a department store, and then months later receiving an indecipherable statement with a framed box at the bottom that says: pay this amount.
    Indeed, here in New Mexico it is easier to find information about the price and quality of a toaster than of a common medical procedure. Because information about price and quality is essential to almost every market transaction, this lack of transparency means that health care is more expensive than it would otherwise be.
    The high cost of health care has devastating consequences. More than 62 percent of personal bankruptcies in the U.S. are attributable to illness and health care debt, up from 8 percent in 1981. Many of these medical debtors are middle-class homeowners, and more than three-quarters of them have health insurance.
    Health care costs are also a heavy burden on state taxpayers, with more than 27 percent of New Mexico’s annual budget going to health care. As health care spending outpaces the growth of the rest of the economy, it threatens to crowd out spending on other priorities like education.

  • We’re free to follow our passion thanks to farmers, ranchers

    In what categories can you count yourself among “the two percent?”
    I’ll waste this sentence so you can really ponder that question.
    Did agriculture spring to mind? If not, you’ll find this statistic surprising: Less than two percent of Americans are directly involved in production agriculture. In other words, 98 percent of us are disconnected from the farm and ranch in terms of time, physical distance, or both.
    Because we are disconnected from farms and ranches, we are dependent upon them for the things that only they can provide: food, fiber and more. If ever there’s a time to be aware of and appreciate that fact, it is now during National Agriculture Week.
    A century ago, most people produced their own food either entirely or in part — and that was because they had to. But leaps in technology opened upon new ways of tending to farm and ranch work, new ways of sharing knowledge about farming and ranching, new ways to market what they produced. What hasn’t changed is the passion that farmers, ranchers, and others in production agriculture bring to their work.

  • Church listings 3-20-15

    Baha’i Faith
    For information, email losalamosla@gmail.com. For general information, call the Baha’i Faith phone at 1-800-228-6483.
    Bethlehem Lutheran
    Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church, a member of the ELCA, is located at 2390 North Road, 662-5151; see a map at bethluth.com. The Eucharist is celebrated each Sunday at 8:15 a.m. and 11 a.m., with coffee and doughnuts served between services during our Education Hour of classes for all ages. The preaching is biblical by our Pastors Bruce Kuenzel and Nicolé Ferry, the music is lively, children are welcome and abundant, and a well-staffed nursery is provided. All are welcome! Come Join the Family!
    Bryce Ave. Presbyterian
    The church is located at 3333 Bryce Ave. The Rev. Henry Fernandez preaches, bapca.org, info@bapca.org. For information, call 672-3364.
    Calvary Chapel
    Sunday school classes for all ages at 9:15 a.m. At 10:30 a.m., worship and a study of the Biblical Jesus as He relates to people in our look at the Gospel of Exodus.
    The Christian Church
    92 East Road, 662-6468, lachristian.org. 9-10 a.m. Sunday school; 10-10:30 a.m. Coffee Fellowship; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service. Rev. Doug Partin, Assoc. Rev. Ben Partin.
    Christian Science
    1725 17th St. 662-5057.
    Church of Christ

  • Church of Christ to host mini-conference

    “Living in God’s Peace” is the theme of the third annual countywide “Women2Women” mini-conference.
    The mini-conference, which seeks to connect Los Alamos women with each other and with God, will be 9 a.m.-noon, March 28 at the Los Alamos Church of Christ, 2323 Diamond Drive.
    The morning of Christian fellowship, mutual encouragement, and spiritual strengthening is open to all women of the community. There is no charge for the event. Tea and finger foods will be served, and complimentary babysitting will be available.
    The 2015 event features four local women talking on life situations requiring God’s peace.
    Mary Wilhoit will speak on, “Keeping Peace Through Loss.” Wilhoit is the wife of a former Christian minister, a mother of two children, and a grandmother of six.
    Frances Walter will speak on, “Keeping Peace Throughout Life.” Wife of a former church elder, mother of four adult children, and grandmother of three young adults, Walter has taught women’s Bible classes for more than 40 years.
    Julia Sheppard, a young mother with six young children, will speak on “Keeping Peace through Daily Chaos.”

  • Pet Talk: Household toxicities

    Although we may be extra cautious when using household cleaners, automotive products, or pest control products in our homes and gardens, it may come as a surprise that the tasty morsel we just dropped while preparing dinner could endanger our best friend.
    Chocolate can be found lying around the majority of households, especially during the holidays. Depending on the size and type of chocolate, it can be very dangerous to your pet’s health if consumed.
    Make sure that your children are aware of this, as they might think they’re treating Fido by sneaking him a piece of chocolate cake under the dinner table. If your dog does get a hold of some, chocolate is absorbed within about an hour, so you should call your veterinarian immediately.
    “Additionally, grapes and raisins can cause renal failure in dogs if eaten,” said Dr. James Barr, assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.
    “The exact cause of this is unknown, and the amount that needs to be consumed in order to be poisonous is unknown as well.”

  • Is your teen ready for a summer job?

    For many teens, there’s nothing more exciting than receiving the first paycheck from a summer job — a sure-fire ticket to fun and freedom. It’s also a great opportunity for parents to encourage proper money management.
    Parents or guardians need to do some necessary paperwork first. Working teens will need his or her own Social Security Number (SSN) to legally apply for a job. They will also need a SSN to open a bank account to deposit their paychecks. Depending on state law, children under 18 may have to open bank accounts in their custodial name with their parents or guardians. It is also important for parents to check in with qualified tax or financial advisors about their teen’s earned income, particularly if it may affect any investments under the child’s name.

  • The true gentleman

    The recent report of Sigma Alpha Epsilon’s video-recording its members chanting a racist song wasn’t really what I would call news.
    A bunch of college boys sing proudly and loudly using the N-word in celebration of their promise to exclude blacks from membership in their club?
    “There will never be a n----r at SAE.  You can hang him from a tree, but he’ll never sign with me!”
    That’s not news. Making fun of others to exclude them from one’s clique is an old and proud American tradition. And you don’t mess with tradition!
    Like many people, I was disgusted when viewing the video, saddened to see how little has changed in so many years. And like many, I cheered when the chant-leaders were expelled and the fraternity was kicked off campus.
    The SAE Fraternity Manual declares SAE as “The Singing Fraternity,” boasting that it has “many songs that our members should learn.”
    I’m guessing that the members might want to take that out of their manual now.
    The fraternity’s motto is “The True Gentleman,” and its mission statement defines this as “the man whose conduct proceeds from good will and an acute sense of propriety,” adding “one who thinks of the rights and feelings of others.”

  • Today in history March 21
  • LA baseball and tennis teams fall

    Baseball

    The Los Alamos baseball team was unable to give Fruita-Monument (Colo.) its first loss of the season Friday in the semifinals of Piedra Vista tournament. The ’Toppers fell to the Wildcats, 7-3.
    Fruita (7-0) hit five doubles in the game to take down Los Alamos (6-4).

    Tennis

    The Los Alamos girls tennis team lost a close match against La Cueva Friday, 5-4.
    The ’Toppers got wins at No. 1, 2 and 3 singles.
    Sidra Hsieh-Ratliff beat Janelle Lee 6-3, 6-2 at No. 1.
    Laura Whicker took down Riley Cook, 7-5, 6-1 at No. 2.
    At No. 3 singles, Lauryn Anaya won against Corrine Vaughan 7-6, 1-6 and 0-0 (1-0).
    La Cueva, however, won at No. 4, 5 and 6 singles and then took two of the three doubles matches to win the contest.
    Lauren Fugate and Astrid Hengartner both lost hard-fought matches in the three sets.
    Whicker and Katya Skurikhin won at No. 2 doubles for Los Alamos, 6-3, 7-5 against Vaughan and Alex Mosey.
    The dual loss was the Hilltopper girls first of the season.
    Los Alamos’ boys tennis team also lost to La Cueva, 9-0.
    No. 2 singles player George Margevicious was the only Hilltopper to boy to win a set against La Cueva, but lost his match 7-5, 1-6 and 0-0 (10-6) to Joe Cooper.

  • Altmann, world tour on hold in Alaska

    The Freeride World Tour (FWT) stop in Haines, Alaska, has turned into a balancing act of patience and alertness.
    The big mountain competition originally scheduled to take place on Tuesday.
    All of the competitors hopped in a helicopter for a 30-minute ride to a staging area. Then they jumped in another helicopter for a 10-minute ride to the peak where the competition will take place on, aptly named The Venue.
    Then clouds rolled in and the event was postponed because of the flat light.
    On Thursday the forecast looked promising, so once again the competitors made their way to the start. After waiting on the top of The Venue for four hours, however, the visibility showed no sign of improving so the event was postponed again.
    On Friday the forecast looked good and the competitors were optimistic they’d finally be able to compete.
    The helicopter rides up to The Venue were once again in vain.
    With a new storm in Alaska’s forecast, the event’s organizers are now shooting for a Sunday or Monday start.
    It was originally scheduled to take place before March 22. That date has been pushed back, keeping the ambitious Alaska dream alive.