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Today's News

  • Pet Talk: Cataracts could affect your pet’s vision

    If you’ve noticed your pet’s eye lenses becoming cloudy or opaque, your pet could be developing cataracts.
    Though cataracts can decrease vision, or even cause complete blindness, not every companion animal that develops cataracts requires surgery. Dr. Lucien Vallone, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained how cataracts can affect pets.
    “A cataract is an opacity of the lens,” Vallone said. “A clear lens is necessary for good vision; thus, any opacification can cause decreased vision. However, not all cataracts are the same. Some cases of cataracts are so severe they can cause blindness and inflammation in the eye, which may cause significant discomfort. Some cases are small enough they don’t interfere with vision at all and should be monitored.”
    All companion animals can develop cataracts, but Vallone said cataracts are common in dogs. Several breeds of dogs may be predisposed to cataracts, though not every dog within these breeds are affected.

  • Some administrative savings work better than others

    If I were planning to run for the Legislature, my list of priorities would look a little different from those you usually see. Instead of reciting the usual passionate platitudes about education and economic development, I would talk about saving taxpayer money while improving the performance of government agencies by means of methodical administrative reforms.
    Don’t worry, I’m not running, but I have been repeatedly frustrated that I’ve never seen a single campaign promise along these lines. Every now and then when a candidate has knocked on my door, literature in hand, I’ve invited the candidate in and talked about this. It doesn’t do any good. Administrative reform is tedious and unglamorous, is poorly understood by the public, and most of the time it doesn’t produce any bragging rights.
    It should especially be a focus of attention for governors and candidates for governor. Just now, with the state’s desperate need to save money, the governor is trying some things that may or may not produce results.
    Gov. Susana Martinez announced a few weeks ago that she was considering consolidating departments, but the idea disappeared down a black hole pretty quickly. That is probably because of the pummeling her staff must have taken from irate constituents the minute this thought was expressed.

  • New Mexico liberals’ tax hypocrisy

    BY D. DOUWD MUSKA
    Rio Grande Foundation

  • On the Docket 3-12-17

    Feb. 13
    Maria Cano-Gallegos was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of having an open container inside her vehicle. Defendant was fined $100 and must also pay $65 in court costs.

    Feb. 14
    Shibli A. Fazal  was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of having destructive or injurious material in the roadway. Defendant was fined $50 and must also pay $65 in court costs. Defendant also sentenced to community service in lieu of fines.

    William Roybal was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of speeding six to 10 miles an hour over the speed limit and failing to pay. Defendant was fined $100 and must also pay $130 in court costs.

    Christopher Rivera pled no contest in Los Alamos Municipal Court to improper turning. Defendant fined $100 and must also pay $65 in court costs.

    Rachel Meyer pled no contest in  the Los Alamos Municipal Court to careless driving that caused an accident. Sentencing deferred until April 14. Defendant also sentenced to defensive driving school. Defendant must pay $65 in court costs.

    Sean Stanfield  was found guilty through Citepay of failing to yield or stop at a sign. Defendant was fined $50 and must also pay $65 in court costs.

  • Police Beat 3-12-17

    Police Beat items are compiled from public information contained in Los Alamos Police Department Records. Charges or citations listed in Police Beat do not imply innocence or guilt. The Los Alamos Police Department uses the term “arrest” to define anyone who has been physically arrested, server a court summons, or issued a citation.

    Feb. 15
    7:45 a.m. — Police officers recovered a laptop computer at Morning Glory Bakery.

    3:20 p.m — Los Alamos police reported a burglary  in Los Alamos. Police are actively investigating.

    Feb. 17
    11:50 a.m. — Police reported a laptop stolen at the Los Alamos Unitarian Church.

    8:49 p.m. — Police arrested a minor for being in possession of drugs on East Road.

    Feb. 18
    1:28 p.m. — Byron Keith Henderson,  49, of Los Alamos was arrested at the intersection of North Street and San Ildefonso Road on two counts of not having a license and drug possession.

    9:37 p.m. — Police investigated an act of vandalism at the Larry R. Walkup Aquatic Center where the windshield of a car was found shattered.

    Feb. 19

  • Locals have passion for saving local wild birds

    BY WREN PROPP
    Special to the Monitor

  • Annual school art exhibit wows community

    The Los Alamos Public Schools opened its third annual, district-wide art exhibit at the Mesa Public Mesa Library Thursday, filling the library’s third floor with the sounds, colors and creativity of Los Alamos’ school students. Sculptures, paintings, drawings and even works of computer animation were on display as residents went from exhibit space to exhibit space, trying to take it all in.
    “It’s a fabulous display. This is about the importance of educating the whole child and celebrating achievements in all fields,” School Board Member Ellen Ben-Naim said. “My face hurts from smiling so much. I’m so delighted by each piece. This just reinforces to me the importance of a fine arts education.”
    The district’s art teachers choose this time to have the exhibition since March is Youth Art month and March is also Arts in the Schools Month.  The library is open on the weekend for residents who haven’t seen it yet. The exhibit features works from all five elementary schools, the middle school and the high school.
    Besides being an opportunity to show the creative side of the school district’s students, the exhibition also serves as reminder to the community of how important the arts are to education and to the students themselves.

  • History Museum to host special ‘Perspectives on Atomic Bomb’ lecture Tuesday

    The Los Alamos History Museum will host a special evening of art, film and dialogue Tuesday beginning at 5:30 p.m. at Fuller Lodge.
    As part of the annual lecture series on the theme “Multiple Perspectives on the Atomic Bomb,” the Los Alamos Historical Society will present “Visual Peace: War Transformed.”
    The night will start at 5:30 p.m. with a reception and exhibit featuring artists Masaru Tanaka, a photographer born in Hiroshima, and Betsie Miller-Kusz, a painter born in Los Alamos, who have collaborated for 18 years on the “Peace’s New Century Project,” a reconciliation art project fusing their images into peaceful digital prints.
    Several of the prints will be exhibited for one night only as part of the evening’s presentation as the artists engage in an ongoing dialogue about the effects of the Manhattan Project on their lives, families, and art.

  • Stable owners, neighbors to discuss heath, safety concerns

    A Los Alamos resident who lives on North Mesa wants the North Mesa Stables moved or closed due to what she says is healthy and safety concerns.
    She voiced her opinion Thursday at a Parks and Recreation Board public hearing.
    “What the Parks and Recreation Board has asked is for the staff to pull together the stable owners and interested neighbors to discuss her concerns and accusations,” Parks, Recreation and Open Space Division Manager Chris Wilson said.
    The issue will be placed on the Parks and Recreation’s agenda at a future date when the public can participate in the discussion.
    “The Los Alamos horse stables shouldn’t be within the city limit in the first place,” Olga Chertkov said. “They are too close to the houses. Some dangers are very serious, but not so obvious.”
     Chertkov presented a paper to the Parks and Recreation Board that detailed the levels of hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, methane and other chemicals found in the soil in and around the stables. She also claims the air is contaminated around the stables.
    Chertkov lives on a road near the stables, and when she first moved there in 2001, she said she did not mind the stables and enjoyed them with her children.

  • New Mexico lawmakers reject higher renewable power mandate

    SANTA FE (AP) — A proposal to ramp up renewable energy requirements at New Mexico's investor owned utilities and cooperatives through the year 2040 has been voted down by a Senate committee, ending chances for approval this year.
    The Senate Corporations Committee voted 5-3 Friday against a plan to gradually increase the share of electricity generated from solar, wind and other renewable sources to 80 percent of supplies for utilities.
    Senate bill sponsor Mimi Stewart of Albuquerque criticized Democratic Senate colleagues Mary Kay Papen and Clemente Sanchez for voting against the bill with Republicans.
    Portfolio standards requiring utilities to sell a specific percentage or amount of renewable electricity have been adopted in 29 states, helping drive the nation's multi-billion dollar solar and wind markets. New Mexico's standard is set for 20 percent by 2020.