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Today's News

  • Assets in Action: Time goes by fast when you have kids

    Today, I hope you’ll indulge me in a lesson in time travel.
    I feel like the most important thing you can learn from me is how fast time goes when you have children. I assume because for adults it becomes a new measure of time. I’m not sure what it is called exactly, “BC,” before children and “AC,” after children, but hopefully you are aware before it is too late.
    If you know me well, the most important thing in life is our children. The bad news for them is that doesn’t mean that we buy them everything.
    Hopefully it does mean we have passed along some wisdom, some life skills, some meaning that all of this daily grind is supposed to be worth it.
    On Saturday, our oldest, Chandler, one of a handful of fine folks that printed this very newspaper you are reading, turns 21. It’s probably the most important age for a young person today. It is also probably the last “celebrated” age.
    Sure we turn 30 or 40 or 50, but the same excitement doesn’t exist until that age is close to a retirement number.
    This beautiful baby boy came into our lives on Feb. 11, 1996 and it seems like yesterday.
    His beautiful blue eyes, just like his dad and these big box like feet, ahh that’s my boy.

  • Bradbury Museum updates displays

     

  • One more time!
  • Arts and Entertainment Calendar 2-8-17

    Art exhibits
    The National Museum of Nuclear Science and History, 601 Eubank SE in Albuquerque, will host “Critical Assembly, the Secrets of Los Alamos 1944: An Installation by American Sculptor Jim Sanborn,” through Oct. 8. This special exhibit, created by world renowned sculptor Jim Sanborn – best known for creating the encrypted “Kryptos” sculpture at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia – invites visitors to explore and study the recreations of the super secret experiments from the Manhattan Project’s atomic bomb program. The museum is open from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m., 361 days a year. For information, visit nuclearmuseum.org, or call 505-245-2137.

  • UNM-LA film students get Reel Deal Theater tour

    Jim O’Donnell, director of operations of the Reel Deal Theater, treated students of the University of New Mexico-Los Alamos’ Intro to Film Studies class (MA210) to a tour of the projection room Feb. 1, then a viewing of the musical film “La La Land.”  
    A topic of discussion was the transition from film projectors to digital projectors. The students in this semester-long course at UNM-LA have already studied the history of musicals in film.  
    Follow up projects will address how specific techniques employed in the film impact the overall experience for the viewer. “La La Land” has garnered 214 award nominations, and received 144 awards.
    The film also has 14 nominations for the Oscar Awards, which will be announced on Feb 26. Hardy and the students gave the experience behind the scenes at Reel Deal Theater “two thumbs up!”

  • Tuesday is family night at PEEC

     Family Night is set for 6-7 p.m. Tuesday at the Los Alamos Nature Center.
    Enjoy an evening of games and hands-on activities for the whole family with Mesa Public Library’s Melissa Mackey. The nature center will be open for exploring the exhibits until 8 p.m.
    Mark your calendars: the second Tuesday of each month is Family Night at the nature center. Thanks to a generous sponsorship from the Kiwanis Club of Los Alamos, this program is free for all. For more information about this and other programs offered by the Pajarito Environmental Education Center, peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org, or call 662-0460.

  • Alzheimer’s caregiver program to be offered in Los Alamos

    Families facing Alzheimer’s disease will have access to a free, seven-week education course in Los Alamos offered by the Alzheimer’s Association, New Mexico Chapter.
    The “Savvy Caregiver Program” course will be held each Wednesday from Feb. 21 through April 4.
    The program will be held once per week at the Aspen Ridge Lodge Retirement Home, 1010 Sombrillo Court. Each class lasts two hours from 1-3 p.m. The course is free and open to all.
    This evidence-based training aims to teach caregivers practical techniques for interacting with loved ones with Alzheimer’s disease, and for understanding and managing their behavior. It also imparts tools for long-term planning and for reducing stresses common to Alzheimer’s caregivers.
    The course explains the signs, impacts and pathology of Alzheimer’s disease.
    To register, or for further information, please contact Tina De Luz at (505) 266-4473, or email her at tdelaluz@alz.org. You can also contact Mary Yamada at (505) 661-0066, or email her at mary.d.yamada@gmail.com.
    Class size is limited and they do fill up quickly. Call now to register. Participants may be reimbursed for the cost of having others tend to their loved one while they attend the classes.

  • Chicken Teriyaki a fresh option in White Rock

    Hon Nguyen, owner of Chicken Teriyaki in White Rock, doesn’t like to brag. He lets his food speak for itself.
    But if he does talk about his food, he will readily give up the secret to his success, which is fresh food at a reasonable price, any way the customer wants it.
    “I’m not like those commercial restaurants,” Nguyen said. “We cook how the customer wants it.”
    While making a profit is a good thing, Nguyen also said that’s not what drives him. As a corrections officer who is nearing retirement, the real reward for him is customer satisfaction.  
    “Money is important, but what’s really important is when I see the customer finish the food, and then they come back,” Nguyen said. “That means to me they come here not because they happen to be hungry, but because my food tastes good, they come back because they can’t get that taste anywhere else. That’s what makes me happy.” Nguyen said he has customers come as far as Taos, Española and Santa Fe to eat his food.

  • NM Tourism Commission in LA Feb. 15

    The Tourism Commission will hold its next quarterly meeting from 2-4 p.m. in the Pajarito Room at Fuller Lodge Feb. 15.
    The meeting is open to the public and those interested in issues impacting tourism are encouraged to attend.
    Items for presentation and discussion include a legislative update from Tourism Secretary Rebecca Latham; a report from New Mexico Hospitality Association President and CEO Jennifer Schroer; and a presentation about the Los Alamos Community Engagement Project from Los Alamos County branding consultants Dave Hayduk with HK Advertising and Jim Glover with The Idea Group of Santa Fe.  
    The commission is charged with developing and recommending policies and program guidance for the New Mexico Tourism Department and approving annual updates to the state’s five-year tourism plan.
    The commission members are Bella Alvarez, Corporate Director of Hospitality, Heritage Hotels and Resorts; George Brooks, Ski New Mexico; John A. Garcia, Home Builders Association of Central New Mexico; Scott Hutton, Hutton Broadcasting; Jennifer Kimball, Chairman of the Board, La Fonda on the Plaza; Jay Christopher Stagg, Interim Chairman, Taos Ski Valley; and Emerson Vallo.

  • LACDC applauds veto of cuts to LEDA funding

    Los Alamos Community Development Corporation Executive Director Patrick Sullivan was pleased with Gov. Susana Martinez line-item veto of cuts to the Local Economic Development Act (LEDA) funding in SB 113, the solvency bill recently passed by the legislature.
    Martinez also requested additional money for the Job Training Incentive Program (JTIP), but funding for that program still falls far short of demand in this year’s budget.
    Sullivan sees underfunding of those two economic development tools as shortsighted.
    “I understand the difficult position the legislators are in with the budget, but between these two programs and continuing to improve our education system, that’s how we’re going to get out of the budget mess. Oil’s not going to go back to $100 a barrel,” Sullivan said.
    Although Sullivan is not aware of any local companies that have taken advantage of state LEDA funds (several have utilized local LEDA funds), he believes one or two local projects might potentially be eligible. He sees LEDA as an important economic development asset.